At the Strangers' Gate

Arrivals in New York

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101947500

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 8909

From The New York Times best-selling author of Paris to the Moon and beloved New Yorker writer, a memoir that captures the romance of New York City in the 1980s. When Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, first arrived in 1980, New York City was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a place where both life’s consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers’ Gate is a vivid portrait of this time, told through the story of one couple’s journey—from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Through a series of comic mini-anthropologies that capture the fashion, publishing, and art worlds of the era, Adam Gopnik transports us from his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side to a SoHo loft, from his time as a graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the galleries of MoMA. Filled with tender and humorous reminiscences—including affectionate reflections on Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others—At the Strangers’ Gate is an ode to New York striving.

At the Strangers' Gate

Arrivals in New York

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Knopf Canada

ISBN: 0735273138

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 8640

A vivid memoir that captures the energy, ambition and romance of New York in the 1980s from the beloved New Yorker Canadian writer, to stand alongside his bestselling Paris to the Moon and Through the Children's Gate. When Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha Parker, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young and the arty and ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Stranger's Gate builds a portrait of this moment in New York through the story of their journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to their tiny basement room on the Upper East Side--the smallest apartment in Manhattan--and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. Between tender, laugh-out-loud reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of New York luminaries from Richard Avedon to Robert Hughes and Jeff Koons, Gopnik takes us into the corridors of Condé Nast, the galleries of MoMA and many places between to illuminate the fascinating world capital of creativity and aspiration that is New York, then and now.

At the Strangers' Gate

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1786489201

Category: Photography

Page: 352

View: 1881

'A dazzling talent' Malcolm Gladwell When Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers' Gate builds a portrait of this particular moment in New York through the story of this couple's journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side, and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. He takes us through his professional meanderings, from graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the corridors of Conde Nast and the galleries of MoMA. Between tender and humorous reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others, Gopnik discusses the ethics of ambition, the economy of creative capital, and the peculiar anthropology of art and aspiration in New York, then and now.

Paris to the Moon

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588361387

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 6503

Paris. The name alone conjures images of chestnut-lined boulevards, sidewalk cafés, breathtaking façades around every corner--in short, an exquisite romanticism that has captured the American imagination for as long as there have been Americans. In 1995, Adam Gopnik, his wife, and their infant son left the familiar comforts and hassles of New York City for the urbane glamour of the City of Light. Gopnik is a longtime New Yorker writer, and the magazine has sent its writers to Paris for decades--but his was above all a personal pilgrimage to the place that had for so long been the undisputed capital of everything cultural and beautiful. It was also the opportunity to raise a child who would know what it was to romp in the Luxembourg Gardens, to enjoy a croque monsieur in a Left Bank café--a child (and perhaps a father, too) who would have a grasp of that Parisian sense of style we Americans find so elusive. So, in the grand tradition of the American abroad, Gopnik walked the paths of the Tuileries, enjoyed philosophical discussions at his local bistro, wrote as violet twilight fell on the arrondissements. Of course, as readers of Gopnik's beloved and award-winning "Paris Journals" in The New Yorker know, there was also the matter of raising a child and carrying on with day-to-day, not-so-fabled life. Evenings with French intellectuals preceded middle-of-the-night baby feedings; afternoons were filled with trips to the Musée d'Orsay and pinball games; weekday leftovers were eaten while three-star chefs debated a "culinary crisis." As Gopnik describes in this funny and tender book, the dual processes of navigating a foreign city and becoming a parent are not completely dissimilar journeys--both hold new routines, new languages, a new set of rules by which everyday life is lived. With singular wit and insight, Gopnik weaves the magical with the mundane in a wholly delightful, often hilarious look at what it was to be an American family man in Paris at the end of the twentieth century. "We went to Paris for a sentimental reeducation-I did anyway-even though the sentiments we were instructed in were not the ones we were expecting to learn, which I believe is why they call it an education."

Strangers' Gate

Author: Tom Casey

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780765311900

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 3139

Falling in love with Charlotte Lansing, the wife of a drug-lord pornographer, pilot Jason Walker flees for his life with Charlotte from a team of hit men who pursue them through the bars, beaches, and villas of the Caribbean.

