Anthropology Put to Work

Author: Richard G. Fox,Les Field

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847883338

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 5764

How do anthropologists work today and how will they work in future? While some anthropologists have recently called for a new "public" or "engaged" anthropology, profound changes have already occurred, leading to new kinds of work for a large number of anthropologists. The image of anthropologists "reaching out" from protected academic positions to a vaguely defined "public" is out of touch with the working conditions of these anthropologists, especially those junior and untenured. The papers in this volume show that anthropology is put to work in diverse ways today. They indicate that the new conditions of anthropological work require significant departures from canonical principles of cultural anthropology, such as replacing ethnographic rapport with multiple forms of collaboration. This volume's goal is to help graduate students and early-career scholars accept these changes without feeling something essential to anthropology has been lost. There really is no other choice for most young anthropologists.

Using Anthropology in the World

A Guide to Becoming an Anthropologist Practitioner

Author: Riall W. Nolan

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351856928

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 1693

Anthropologist practitioners work outside the confines of the university, putting their knowledge and skills to work on significant problems in a wide variety of different contexts. The demand for anthropologist practitioners is strong and growing; practice is in many ways the leading edge of anthropology today, and one of the most exciting aspects of the discipline. How can anthropology students prepare themselves to become practitioners? Specifically designed to help students, including those in more traditional training programs, prepare for a career in putting anthropology to work in the world, the book: - provides an introduction to the discipline of anthropology and an exploration of its role and contribution in today’s world; - outlines the shape of anthropological practice – what it is, how it developed historically, and what it looks like today; - describes how students of anthropology can prepare for a career in practice, with emphasis on the relationship between theory, method, and application; - includes short contributions from practitioners, writing on specific aspects of training, practice, and career planning; - sets out a framework for career planning, with specific and detailed discussions of finding and securing employment; - reviews some of the more salient challenges arising in the course of a practitioner career; and - concludes with a discussion of what the future of anthropological practice is likely to be. Using Anthropology in the World is essential reading for students interested in preparing themselves for the challenges and rewards of practice and application.

A Companion to the Anthropology of Education

Author: Bradley A. Levinson,Mica Pollock

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119111668

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 7216

A Companion to the Anthropology of Education presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of the field, exploring the social and cultural dimension of educational processes in both formal and nonformal settings. Explores theoretical and applied approaches to cultural practice in a diverse range of educational settings around the world, in both formal and non-formal contexts Includes contributions by leading educational anthropologists Integrates work from and on many different national systems of scholarship, including China, the United States, Africa, the Middle East, Colombia, Mexico, India, the United Kingdom, and Denmark Examines the consequences of history, cultural diversity, language policies, governmental mandates, inequality, and literacy for everyday educational processes

Anthropology Beyond Culture

Author: Richard G. Fox,Barbara J. King

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9781859735244

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 2179

Culture is a vexed concept within anthropology. From their earliest studies, anthropologists have often noted the emotional attachment of people to their customs, even in cases where this loyalty can make for problems. Do anthropologists now suffer the same kind of disability with respect to their continuing emotional attachment to the concept of culture? This book considers the state of the culture concept in anthropology and finds fault with a 'love it or leave it' attitude. Rather than pledging undying allegiance or summarily dismissing it, the volume argues that anthropology can continue with or without a concept of culture, depending on the research questions being asked, and, furthermore, that when culture is retained, no single definition of it is practical or necessary. Offering sensible solutions to a topic of hot debate, this book will be essential reading for anyone seeking to learn what a concept of culture can offer anthropology, and what anthropology can offer the concept of culture.

NAPA Bulletin, Careers in 21st Century Applied Anthropology

Perspectives from Academics and Practitioners

Author: N.A

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444306928

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 2611

The NAPA Bulletin series is dedicated to the practical problem-solving and policy applications of anthropological knowledge and methods. NAPA Bulletins are peer reviewed, and are distributed free of charge as a benefit of NAPA membership. The NAPA Bulletin seeks to: facilitate the sharing of information among practitioners, academics, and students be a useful document for practitioners contribute to the professional development of anthropologists seeking practitioner positions support the general interests of practitioners both within and outside the academy

Anthropology in Use

A Bibliographic Chronology of the Development of Applied Anthropology

Author: John Van Willigen

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780913178669

Category: Reference

Page: 150

View: 9738

First Published in 1980. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Plagues and Epidemics

Infected Spaces Past and Present

Author: D. Ann Herring,Alan C. Swedlund

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847887554

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 9231

Until recently, plagues were thought to belong in the ancient past. Now there are deep worries about global pandemics. This book presents views from anthropology about this much publicized and complex problem. The authors take us to places where epidemics are erupting, waning, or gone, and to other places where they have not yet arrived, but where a frightening story line is already in place. They explore public health bureaucracies and political arenas where the power lies to make decisions about what is, and is not, an epidemic. They look back into global history to uncover disease trends and look ahead to a future of expanding plagues within the context of climate change. The chapters are written from a range of perspectives, from the science of modeling epidemics to the social science of understanding them. Patterns emerge when people are engulfed by diseases labeled as epidemics but which have the hallmarks of plague. There are cycles of shame and blame, stigma, isolation of the sick, fear of contagion, and end-of-the-world scenarios. Plague, it would seem, is still among us.

