Chasing the Rising Sun

The Journey of an American Song

Author: Ted Anthony

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 336

View: 555

Chasing the Rising Sun is the story of an American musical journey told by a prize-winning writer who traced one song in its many incarnations as it was carried across the world by some of the most famous singers of the twentieth century. Most people know the song "House of the Rising Sun" as 1960s rock by the British Invasion group the Animals, a ballad about a place in New Orleans -- a whorehouse or a prison or gambling joint that's been the ruin of many poor girls or boys. Bob Dylan did a version and Frijid Pink cut a hard-rocking rendition. But that barely scratches the surface; few songs have traveled a journey as intricate as "House of the Rising Sun." The rise of the song in this country and the launch of its world travels can be traced to Georgia Turner, a poor, sixteen-year-old daughter of a miner living in Middlesboro, Kentucky, in 1937 when the young folk-music collector Alan Lomax, on a trip collecting field recordings, captured her voice singing "The Rising Sun Blues." Lomax deposited the song in the Library of Congress and included it in the 1941 book Our Singing Country. In short order, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Lead Belly, and Josh White learned the song and each recorded it. From there it began to move to the planet's farthest corners. Today, hundreds of artists have recorded "House of the Rising Sun," and it can be heard in the most diverse of places -- Chinese karaoke bars, Gatorade ads, and as a ring tone on cell phones. Anthony began his search in New Orleans, where he met Eric Burdon of the Animals. He traveled to the Appalachians -- to eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, and western North Carolina -- to scour the mountains for the song's beginnings. He found Homer Callahan, who learned it in the mountains during a corn shucking; he discovered connections to Clarence "Tom" Ashley, who traveled as a performer in a 1920s medicine show. He went to Daisy, Kentucky, to visit the family of the late high-lonesome singer Roscoe Holcomb, and finally back to Bourbon Street to see if there really was a House of the Rising Sun. He interviewed scores of singers who performed the song. Through his own journey he discovered how American traditions survived and prospered -- and how a piece of culture moves through the modern world, propelled by technology and globalization and recorded sound.

To Chase the Rising Sun

Author: Warren K. Parker

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 198

View: 166

NA

Chasing the rising sun

a study of Thai garment companies exporting to Japan and the United States

Author: Pawalpat Melnichuk

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 418

View: 409

Chasing the Sun

The Epic Story of the Star That Gives us Life

Author: Richard Cohen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 120

The Sun is so powerful, so much bigger than us, that it is a terrifying subject. Yet though we depend on it, we take it for granted. Amazingly the first book of its kind, CHASING THE SUNis a cultural and scientific history of our relationship with the star that gives us life. Richard Cohen, applying the same mix of wide-ranging reference and intimate detail that won outstanding reviews for By the Sword, travels from the ancient Greek astronomers to modern-day solar scientists, from Stonehenge to Antarctica (site of the solar eclipse of 2003, when penguins were said to sing), Mexico's Aztecs to the Norwegian city of Tromso, where for two months of the year there is no Sun at all. He introduces us to the crucial 'sunspot cycle' in modern economics, the religious dances of Indian tribesmen, the histories of sundials and calendars, the plight of migrating birds, the latest theories of global warming, and Galileo recording his discoveries in code, for fear of persecution. And throughout, there is the rich Sun literature -- from the writings of Homer through Dante and Nietzsche to Keats, Shelley and beyond. Blindingly impressive and hugely readable, this is a tour de force of narrative non-fiction.

Chasing the Sun

Author: Kaki Warner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 695

A rancher and the woman he wronged get a second chance at love in the final western romance in Kaki Warner’s Blood Rose Trilogy... Daisy Etheridge had to put her dreams aside when she fell in love and bore the child of a man who loved another. Now, she’s been given the opportunity to sing on a real stage and provide a better life for her daughter—but training will require money Daisy doesn't have. With nowhere else to turn Daisy heads to New Mexico Territory to ask for the help of the wealthy family of the man who abandoned her... While Jack Wilkins never wanted to work his family’s ranch, a devotion to a childhood love has brought him back home to win her one last time. But when Daisy appears with a baby who has eyes like his own, Jack gets caught between his feelings for his old flame and his new role as a father. Jack offers to marry Daisy—though she’s wary of a man whose head and heart are prone to wanderlust. But when the ranch is threatened and the Wilkins family is strained to the breaking point, Jack and Daisy must choose what they want out of their lives—and out of each other...