Through the Children's Gate

A Home in New York

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 0307369277

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 5079

Following Adam Gopnik’s best-selling Paris to the Moon, the adventure continues against the panorama of another storied city. Autumn, 2000: the Gopnik family moves back to a New York that seems, at first, safer and shinier than ever. Here are the triumphs and travails of father, mother, son and daughter; and of the teachers, coaches, therapists, adversaries and friends who round out the extended urban family. From Bluie, a goldfish fated to meet a Hitchcockian end, to Charlie Ravioli, an imaginary playmate who, being a New Yorker, is too busy to play, Gopnik’s New York is charmed by the civilization of childhood. It is a fabric of living, which, though rent by the events of 9/11, will reweave itself, reviving a world where Jewish jokes mingle with debates about the problem of consciousness, the price of real estate and the meaning of modern art. By turns elegant and exultant, written with a signature mix of mind and heart, Through the Children’s Gate is at once a celebration of a newly fragile city and a poignant study of a family trying to find its way, and joy, within it. From the Hardcover edition.

Strangers at the Gates

Movements and States in Contentious Politics

Author: Sidney Tarrow

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107009383

Category: Philosophy

Page: 260

View: 5410

This book contains the products of work carried out over four decades of research in Italy, France, and the United States, and in the intellectual territory between social movements, comparative politics, and historical sociology. Using a variety of methods ranging from statistical analysis to historical case studies to linguistic analysis, the book centers on historical catalogs of protest events and cycles of collective action. Sidney Tarrow places social movements in the broader arena of contentious politics, in relation to states, political parties, and other actors. From peasants and communists in 1960s Italy, to movements and politics in contemporary western polities, to the global justice movement in the new century, the book argues that contentious actors are neither outside of nor completely within politics, but rather they occupy the uncertain territory between total opposition and integration into policy.

Strangers at the Gates

New Immigrants in Urban America

Author: Roger David Waldinger

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520230934

Category: Social Science

Page: 339

View: 5589

"As an admirable successor to Ethnic Los Angeles, this work examines the challenges confronting immigrant workers in urban areas. Strangers at the Gates should be of great interest to scholars and non-scholars interested in contemporary immigration and the American future."--Richard Alba, author of Ethnic Identity: The Transformation of White America "Strangers at the Gates brings new evidence and theorizing to central issues in the sociology of immigrant and ethnic life. An excellent educational resource, informing readers, while simultaneously training them how to carry out sophisticated, comparative social science research, this well-written work will be required reading in immigration, stratification, ethnicity, race relations, urban studies, social geography, social policy, intro to sociology, and demography."--Steve Gold, co-author of Ethnic Economies "Strangers at the Gates is another powerful tour d' horizon by Waldinger and his associates. This is a richly textured look at one of immigration's most important topics: how immigrants respond to and remake once again America's urban low-wage labor markets in the 'capitals of immigrant America.' Among the book's thought-provoking findings is a newfound--if tentative--'optimism' about the prospects of the second generation."--Demetri Papdemetriou, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace "Strangers at the Gates is a penetrating, timely analysis of the economic successes and problems of today's immigrants and of the native-born Americans with whom they coexist and compete. This wide-ranging and lively contribution to the newly reinvented field of economic sociology will appeal to researchers, students, policymakers, and the general public."--Herbert Gans, author of Making Sense of America: Sociological Analyses and Essays

Strangers at the Gate

Social Disorder in South China, 1839-1861

Author: Frederic E. Wakeman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520212398

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 5987

First published in 1966, and now available once more, this pioneering work examines the relationship between the Chinese civil and military authorities and the British trading community in Guangdong province on the eve of the Taiping Rebellion--one of the most calamitous events in Chinese history. The book explores the various factors that led to the progression of rebellion and the inevitability of revolution.

Strangers at the Gate

The "Boat People's" First Ten Years in Canada

Author: Morton Beiser

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9780802081179

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 8048

Includes statistics.

STRANGER AT THE GATE

Author: Mel White

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501123998

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 8270

A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.

