Becoming an Ally

Breaking the Cycle of Oppression in People

Author: Anne Bishop

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Oppression (Psychology)

Page: 208

View: 215

Anne Bishop confronts the question of oppression head on by drawing on her own experience both as an oppressed person as an oppressor. She tells us the we learn to be oppressors from our own oppression.

Beyond Token Change

Breaking the Cycle of Oppression in Institutions

Author: Anne Bishop

Publisher: Halifax, N.S. : Fernwood

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 855

Using a case study as its starting point, this guide examines the patterns of oppression built into organizations and institutions. Such systems of discrimination and oppression originate not with individuals within the institution, but rather the dynamics within the institutions themselves. Attention is given to the tactics employed to achieve equality and overcome oppressive attitudes in the workplace. According to this analysis, the true test of an institution's intentions is whether its policies achieve only token change or transform its deeper structure.

Internalized Oppression

The Psychology of Marginalized Groups

Author: E.J.R. David, Ph.D.

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 328

View: 944

ìIt is a great honorÖto write the foreword to such an important book edited by E.J.R. David, filled with contributions from leading and emerging psychological scholars on internalized oppression. One of the best features of the book, in my opinion, is that the chapter authorsÖare allowed to share their own personal experiences and that such experiences are regarded to be just as valid and legitimate as the ëtheoriesí and ëempirical studiesí that they review.î -Eduardo Duran, PhD 7th Direction Therapy, Assessment, and Consulting Author of Healing the Soul Wound and Co-Author of Native American Postcolonial Psychology The oppression of various groups has taken place throughout human history. People are stereotyped, discriminated against, and treated unjustly simply because of their social group membership. But what does it look like when the oppression that people face from the outside gets under their skin? Long overdue, this is the first book to highlight the universality of internalized oppression across marginalized groups in the United States from a mental health perspective. It focuses on the psychological manifestations and mental health implications of internalized oppression for a variety of groups. The book provides insight into the ways in which internalized oppression influences the thoughts, attitudes, feelings, and behaviors of the oppressed toward themselves, other members of their group, and members of the dominant group. It also considers promising clinical and community programs that are currently addressing internalized oppression among specific groups. The book describes the implications and unique manifestations of internalized oppression among African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, American Indians and Alaska natives, women, people with disabilities, and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community. For each group, the text considers its demographic profile, history of oppression, contemporary oppression, common manifestations and mental and behavioral health implications, clinical and community programs, and future directions. Chapters are written by leading and emerging scholars, who share their personal experiences to provide a real-world point of view. Additionally, each chapter is coauthored by a member of a particular community group, who helps to bring academic concepts to life. Key Features: Addresses the universality of internalized oppression across marginalized groups in the U.S. and its corresponding mental health and psychological manifestations Considers how specific groups exhibit internalized oppression in their own unique ways Provides insight into how internalized oppression influences the thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors of the oppressed Highlights promising clinical and community programs

Becoming a Social Justice Leader

Using Head, Heart, and Hands to Dismantle Oppression

Author: Phil Hunsberger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 118

View: 906

This important book helps school leaders let go of a "comfortable" mindset and enter a world of courageous conversations that examine and challenge the impact of racism and other forms of oppression on disciplinary patterns, instructional practices, and school policies. Authors Hunsberger, Mayo, and Neal prepare you to address these difficult issues though authentic, critical discourse. The book includes classroom activities and facilitation tips to help prompt systematic changes in schools through improving instruction, supporting inclusiveness, and strengthening student engagement. After reading Becoming a Social Justice Leader you’ll be able to: Design conversations that support participant engagement and create a safe environment for discussion. Explore personal dispositions, attitudes, and stances that contribute to systemic oppression. Understand how oppression is established and sustained in order to enact change. Create alliances within school settings to foster dialogue and combat oppression. Additional worksheets that help educators examine and expand their work as social justice leaders are also available for download (http://www.routledge.com/products/9781138957749).

Desire for Development

Whiteness, Gender, and the Helping Imperative

Author: Barbara Heron

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 281

In Desire for Development: Whiteness, Gender, and the Helping Imperative, Barbara Heron draws on poststructuralist notions of subjectivity, critical race and space theory, feminism, colonial and postcolonial studies, and travel writing to trace colonial continuities in the post-development recollections of white Canadian women who have worked in Africa. Following the narrative arc of the development worker story from the decision to go overseas, through the experiences abroad, the return home, and final reflections, the book interweaves theory with the words of the participants to bring theory to life and to generate new understandings of whiteness and development work. Heron reveals how the desire for development is about the making of self in terms that are highly raced, classed, and gendered, and she exposes the moral core of this self and its seemingly paradoxical necessity to the Other. The construction of white female subjectivity is thereby revealed as contingent on notions of goodness and Othering, played out against, and constituted by, the backdrop of the NorthSouth binary, in which Canada’s national narrative situates us as the “good guys” of the world.