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 150114331X

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5484

Recapturing Anthropology

Working in the Present

Author: Richard Gabriel Fox

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9780933452770

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 1137

The ten papers in this volume offer different versions of how and where anthropologists might work usefully in today's world, converging on the issue of how anthropology can best recapture the progressive character its basic concepts, such as "culture," once had. Together the authors demonstrate that a reinvigorated anthropology must recognize how the profession labors under an existing intellectual discipline, with its own political and economic history, on a global "shop floor."

Conceptualizing Iranian Anthropology

Past and Present Perspectives

Author: Shahnaz R. Nadjmabadi

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857456520

Category: Social Science

Page: 286

View: 3844

During recent years, attempts have been made to move beyond the Eurocentric perspective that characterized the social sciences, especially anthropology, for over 150 years. A debate on the “anthropology of anthropology” was needed, one that would consider other forms of knowledge, modalities of writing, and political and intellectual practices. This volume undertakes that challenge: it is the result of discussions held at the first organized encounter between Iranian, American, and European anthropologists since the Iranian Revolution of 1979. It is considered an important first step in overcoming the dichotomy between “peripheral anthropologies” versus “central anthropologies.” The contributors examine, from a critical perspective, the historical, cultural, and political field in which anthropological research emerged in Iran at the beginning of the twentieth century and in which it continues to develop today.

Liquidated

An Ethnography of Wall Street

Author: Karen Ho

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822391376

Category: Social Science

Page: 389

View: 3433

Financial collapses—whether of the junk bond market, the Internet bubble, or the highly leveraged housing market—are often explained as the inevitable result of market cycles: What goes up must come down. In Liquidated, Karen Ho punctures the aura of the abstract, all-powerful market to show how financial markets, and particularly booms and busts, are constructed. Through an in-depth investigation into the everyday experiences and ideologies of Wall Street investment bankers, Ho describes how a financially dominant but highly unstable market system is understood, justified, and produced through the restructuring of corporations and the larger economy. Ho, who worked at an investment bank herself, argues that bankers’ approaches to financial markets and corporate America are inseparable from the structures and strategies of their workplaces. Her ethnographic analysis of those workplaces is filled with the voices of stressed first-year associates, overworked and alienated analysts, undergraduates eager to be hired, and seasoned managing directors. Recruited from elite universities as “the best and the brightest,” investment bankers are socialized into a world of high risk and high reward. They are paid handsomely, with the understanding that they may be let go at any time. Their workplace culture and networks of privilege create the perception that job insecurity builds character, and employee liquidity results in smart, efficient business. Based on this culture of liquidity and compensation practices tied to profligate deal-making, Wall Street investment bankers reshape corporate America in their own image. Their mission is the creation of shareholder value, but Ho demonstrates that their practices and assumptions often produce crises instead. By connecting the values and actions of investment bankers to the construction of markets and the restructuring of U.S. corporations, Liquidated reveals the particular culture of Wall Street often obscured by triumphalist readings of capitalist globalization.

Applied Anthropology

Domains of Application

Author: Satish Kedia,John Van Willigen

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275978426

Category: Social Science

Page: 370

View: 8988

Two pioneers in the field of applied anthropology have compiled a groundbreaking, comprehensive anthology with numerous contributions from key figures of the anthropological world.

Abalone Tales

Collaborative Explorations of Sovereignty and Identity in Native California

Author: Les Field

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822391155

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 4111

For Native peoples of California, the abalone found along the state’s coast have remarkably complex significance as food, spirit, narrative symbol, tradable commodity, and material with which to make adornment and sacred regalia. The large mollusks also represent contemporary struggles surrounding cultural identity and political sovereignty. Abalone Tales, a collaborative ethnography, presents different perspectives on the multifaceted material and symbolic relationships between abalone and the Ohlone, Pomo, Karuk, Hupa, and Wiyot peoples of California. The research agenda, analyses, and writing strategies were determined through collaborative relationships between the anthropologist Les W. Field and Native individuals and communities. Several of these individuals contributed written texts or oral stories for inclusion in the book. Tales about abalone and their historical and contemporary meanings are related by Field and his coauthors, who include the chair and other members of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe; a Point Arena Pomo elder; the chair of the Wiyot tribe and her sister; several Hupa Indians; and a Karuk scholar, artist, and performer. Reflecting the divergent perspectives of various Native groups and people, the stories and analyses belie any presumption of a single, unified indigenous understanding of abalone. At the same time, they shed light on abalone’s role in cultural revitalization, struggles over territory, tribal appeals for federal recognition, and connections among California’s Native groups. While California’s abalone are in danger of extinction, their symbolic power appears to surpass even the environmental crises affecting the state’s vulnerable coastline.

