Anthropology Put to Work

Author: Les Field,Richard G. Fox

Publisher: Berg Publishers

ISBN: 1845206002

Category: Social Science

Page: 257

View: 6260

While some anthropologists have called for a new 'public' or 'engaged' anthropology, profound changes have already occurred, leading to new kinds of work for many anthropologists. The papers in this volume show that anthropology is put to work in diverse ways today.

Anthropology Put to Work

Author: Richard G. Fox,Les Field

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847883338

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3996

How do anthropologists work today and how will they work in future? While some anthropologists have recently called for a new "public" or "engaged" anthropology, profound changes have already occurred, leading to new kinds of work for a large number of anthropologists. The image of anthropologists "reaching out" from protected academic positions to a vaguely defined "public" is out of touch with the working conditions of these anthropologists, especially those junior and untenured. The papers in this volume show that anthropology is put to work in diverse ways today. They indicate that the new conditions of anthropological work require significant departures from canonical principles of cultural anthropology, such as replacing ethnographic rapport with multiple forms of collaboration. This volume's goal is to help graduate students and early-career scholars accept these changes without feeling something essential to anthropology has been lost. There really is no other choice for most young anthropologists.

A Companion to the Anthropology of Education

Author: Bradley A. Levinson,Mica Pollock

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119111668

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 9238

A Companion to the Anthropology of Education presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of the field, exploring the social and cultural dimension of educational processes in both formal and nonformal settings. Explores theoretical and applied approaches to cultural practice in a diverse range of educational settings around the world, in both formal and non-formal contexts Includes contributions by leading educational anthropologists Integrates work from and on many different national systems of scholarship, including China, the United States, Africa, the Middle East, Colombia, Mexico, India, the United Kingdom, and Denmark Examines the consequences of history, cultural diversity, language policies, governmental mandates, inequality, and literacy for everyday educational processes

Inside Cultures

A New Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Author: William Balee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315426471

Category: Social Science

Page: 340

View: 1304

This concise, contemporary, and inexpensive option for instructors of cultural anthropology breaks away from the traditional structure of introductory textbooks. Emphasizing the interaction between humans and their environment, the tension between human universals and cultural variation, and the impacts of colonialism on traditional cultures, Inside Cultures shows students how cultural anthropology can help us understand the complex, globalized world around us. This second edition: includes brand new material on a variety of subjects, including genomic studies, race and racism, cross-cultural issues of gender identity, terrorism and ethnography, and business anthropology; presents updated and enhanced discussions of medical anthropology, European colonialism and disease, the Atlantic slave trade, and much more; offers personal stories of the author’s fieldwork in Amazonia, sidebars illustrating fascinating cases of cultures in action, and other pedagogical elements such as timelines; is written is clear, supple prose that delights readers while informing them

Careers in 21st Century Applied Anthropology

Perspectives from Academics and Practitioners

Author: N.A

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444306928

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 8163

The NAPA Bulletin series is dedicated to the practicalproblem-solving and policy applications of anthropologicalknowledge and methods. NAPA Bulletins are peer reviewed, andare distributed free of charge as a benefit of NAPA membership. TheNAPA Bulletin seeks to: facilitate the sharing of information among practitioners,academics, and students be a useful document for practitioners contribute to the professional development of anthropologistsseeking practitioner positions support the general interests of practitioners both within andoutside the academy

Anthropology in Use

A Bibliographic Chronology of the Development of Applied Anthropology

Author: John Van Willigen

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780913178669

Category: Reference

Page: 150

View: 2599

First Published in 1980. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Made in Madagascar

Sapphires, Ecotourism, and the Global Bazaar

Author: Andrew Walsh

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442694750

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 2507

Since the 1990s, the Ankarana region of northern Madagascar has developed a reputation among globe-trotting gemstone traders and tourists as a source of some of the world's most precious natural wonders. Although some might see Ankarana's sapphire and ecotourist trades as being at odds with each other, many local people understand these trades to be fundamentally connected, most obviously in how both serve foreign demand for what Madagascar has to offer the world. Walsh explores the tensions and speculations that have come with the parallel emergence of these two trades with sensitivity and a critical eye, allowing for insights into globalization, inequality, and the appeal of the "natural." For more information, and to read a hyperlinked version of the first chapter online, visit www.madeinmadagascar.org.