6-Dec

A Novel

Author: Martin Cruz Smith

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 203

Harry Niles, a disreputable American businessman with an unknown agenda, seeks to abandon his life in Tokyo while fleeing to the west on the last flight out before the Pearl Harbor attack.

Tokyo Station

Author: Martin Cruz Smith

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 167

1922, Tokyo. Harry Niles is a 'wild child', an American boy in a strange country, ignored by his missionary parents, he begins to lead his life in the Tokyo underworld. One night, he is charged with delivering a painting to an enigmatic figure, the samurai Ishigami. It is an encounter that will haunt Harry Niles forever... 1937, Nanking. China is under attack. The Japanese army is brutally and systematically murdering and raping the local population. In the midst of this horror, Harry finds himself face to face once again with Lieutenant Ishigami. But for the samurai warrior, their meeting leads to the greatest possible dishonour - public humiliation. 1941, Tokyo. With the attack on Pearl Harbour only days away, Japan is on the brink of war with the United States. Harry Niles has become a man of many faces. Allying himself with both sides, he treads a dangerous - but profitable - path between the fading glory of the Chrysantheum Club, where the city's banking and industrial elite meet, and the shadowy Tokyo underworld.

Death's Golden Whisper

A Meg Harris Mystery

Author: R.J. Harlick

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 344

View: 164

Meg Harris believes are fishermen to the isolated northern lake she lives on. Within hours, she discovers that these men have come to develop a gold mine. She combines forces with Eric Odjik, chief of the neighbouring Migiskan reserve, to fight the mining company.

Rolling Thunder Against the Rising Sun

The Combat History of U.S. Army Tank Battalions in the Pacific in World War II

Author: Gene Eric Salecker

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 922

First work dedicated solely to the use of Army tanks in the Pacific Theater. Covers armor battles in the Philippines, Makin, the Solomons, Rabaul, New Guinea, Saipan, Guam, and Okinawa.

Chasing The Monk's Shadow

A Journey in the Footsteps of Xuanzang

Author: Mishi Saran

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 456

View: 723

An Indian woman with a China craze, a Chinese monk with an Indian obsession; we had the same schizophrenia, the monk and I. It seemed logical to take the same road.' In the seventh century AD, the Chinese monk Xuanzang (earlier spelt as Hiuen Tsang or Hsuan Tsang) set off on an epic journey to India to study Buddhist philosophy from the Indian masters. Travelling along the Silk Road, through the desolate wastes of the Gobi desert and the icy passes of Central Asia, braving brigands and blizzards, Xuanzang finally reached India, where his spiritual quest took him to Buddhist holy places and monasteries throughout the subcontinent. By the time he returned to China eighteen years later, carrying with him nearly 600 scriptures which he translated from Sanskrit into Chinese, Xuanzang had covered an astonishing 10,000 miles. He also left a detailed record of his journey, which remains a valuable source of historical information on the regions he traversed. Fourteen hundred years later, Mishi Saran follows in Xuanzang's footsteps to the fabled oasis cities of China and Central Asia, and the Buddhist sites and now-vanished kingdoms in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan that Xuanzang wrote about. Travelling seamlessly back and forth in time between the seventh century and the twenty-first, Saran uncovers the past with consummate skill even as she brings alive the present through her vivid and engaging descriptions of people and places. Her gripping chronicle includes an extraordinary eyewitness account of Kabul under the Taliban regime, just one month before 9/11. Running parallel to the account of her travels is the moving story of the author's inner journey towards a new understanding of her roots and her identity. With its riveting mix of lively reportage, high adventure, historical inquiry and personal memoir, this delightfully written book is a path-breaking travelogue.