The Politics of Recognition and Social Justice

Transforming Subjectivities and New Forms of Resistance

Author: Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 278

View: 691

Via a wide range of case studies, this book examines new forms of resistance to social injustices in contemporary Western societies. Resistance requires agency, and agency is grounded in notions of the subject and subjectivity. How do people make sense of their subjectivity as they are constructed and reconstructed within relations of power? What kinds of subjectivities are needed to struggle against forms of dominance and claim recognition? The participants in the case studies are challenging forms of dominance and subordination grounded in class, race, culture, nationality, sexuality, religion, age, disability and other forms of social division. It is a premise of this book that new and/or reconstructed forms of subjectivity are required to challenge social relations of subordination and domination. Thus, the transformation of subjectivity as well as the restructuring of oppressive power relations is necessary to achieve social justice. By examining the construction of subjectivity of particular groups through an intersectional lens, the book aims to contribute to theoretical accounts of how subjects are constituted and how they can develop a critical distance from their positioning.

Social Welfare Policy for a Sustainable Future

The U.S. in Global Context

Author: Katherine S. van Wormer

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 152

Unique in its use of a sustainability framework, Social Welfare Policy for a Sustainable Future by Katherine S. van Wormer and Rosemary J. Link goes beyond U.S. borders to examine U.S. government policies—including child welfare, social services, health care, and criminal justice—within a global context. Guided by the belief that forces from the global market and globalization affect all social workers in their practice, the book addresses a wide range of relevant topics, including the refugee journey, the impact of new technologies, war trauma, global policy instruments, and restorative justice. A sustainability policy analysis model and an ecosystems framework for trauma-informed care are also presented in this timely text.

Strengths-Based Supervision in Clinical Practice

Author: Jeffrey K. Edwards

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 691

Moving away from the usual medical-modeled framework of mental health focused on problems, Strengths-Based Supervision in Clinical Practice by Jeffrey K. Edwards takes a postmodern, social construction approach, looking for and amplifying strengths and encouraging stakeholders to use them. Based on research in brain science, as well as from the Information Age/Connectivity Age thinking, the book reframes the focus of supervision, management, and leadership to one that collaborates and builds on strengths with supervisees as competent stakeholders in their work with their clients.

Social Work, Social Justice, and Human Rights

A Structural Approach to Practice, Second Edition

Author: Colleen Lundy

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 535

Social workers take pride in their commitment to social and economic justice, peace, and human rights, and in their responses to related inequalities and social problems. At a time when economic globalization, armed conflict, and ecological devastation continue to undermine human rights and the possibilities for social justice, the need for linking a structural analysis to social work practice is greater than ever. The second edition of this popular social work practice text more fully addresses the connection between social justice and human rights. It includes a discussion of social work's role in promoting peace and responding to environmental problems. It also places a greater attention on the links between social work theories/concepts and practice skill/responses. The text has been updated and revised throughout with four new chapters: social work and human rights, cultural competence and practice with immigrant communities, social work and mental health communities, and practice with couples and families. Detailed case studies demonstrate the integration of theory, policy, and practice.

Advancing Social Justice

Tools, Pedagogies, and Strategies to Transform Your Campus

Author: Tracy Davis

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 280

Tools and strategies to foster transformative change for social justice Many believe that social justice education is simply the new politically correct term for diversity-focused intervention or multiculturalism. The true definition, however, is more complex, nuanced, and important to understand. Higher education today needs clarity on both the concept of social justice and effective tools to successfully translate theory into practice. In Advancing Social Justice: Tools, Pedagogies, and Strategies to Transform Your Campus, Tracy Davis and Laura M. Harrison offer educators a clear understanding of what social justice is, along with effective practices to help higher education institutions embrace a broad social justice approach in all aspects of their work with students, both inside and outside of the classroom. Theoretical, philosophical, and practical, the book challenges readers to take a step back from where they are, do an honest and unvarnished assessment of how they currently practice social justice, rethink how they approach their work, and re-engage based on a more informed and rigorous conceptual framework. The authors begin by clarifying the definition of social justice as an approach that examines and acknowledges the impact of institutional and historical systems of power and privilege on individual identity and relationships. Exploring identity devel-opment using the critical lenses of history and context, they concentrate on ways that oppression and privilege are manifest in the lived experiences of students. They also highlight important concepts to consider in designing and implementing effective social justice interventions and provide examples of effective social justice education. Finally, the book provides teachers and practitioners with tools and strategies to infuse a social justice approach into their work with students and within their institutions.