Plagues and Epidemics

Infected Spaces Past and Present

Author: D. Ann Herring,Alan C. Swedlund

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847887554

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 8429

Until recently, plagues were thought to belong in the ancient past. Now there are deep worries about global pandemics. This book presents views from anthropology about this much publicized and complex problem. The authors take us to places where epidemics are erupting, waning, or gone, and to other places where they have not yet arrived, but where a frightening story line is already in place. They explore public health bureaucracies and political arenas where the power lies to make decisions about what is, and is not, an epidemic. They look back into global history to uncover disease trends and look ahead to a future of expanding plagues within the context of climate change. The chapters are written from a range of perspectives, from the science of modeling epidemics to the social science of understanding them. Patterns emerge when people are engulfed by diseases labeled as epidemics but which have the hallmarks of plague. There are cycles of shame and blame, stigma, isolation of the sick, fear of contagion, and end-of-the-world scenarios. Plague, it would seem, is still among us.

Applied Anthropology

Domains of Application

Author: Satish Kedia,John Van Willigen

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275978419

Category: Social Science

Page: 370

View: 8919

Two pioneers in the field of applied anthropology have compiled a groundbreaking, comprehensive anthology, which provides contributions from key figures of the anthropological world together in a single volume.

Violence at the Urban Margins

Author: Javier Auyero,Philippe Bourgois,Nancy Scheper-Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190221488

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 6348

In the Americas, debates around issues of citizen's public safety--from debates that erupt after highly publicized events, such as the shootings of Jordan Davis and Trayvon Martin, to those that recurrently dominate the airwaves in Latin America--are dominated by members of the middle and upper-middle classes. However, a cursory count of the victims of urban violence in the Americas reveals that the people suffering the most from violence live, and die, at the lowest of the socio-symbolic order, at the margins of urban societies. The inhabitants of the urban margins are hardly ever heard in discussions about public safety. They live in danger but the discourse about violence and risk belongs to, is manufactured and manipulated by, others--others who are prone to view violence at the urban margins as evidence of a cultural, or racial, defect, rather than question violence's relationship to economic and political marginalization. As a result, the experience of interpersonal violence among the urban poor becomes something unspeakable, and the everyday fear and trauma lived in relegated territories is constantly muted and denied. This edited volume seeks to counteract this pernicious tendency by putting under the ethnographic microscope--and making public--the way in which violence is lived and acted upon in the urban peripheries. It features cutting-edge ethnographic research on the role of violence in the lives of the urban poor in South, Central, and North America, and sheds light on the suffering that violence produces and perpetuates, as well as the individual and collective responses that violence generates, among those living at the urban margins of the Americas.

Ethnographic Presents

Pioneering Anthropologists in the Papua New Guinea Highlands

Author: Terence E. Hays

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520077454

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 6303

Life on the frontier suggests excitement, danger, and heroism, not to mention backbreaking labor. All these aspects of exploring the unknown enliven Ethnographic Presents, where the frontier is the Highlands region of what is now Papua New Guinea - a part of the world largely unseen by Westerners as late as 1950. In the next five years a dozen or so pioneering anthropologists followed closely on the heels of "first contact" patrols. Their innovative fieldwork is well documented, and now, in an autobiographical collection that is intimate and richly detailed, we learn what these ethnographers experienced: what being on the frontier was like for them. The anthropologists featured in these seven new essays are Catherine H. Berndt, Ronald M. Berndt, Reo Fortune (by Ann McLean), Robert M. Glasse, Marie Reay, D'Arcy Ryan, and James B. Watson. Their pioneering ethnographic adventures are put in historical context by Terence Hays, and a concluding essay by Andrew Strathern points out that this early work among the peoples of the Central Highlands not only influenced all subsequent understanding of Highland cultures but also had a profound impact on the field of anthropology.

Phyllis Kaberry and Me

Anthropology, History and Aboriginal Australia

Author: Sandy Toussaint

Publisher: Melbourne University

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 2222

This is the fascinating story of two women, both anthropologists, who worked with Aboriginal people in the Kimberley region of Western Australia one in the 1930s, the other in the 1980s and 1990s. It explores the past, present and future relationships between anthropologists and the people among whom they work.

