Applying the Science of Learning

Author: Richard E. Mayer

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 134

View: 666

"For students studying ""education or psychology, for teachers or prospective teachers, and for instructional designers or instructors." "A concrete guide to the science of learning, instruction, and assessment written in a friendly tone and presented in a dynamic format. " The underlying premise of "Applying the Science of Learning "is that educators can better help students learn if they understand the processes through which student learning takes place. In this clear and concise first edition text, educational psychology scholar Richard Mayer teaches readers how to apply the science of learning through understanding the reciprocal relationships between learning, instruction, and assessment. Utilizing the significant advances in scientific learning research over the last 25 years, this introductory text identifies the features of science of learning that are most relevant to education, explores the possible prescriptions of these findings for instructional methods, and highlights the essentials of evaluating instructional effectiveness through assessment. "Applying the Science of Learning "is also presented in an easy-to-read modular design and with a conversational tone -- making it particularly student-friendly, whether it is being used as a supplement to a core textbook or as a standalone course textbook. Features: A concise and concentrated view of the field that covers the foundational ideas in learning, instruction, and assessment without overwhelming students or wasting words. A modular, multimedia approach organizes course material into two-page units with specific objectives, helpful graphics, and a welcoming design that helps readers organize and understand each concept. An emphasis on clear writing and concrete ideas makes learning easier for readers, especially by providing vocabulary definitions and specific examples. A personal and friendly tone instead of a formal, academic style make this book easier and more enjoyable to read. While few academic references clutter the text, key references and suggested readings are provided at the end of each section.

Applying the Science of Learning to University Teaching and Beyond

New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 89

Author: Milton D. Hakel

Publisher: Jossey-Bass

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 109

View: 445

It is sadly true that most of the way we teach and learn is uninformed by laboratory findings in human cognition. Although researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and social variables that mediate in the learning process, very little of this basic knowledge has been translated into practice, many research questions that are critically important for directing educational reform remain unanswered, and few in the scientific community have been actively involved in the efforts to reform higher education. This edited volume is among many recent attempts to build on empirically-validated learning activities to enhance what and how much is learned and how well and how long it is remembered. Thus, the movement for a real "Science of Learning" has taken hold-the application of scientific principles to the study of learning-both under the controlled conditions of the laboratory and in the messy real-world settings where most of us go about the business of learning. This is the 89th issue of the quarterly Jossey-Bass publication New Directions for Teaching and Learning.

Learning Science and the Science of Learning

Science Educators' Essay Collection

Author: Rodger W. Bybee

Publisher: NSTA Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 151

View: 275

Sure, you teach science. But do your students really learn it? Students of all ages will absorb more if you adapt the way you teach to the way they learn. That's the message of this thoughtful collection of 12 essays by noted science teachers. Based on the latest research, this is definitely a scholarly book. But to bring theories to life, it includes realistic scenarios featuring classrooms where students are encouraged to construct their own science learning. These scenarios will give you specific ideas on how to help your students become more reflective about their learning process, including what they know, what their stumbling blocks are, and how to overcome them. You'll also examine how to use formative assessment to gauge student learning during the course of a lesson, not just at the end.

The Science of Learning

A Systems Theory Perspective

Author: Robert T. Hays

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 437

View: 738

The Science of Learning: A Systems Theory Approach provides authoritative, comprehensive, learner-centric reviews and discussions of theories and research on learning processes, instructional approaches, and the uses of instructional media. It includes over 600 references to the most influential theoretical and empirical literature in the field. It also provides discussions on the scientific method and how to apply science and scientific thinking to the study of learning, the development of instruction, and the evaluation of instructional programs. The systems-theory orientation provided in the book helps the reader understand the diverse data on learning and helps to integrate these data into a rich knowledge base. The book also summarizes guidance on the application of learning research to enhance learning effectiveness and illustrates this guidance with real-world examples.

The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning

Author: Richard E. Mayer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 950

View: 215

The updated second edition of the only handbook to offer a comprehensive analysis of research and theory in the field of multimedia learning, or learning from words and images. It examines research-based principles to determine the most effective methods of multimedia instruction and uses cognitive theory to explain how these methods work.

Applying Science of Learning in Education

Infusing Psychological Science Into the Curriculum

Author: Sarah A. Ambrose

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cognitive learning

Page: 303

View: 486

"This edited book represents a sliver, albeit a substantial one, of the scholarship on the science of learning and its application in educational settings. Most of the work described in this book is based on theory and research in cognitive psychology. Although much, but not all, of what is presented is focused on learning in college and university settings, teachers of all academic levels may find the recommendations made by chapter authors of service. Authors wrote their chapters with nonexperts as the target audience - teachers who may have little or no background in science of learning, research-based approaches to teaching and learning, or even general principles of psychological science. The book is organized in three sections. The 14 chapters in Part 1 address important concepts, principles, theories, and research findings, and applications related to the science of learning. The four chapters in Part 2 focus on preparing faculty to apply science of learning principles in their courses. Finally, the six chapters in Part 3 provide examples of research that have been done in real academic settings and that have applied one or more science of learning principles." -- Book homepage