The Table Comes First

Family, France, and the Meaning of Food

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307700593

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 3024

Never before have we cared so much about food. It preoccupies our popular culture, our fantasies, and even our moralizing—“You still eat meat?” With our top chefs as deities and finest restaurants as places of pilgrimage, we have made food the stuff of secular seeking and transcendence, finding heaven in a mouthful. But have we come any closer to discovering the true meaning of food in our lives? With inimitable charm and learning, Adam Gopnik takes us on a beguiling journey in search of that meaning as he charts America’s recent and rapid evolution from commendably aware eaters to manic, compulsive gastronomes. It is a journey that begins in eighteenth-century France—the birthplace of our modern tastes (and, by no coincidence, of the restaurant)—and carries us to the kitchens of the White House, the molecular meccas of Barcelona, and beyond. To understand why so many of us apparently live to eat, Gopnik delves into the most burning questions of our time, including: Should a Manhattanite bother to find chicken killed in the Bronx? Is a great vintage really any better than a good bottle of wine? And: Why does dessert matter so much? Throughout, he reminds us of a time-honored truth often lost amid our newfound gastronomic pieties and certitudes: What goes on the table has never mattered as much to our lives as what goes on around the table—the scene of families, friends, lovers coming together, or breaking apart; conversation across the simplest or grandest board. This, ultimately, is who we are. Following in the footsteps of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, Adam Gopnik gently satirizes the entire human comedy of the comestible as he surveys the wide world of taste that we have lately made our home. The Table Comes First is the delightful beginning of a new conversation about the way we eat now. From the Hardcover edition.

The Steps Across the Water

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 0385669968

Category: Adopted children

Page: 304

View: 1683

Young Rose discovers magical glass steps in New York's Central Park that lead to the fantastic city of U Nork, whose residents have been awaiting the arrival of the only person who can save them.

Strangers at Our Gates

Canadian Immigration and Immigration Policy, 1540–2015

Author: Valerie Knowles

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1459732871

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6794

In this new and revised edition, Knowles explores new materials relating to multiculturalism and immigration. Immigrants and immigration have always been central to Canadians’ perception of themselves as a country and a society. In this crisply written history, Valerie Knowles describes the different kinds of immigrants who have settled in Canada, and the immigration policies that have helped define the character of Canadian immigrants over the centuries. Key policymakers and shapers of public opinion figure prominently in this colourful story, as does the role played by racism. This new and revised edition features a chapter on the Conservative government’s handling of immigration between 2006 and 2014. Special attention is paid to the role played by the activist minister Jason Kenney and his attempts to develop a faster, more flexible immigration regime. The Temporary Foreign Worker Program and the Interim Federal Health Program are also discussed. The book’s final chapter, “Issues in the Twenty-First Century,” introduces new material relating to multiculturalism and outlines arguments supporting population growth, increased immigration, and decreased immigration.

Biblical Narratives of Israelites and Their Neighbors

Strangers at the Gate

Author: Adriane Leveen, MSW, PhD

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351785559

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2003

Throughout the Hebrew Bible, strangers are indispensable to the formation of a collective Israelite identity. Encounters between the Israelites and their neighbors are among the most urgent matters explored in biblical narratives, yet relatively little scholarly attention has been paid to them. This book corrects that imbalance by carrying out close readings of the accounts of Israel's myriad interactions with the surrounding nations. The book follows the people of Israel after they leave Egypt, as they wander in the wilderness, cross over into the land, become a unified people Israel and face explusion from that land. The introduction lays the groundwork for a literary reading. Each chapter that follows highlights a distinct people and the issues that they create. For example, Jethro, father-in-law of Moses and a Midian priest, provides a model of collaboration, while Samson's behavior triggers a cycle of violent retribution. These engaging stories illustrate the perceived dangers of idolatry and military oppression, but also convey lessons in governance, cultural innovation and the building of alliances. This book is vital reading for Biblical scholars and interested readers who want to deepen their understanding of the Israelites' relationship with neighboring peoples. It will also be of keen interest to academics who work in ancient history and culture.