Bullshit Jobs

Vom wahren Sinn der Arbeit

Author: David Graeber

Publisher: Klett-Cotta

ISBN: 3608115064

Category: Political Science

Page: 560

View: 7959

Ein Bullshit-Job ist eine Beschäftigungsform, die so völlig sinnlos, unnötig oder schädlich ist, dass selbst der Arbeitnehmer ihre Existenz nicht rechtfertigen kann. Es geht also gerade nicht um Jobs, die niemand machen will, sondern um solche, die eigentlich niemand braucht. Im Zuge des technischen Fortschritts sind zahlreiche Arbeitsplätze durch Maschinen ersetzt worden. Trotzdem ist die durchschnittliche Arbeitszeit nicht etwa gesunken, sondern auf durchschnittlich 41,5 Wochenstunden gestiegen. Wie konnte es dazu kommen? David Graeber zeigt in seinem bahnbrechenden neuen Buch, warum immer mehr überflüssige Jobs entstehen und welche verheerenden Konsequenzen diese Entwicklung für unsere Gesellschaft hat. Im Jahr 1930 sagte der britische Ökonom John Maynard Keynes voraus, dass durch den technischen Fortschritt heute niemand mehr als 15 Stunden pro Woche arbeiten müsse. Fast ein Jahrhundert danach stellt David Graeber fest, dass die Gegenwart anders aussieht: Die durchschnittliche Arbeitszeit ist gestiegen und immer mehr Menschen üben Tätigkeiten aus, die unproduktiv und daher eigentlich überflüssig sind – als Immobilienmakler, Investmentbanker oder Unternehmensberater. Es sind Jobs, die keinen sinnvollen gesellschaftlichen Beitrag leisten. Es sind Bullshit-Jobs. Warum bezahlt eine Ökonomie solche Tätigkeiten, die sie nicht braucht? Wie ist es zu dieser Entwicklung gekommen? Und was können wir dagegen tun? David Graeber, einer der radikalsten politischen Denker unserer Zeit, geht diesem Phänomen auf den Grund. Ein packendes Plädoyer gegen die Ausweitung sinnloser Arbeit, die die moralischen Grundfesten unserer Gesellschaft ins Wanken bringt.

The Oxford Handbook of International Human Rights Law

Author: Dinah Shelton

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191668982

Category: Law

Page: 1088

View: 8819

The Oxford Handbook of International Human Rights Law provides a comprehensive and original overview of one of the fundamental topics within international law. It contains substantial new essays by over forty leading experts in the field, giving students, scholars, and practitioners a complete overview of the issues that inform research and a "map" of the debates that animate the field. Each chapter features critical and up-to-date analysis of the current state of debate and discussion, assessing recent work, and advancing the understanding of all aspects of this developing area of international law. Addressing all aspects of international human rights law, the Handbook consists of over forty chapters, divided into seven parts. The first two sections explore the foundational theories and the historical antecedents of human rights law from a diverse set of disciplines, including the philosophical, religious, biological, and psychological origins of moral development and altruism, and sociological findings about cooperation and conflict. They also trace the historical sources of human rights through comparative and international law by conducting a case study of the anti-slavery movement. Section III focuses on the law-making process and certain categories of rights. Sections IV and V examine the normative and institutional evolution of human rights, and discuss its impact on various doctrines of general international law. The final two sections are more speculative, examining whether there is an advantage to considering major social problems from a human rights perspective and, if so, how that might be done. Section VI analyses several current problems that are being addressed by governments both domestically and through international organizations, and issues that have been placed on the human rights agenda of the United Nations, such as state responsibility for human rights violations and economic sanctions to enforce human rights. The final section then evaluates the impact of international human rights law over the past six decades from a variety of perspectives. The Handbook will be an invaluable resource for scholars, students, and practitioners of international human rights law. It provides the reader with new perspectives on international human rights law that are both multidisciplinary and geographically and culturally diverse. It should become the new standard reference work in this area.

