Child Out of Time

Growing Up with Doctor Who in the Wilderness Years

Author: Hayden Gribble

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 224

View: 843

For 26 years, DOCTOR WHO was a British institution, capturing the imaginations of generations of children. But then, in 1989, it was cancelled. The Doctor and his on-screen adventures were no more. There was no longer a hero, a champion for the outcasts who struggled to fit in. It was as though he had walked into his TARDIS and set his controls for dematerialisation, never to return: a whole generation lost to the powers of Science Fiction's greatest creation. It was in this Doctor-less world that I grew up. This is the story of how one little boy would try to find the Doctor in any way, shape or form and the obstacles he faced in doing so. This is the story of growing up without Doctor Who in the Wilderness Years...and how I lived through it.

More Doctor Who and Philosophy

Author: Courtland Lewis

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 669

More Doctor Who and Philosophy is a completely new collection of chapters, additional to Doctor Who and Philosophy (2010) by the same editors. Since that first Doctor Who and Philosophy, much has happened in the Whoniverse: a new and controversial regeneration of the Doctor, multiple new companions, a few creepy new enemies of both the Doctor and planet Earth. And the show’s fiftieth anniversary! We’ve learned some astounding new things from the ever-developing story: that the Doctor’s number one rule is to lie, that he claims to have forgotten his role in the mass extermination of the Time Lords and the Daleks, that the Daleks do have a concept of divine beauty (divine hatred, of course), and that Daleks may become insane (didn’t we assume they already were?) Oh, and the cult of the Doctor keeps growing worldwide, with more cultish fans in the US, more and bigger Who conventions, more viewers of all ages, and more serious treatment by scholars from many disciplines. New questions have been raised and new questioners have come along, so there are plenty of new topics for philosophical scrutiny. Is the “impossible” girl really impossible? Is there anything wrong with an inter-species lesbian relationship (the kids weren’t quite ready for that in 1963, but no one blinks an eye in 2015)? Can it really be right for the Doctor to lie and to selectively forget? We even have two authors who have figured out how to build a TARDIS—instructions included! (Wait, there’s a catch, no . . . ?) And then there’s that old question that just won’t go away: why does the Doctor always regenerate as a male, and is that ever going to change? An added feature of this awesome new volume is that the editors have reached out to insiders of Who fandom, people who run hugely successful Who conventions, play in Who-inspired bands, and run wildly popular podcasts and websites, to share their privileged insights into why the Doctor is so philosophically deep. No more spoilers. It’s time for the truly thoughtful travelers in both time and space to rev up the TARDIS once more. . . . Allons-y, Alonzo!

From Winston with Love and Kisses

The Young Churchill

Author: Celia Sandys

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 861

A delightful and illuminating journey through the early years of Winston Churchill, From Winston with Love and Kisses: The Young Churchill weaves together strands of Churchill’s early writing, mature recollections and reflections on childhood, and the comments of the author, Churchill’s granddaughter. Together with a rich store of images and ephemera from the family archives, this book provides an enthralling composite view of the lonely and sickly little boy who survived on sheer tenacity to become one of the greatest leaders of the twentieth century. Lavishly illustrated throughout and reproducing in facsimile many of the young Winston’s letters and early artistic efforts, this captivating book brings us an intimate portrait of Churchill’s youth.

People, Print & Paper

A Catalogue of a Travelling Exhibition Celebrating the Books of Australia, 1788-1988

Author: Michael Richards

Publisher: National Library Australia

ISBN:

Category: Australia

Page: 94

View: 526

The National Library's major public contribution to the Australian Bicentenary was the travelling exhibition, People, Print & Paper. Celebrating two hundred years of Australian books, this exhibition and the accompanying catalogue bring together a collection of books which gives a fascinating insight into an aspect of Australian life and character which is often overlooked.

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Author: Junot Díaz

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 333

Winner of: The Pulitzer Prize The National Book Critics Circle Award The Anisfield-Wolf Book Award The Jon Sargent, Sr. First Novel Prize A Time Magazine #1 Fiction Book of the Year One of the best books of 2007 according to: The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, New York Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, The Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, People, The Village Voice, Time Out New York, Salon, Baltimore City Paper, The Christian Science Monitor, Booklist, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, New York Public Library, and many more... Oscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who—from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister—dreams of becoming the Dominican J.R.R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fukú—a curse that has haunted Oscar’s family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk it all—in the name of love.

What Men Want

Author: Deborah Blumenthal

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 814

Q: How does a thirty-five-year-old newspaper reporter with a vanilla-sounding name like Jenny George know so much about men? A: She doesn't. When her live-in boyfriend made a relationship trade-in (for the lingerie model starring in the ad campaign Jenny created) she realized she knew nothing about men. But Jenny is about to be clued in. Assigned to the Caribbean to write an exposé on a womanizing Hollywood movie tycoon, she's pitted against the tough-talking journalist and bane of her existence, Slaid Warren. Slaid takes issue with Jenny's quest to be the best and sets out to show her 1) There's more to life than just work; 2) They're stronger when they work as a team and not at cross-purposes and 3) He really does live up to all his hype. Armed with these new insights—and a killer tan—Jenny suddenly couldn't care less about what men want. Instead, she's launching her own plan that's guaranteed to give her exactly what she needs….

Facing West

The Metaphysics of Indian-hating and Empire-building

Author: Richard Drinnon

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 572

View: 269

American expansion, says Richard Drinnon, is characterized by repression and racism. In his reinterpretation of "winning" the West, Drinnon links racism with colonialism and traces this interrelationship from the Pequot War in New England, through American expansion westward to the Pacific, and beyond to the Phillippines and Vietnam. He cites parrallels between the slaughter of bison on the Great Plains and the defoliation of Vietnam and notes similarities in the language of aggression used in the American West, the Philippines, and Southeast Asia.