Bond Men Made Free

Medieval Peasant Movements and the English Rising of 1381

Author: Rodney Hilton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 969

Rodney Hilton's account of the Peasant's Revolt of 1381 remains the classic authoritative text on the 'English Rising'. Hilton views the revolt in the context of a general European pattern of class conflict. He demonstrates that the peasant movements that disturbed the Middle Ages were not mere unrelated outbreaks of violence but had their roots in common economic and political conditions and in a recurring conflict of interest between peasants and landowners. Now with a new introduction by Christopher Dyer, this survey remains the leading source for students of medieval English peasantry.

Bond Men Made Free

Medieval Peasant Movements and the English Rising of 1381

Author: Rodney Howard Hilton

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 477

Rodney Hilton's account of the Peasant's Revolt of 1381 remains the classic authoritative text on the 'English Rising'. Hilton views the revolt in the context of a genral European pattern of class conflict. He demonstrates that the peasant movements that disturbed the Middle Ages were not mere unrelated outbreaks of violence but had their roots in common economic and political conditions and in a recurring conflict of interest between peasants and landowners. Now with a new introduction by Christopher Dyer, this survey is still a leading source for students of medieval English peasantry.

Bond Men Made Free

Medieval Peasant Movements and the English Rising of 1381

Author: Hilton, Rodney Howard Hilton

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic books

Page: 240

View: 419

The English Rising of 1381

Author: R. H. Hilton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 930

This book contains eight articles, six of which are based on papers contributed to a commemoration conference organised by the Past and Present Society in 1981. Two further articles and an introduction are contributed by other experts. They explore the various dimensions of the rising of 1381: the discontent of peasants and townspeople which became politicised in response to government tax demands; reasons for the attitudes of the subordinated classes to the law, which they perceived as being the instrument of their oppressors; the response of the ruling class and its government to one of the most coherent challenges to feudal order in the Middle Ages. In addition, two contributions on social movements in fourteenth-century France and Italy show that the rising can be regarded as a symptom of the general crisis of European feudal society in the later Middle Ages.

King Death

The Black Death And Its Aftermath In Late-Medieval England

Author: Colin Platt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 237

This illustrated survey examines what it was actually like to live with plague and the threat of plague in late-medieval and early modern England.; Colin Platt's books include "The English Medieval Town", "Medieval England: A Social History and Archaeology from the Conquest to 1600" and "The Architecture of Medieval Britain: A Social History" which won the Wolfson Prize for 1990. This book is intended for undergraduate/6th form courses on medieval England, option courses on demography, medicine, family and social focus. The "black death" and population decline is central to A-level syllabuses on this period.

A Prospering Society

Wiltshire in the Later Middle Ages

Author: John Hare

Publisher: Univ of Hertfordshire Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 101

Based on a case study of a particular countryside and town in southern England—namely, the county of Wiltshire and the city of Salisbury—this record seeks to explore the changing nature of English society during the period from 1380 to 1520. It examines the influence of landscape and population on the agriculture of Wiltshire, the regional patterns of arable and pastoral farming, and the growing contrast between the large-scale mixed farming of the chalklands and the family farms of the claylands. Discussing how economic growth generated problems of its own, this study is the first to fully investigate Wiltshire’s agriculture history during the late Middle Ages, a period recognized as one of considerable change.

The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Christianity

Author: John H. Arnold

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 752

The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Christianity takes as its subject the beliefs, practices, and institutions of the Christian Church between 400 and 1500AD. It addresses topics ranging from early medieval monasticism to late medieval mysticism, from the material wealth of the Church to the spiritual exercises through which certain believers might attempt to improve their souls. Each chapter tells a story, but seeks also to ask how and why 'Christianity' took particular forms at particular moments in history, paying attention to both the spiritual and otherwordly aspects of religion, and the material and political contexts in which they were often embedded. This Handbook is a landmark academic collection that presents cutting-edge interpretive perspectives on medieval religion for a wide academic audience, drawing together thirty key scholars in the field from the United States, the UK, and Europe. Notably, the Handbook is arranged thematically, and focusses on an analytical, rather than narrative, approach, seeking to demonstrate the variety, change, and complexity of religion throughout this long period, and the numerous different ways in which modern scholarship can approach it. While providing a very wide-ranging view of the subject, it also offers an important agenda for further study in the field.

Christ's Body

Identity, Culture and Society in Late Medieval Writings

Author: Sarah Beckwith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 798

At the very heart of Christian doctrine and late medieval practice was the image of the crucified Christ. Sarah Beckwith examines the social meaning of this image across a range of key devotional English texts, using insights from anthropology and cultural studies. The image of the crucified Christ, she argues, acted as a place where the tensions between the sacred and the profane, the individual and the collective, were played out. The medieval obsession with the contours of Christ's body functioned to challenge and transform social and political relations. A fascinating and challenging book of interest not only to students of medieval literature, but also to cultural historians and women's studies specialists.