Winter

Five Windows on the Season

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 1770890459

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 4991

The 2011 CBC Massey Lectures celebrates fifty years with bestselling author, essayist, cultural observer, and famed New Yorker contributor Adam Gopnik, whose subject is winter -- the season, the space, the cycle. Gopnik takes us on an intimate tour of the artists, poets, composers, writers, explorers, scientists, and thinkers, who helped shape a new and modern idea of winter. Here we learn how a poem by William Cowper heralds the arrival of the middle class; how snow science leads to existential questions of God and our place in the world; how the race to the poles marks the human drive to imprint meaning on a blank space. Gopnik’s kaleidoscopic work ends in the present day, when he traverses the underground city in Montreal, pondering the future of Northern culture. A stunningly beautiful meditation buoyed by Gopnik’s trademark gentle wit, Winter is at once an enchanting homage to an idea of a season and a captivating journey through the modern imagination. This deluxe 50th anniversary edition includes full-colour images printed on two 8-page inserts.

Strangers within the Gate City

the Jews of Atlanta, 1845-1915

Author: Steven Hertzberg

Publisher: Jewish Pubn Society

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 6204

Angels and Ages

A Short Book about Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life

Author: Adam Gopnik

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307271211

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 3187

In this captivating double life, Adam Gopnik searches for the men behind the icons of emancipation and evolution. Born by cosmic coincidence on the same day in 1809 and separated by an ocean, Lincoln and Darwin coauthored our sense of history and our understanding of man’s place in the world. Here Gopnik reveals these two men as they really were: family men and social climbers, ambitious manipulators and courageous adventurers, grieving parents and brilliant scholars. Above all we see them as thinkers and writers, making and witnessing the great changes in thought that mark truly modern times. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Factory of Facts

Author: Luc Sante

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307815587

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 5123

The acclaimed author of Low Life reinvents the memoir in a cunning, lyrical book that is at once a personal history and a meditation on the construction of identity. Born in Belgium but raised in New Jersey, Luc Sante transformed himself from a pious, timid Belgian boy into a loutish American adolescent, who eschewed French while fantasizing about the pop star Françoise Hardy. To show how this transformation came about--and why it remained incomplete--The Factory of Facts combines family anecdote and ancestral legend; detailed forays into Belgian history, language, and religion; and deft synopses of the American character. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Reason You Walk

A Memoir

Author: Wab Kinew

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0143193562

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 7953

A moving story of father-son reconciliation told by a charismatic aboriginal star When his father was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer, Winnipeg broadcaster and musician Wab Kinew decided to spend a year reconnecting with the accomplished but distant aboriginal man who’d raised him. The Reason You Walk spans that 2012 year, chronicling painful moments in the past and celebrating renewed hopes and dreams for the future. As Kinew revisits his own childhood in Winnipeg and on a reserve in Northern Ontario, he learns more about his father's traumatic childhood at residential school. An intriguing doubleness marks The Reason You Walk, itself a reference to an Anishinaabe ceremonial song. Born to an Anishinaabe father and a non-native mother, he has a foot in both cultures. He is a Sundancer, an academic, a former rapper, a hereditary chief and an urban activist. His father, Tobasonakwut, was both a beloved traditional chief and a respected elected leader who engaged directly with Ottawa. Internally divided, his father embraced both traditional native religion and Catholicism, the religion that was inculcated into him at the residential school where he was physically and sexually abused. In a grand gesture of reconciliation, Kinew's father invited the Roman Catholic bishop of Winnipeg to a Sundance ceremony in which he adopted him as his brother. Kinew writes affectingly of his own struggles in his twenties to find the right path, eventually giving up a self-destructive lifestyle to passionately pursue music and martial arts. From his unique vantage point, he offers an inside view of what it means to be an educated aboriginal living in a country that is just beginning to wake up to its aboriginal history and living presence. Invoking hope, healing and forgiveness, The Reason You Walk is a poignant story of a towering but damaged father and his son as they embark on a journey to repair their family bond. By turns lighthearted and solemn, Kinew gives us an inspiring vision for family and cross-cultural reconciliation, and for a wider conversation about the future of aboriginal peoples.