Phyllis Kaberry and Me

Anthropology, History and Aboriginal Australia

Author: Sandy Toussaint

Publisher: Melbourne University

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 7665

This is the fascinating story of two women, both anthropologists, who worked with Aboriginal people in the Kimberley region of Western Australia one in the 1930s, the other in the 1980s and 1990s. It explores the past, present and future relationships between anthropologists and the people among whom they work.

Medicine, Rationality and Experience

An Anthropological Perspective

Author: Byron Good

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521425766

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 8231

Medicine supposedly offers a scientific account of the human body and of illness, and it follows that scientific medicine treats all forms of folk medicine as little more than superstitious practices. Professor Good argues that this impoverished perspective neglects many facets of Western medical practice and obscures its kinship with healing in other traditions. Drawing on his own anthropological research in America and the Middle East, his analysis of illness and medicine explores the role of cultural factors in the experience of illness and the practice of medicine.

Putting Stories to Work

Mastering Business Storytelling

Author: Shawn Callahan

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN: 0992338581

Category: Business & Economics

Page: N.A

View: 2891

The most successful leaders are story¬tellers. By mastering business storytelling, they achieve extraordinary business results. As a modern-day leader, you know you should develop this skill, but you don’t have the time to do this in an ad-hoc way. What you need is a practical, reliable method to follow, one that will allow your business to reap the benefits of storytelling as soon as possible. In Putting Stories to Work, Shawn Callahan gives you a clear process for mastering business storytelling. He rejects the thinking that storytelling has no place at work, reminding us that sharing stories is what we all do naturally, every day, and that it’s one of the most powerful tools for getting things done. You just need to adapt this natural superpower to boost your business. Shawn’s story mastery process of Discover, Remember, Share and Refresh is based on over two decades’ work with high-achieving global companies. In Putting Stories to Work, each step is spelled out in detail, backed up by research, and, needless to say, illustrated by plenty of great stories. Learn how to find and share stories to connect with new people. How to explain why change is needed. How to influence opinions and promote success. And much more. Most importantly, learn how to take the latent skill of storytelling and turn it into a potent business habit. Imagine your colleagues telling the story of how you took the most diverse and opinionated group of experts and had them all working towards the same goal. Or the one about how you persuaded the executive team to change their minds and got a great result for the business. Or the one where everyone got inspired and turned things around. Imagine that your people all know exactly what the company strategy is and how they’re making a difference to the organisation. As the successful film executive Peter Guber put it: ‘Storytelling is not show business. It’s good business’.

The Chrysanthemum and the Sword

Author: Ruth Benedict

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547525141

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 888

Essential reading for anyone interested in Japanese culture, this unsurpassed masterwork opens an intriguing window on Japan. Benedict’s World War II–era study paints an illuminating contrast between the culture of Japan and that of the United States. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword is a revealing look at how and why our cultures differ, making it the perfect introduction to Japanese history and customs.

Ethnographic Presents

Pioneering Anthropologists in the Papua New Guinea Highlands

Author: Terence E. Hays

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520077454

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 6554

Life on the frontier suggests excitement, danger, and heroism, not to mention backbreaking labor. All these aspects of exploring the unknown enliven Ethnographic Presents, where the frontier is the Highlands region of what is now Papua New Guinea - a part of the world largely unseen by Westerners as late as 1950. In the next five years a dozen or so pioneering anthropologists followed closely on the heels of "first contact" patrols. Their innovative fieldwork is well documented, and now, in an autobiographical collection that is intimate and richly detailed, we learn what these ethnographers experienced: what being on the frontier was like for them. The anthropologists featured in these seven new essays are Catherine H. Berndt, Ronald M. Berndt, Reo Fortune (by Ann McLean), Robert M. Glasse, Marie Reay, D'Arcy Ryan, and James B. Watson. Their pioneering ethnographic adventures are put in historical context by Terence Hays, and a concluding essay by Andrew Strathern points out that this early work among the peoples of the Central Highlands not only influenced all subsequent understanding of Highland cultures but also had a profound impact on the field of anthropology.