Exotic No More

Anthropology on the Front Lines

Author: Jeremy MacClancy

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226500140

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 2281

Since its founding in the nineteenth century, social anthropology has been seen as the study of exotic peoples in faraway places. But today more and more anthropologists are dedicating themselves not just to observing but to understanding and helping solve social problems wherever they occur—in international aid organizations, British TV studios, American hospitals, or racist enclaves in Eastern Europe, for example. In Exotic No More, an initiative of the Royal Anthropological Institute, some of today's most respected anthropologists demonstrate, in clear, unpretentious prose, the tremendous contributions that anthropology can make to contemporary society. They cover issues ranging from fundamentalism to forced migration, child labor to crack dealing, human rights to hunger, ethnicity to environmentalism, intellectual property rights to international capitalisms. But Exotic No More is more than a litany of gloom and doom; the essays also explore topics usually associated with leisure or "high" culture, including the media, visual arts, tourism, and music. Each author uses specific examples from their fieldwork to illustrate their discussions, and 62 photographs enliven the text. Throughout the book, the contributors highlight anthropology's commitment to taking people seriously on their own terms, paying close attention to what they are saying and doing, and trying to understand how they see the world and why. Sometimes this bottom-up perspective makes the strange familiar, but it can also make the familiar strange, exposing the cultural basis of seemingly "natural" behaviors and challenging us to rethink some of our most cherished ideas—about gender, "free" markets, "race," and "refugees," among many others. Contributors: William O. Beeman Philippe Bourgois John Chernoff E. Valentine Daniel Alex de Waal Judith Ennew James Fairhead Sarah Franklin Michael Gilsenan Faye Ginsburg Alma Gottlieb Christopher Hann Faye V. Harrison Richard Jenkins Melissa Leach Margaret Lock Jeremy MacClancy Jonathan Mazower Ellen Messer A. David Napier Nancy Scheper-Hughes Jane Schneider Parker Shipton Christopher B. Steiner

Abalone Tales

Collaborative Explorations of Sovereignty and Identity in Native California

Author: Les Field

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822391155

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 5085

For Native peoples of California, the abalone found along the state’s coast have remarkably complex significance as food, spirit, narrative symbol, tradable commodity, and material with which to make adornment and sacred regalia. The large mollusks also represent contemporary struggles surrounding cultural identity and political sovereignty. Abalone Tales, a collaborative ethnography, presents different perspectives on the multifaceted material and symbolic relationships between abalone and the Ohlone, Pomo, Karuk, Hupa, and Wiyot peoples of California. The research agenda, analyses, and writing strategies were determined through collaborative relationships between the anthropologist Les W. Field and Native individuals and communities. Several of these individuals contributed written texts or oral stories for inclusion in the book. Tales about abalone and their historical and contemporary meanings are related by Field and his coauthors, who include the chair and other members of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe; a Point Arena Pomo elder; the chair of the Wiyot tribe and her sister; several Hupa Indians; and a Karuk scholar, artist, and performer. Reflecting the divergent perspectives of various Native groups and people, the stories and analyses belie any presumption of a single, unified indigenous understanding of abalone. At the same time, they shed light on abalone’s role in cultural revitalization, struggles over territory, tribal appeals for federal recognition, and connections among California’s Native groups. While California’s abalone are in danger of extinction, their symbolic power appears to surpass even the environmental crises affecting the state’s vulnerable coastline.

The Dial

Author: Marianne Moore

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Books

Page: N.A

View: 9747

A Companion to Cognitive Anthropology

Author: David B. Kronenfeld,Giovanni Bennardo,Victor C. de Munck,Michael D. Fischer

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444394924

Category: Social Science

Page: 624

View: 5519

A Companion to Cognitive Anthropology offers a comprehensive overview of the development of cognitive anthropology from its inception to the present day and presents recent findings in the areas of theory, methodology, and field research in twenty-nine key essays by leading scholars. Demonstrates the importance of cognitive anthropology as an early constituent of the cognitive sciences Examines how culturally shared and complex cognitive systems work, how they are structured, how they differ from one culture to another, how they are learned and passed on Explains how cultural (or collective) vs. individual knowledge distinguishes cognitive anthropology from cognitive psychology Examines recent theories and methods for studying cognition in real-world scenarios Contains twenty-nine key essays by leading names in the field