Anthropology

A Student's Guide to Theory and Method

Author: Stanley Barrett

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 952

Stanley R. Barrett's Anthropology has long been a premiere sourcebook for students, providing a comprehensive overview of both theory and method in the discipline. In this updated second edition, Barrett's discussion of the origins and evolution of anthropology remains, augmented by sections addressing recent changes and ongoing questions in the field. The second edition of Anthropology adds important new material on questions of culture versus power, Max Weber's thought, the potential of applied anthropology, and the rise of public anthropology, while briefly touching on the anthropology of globalization. As in the previous edition, Barrett remains committed to exploring the impact of postmodernism on the practice and theory of anthropology, positing that it is a formless and ultimately short-lived approach. Including case studies to demonstrate real-world applications of the theories discussed, Barrett's Anthropology remains an essential text for students and teachers of anthropology.

Practicing Ethnography

A Student Guide to Method and Methodology

Author: Lynda Mannik

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 110

Building on the "studying up" trend in anthropology, this book offers a theoretically informed guide to ethnographic methods that is also practical in approach, and reflects the challenges and concerns of contemporary ethnography. Students draw from vignettes situated within North America to learn how various methods work in the real world, and how ethnography informs contemporary anthropological theory. Exercises and assignments encourage students to practice these methods in a familiar context, and a sustained focus on visual methodologies offers coverage not found in other books. The result is a text that discusses both practical and theoretical issues in contemporary ethnography while equipping students with a set of transferable skills.

Trojan-Horse Aid

Seeds of Resistance and Resilience in the Bolivian Highlands and Beyond

Author: Susan Walsh

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 408

In a compelling first-hand account of development assistance gone awry, Susan Walsh recounts how national, international, and multilateral organizations failed the Jalq'a people in the Bolivian Andes during the early millennium. Intent on assisting potato farmers, development organizations pushed for changes that ultimately served their own interests, paradoxically undermining local resilience and pushing farmers off their lands. Trojan-Horse Aid challenges the idea of Western capacity-building, particularly the notion that introduced technologies related to food production are essential ingredients for sustainable livelihoods among farmers. Walsh argues that the well-intentioned organizations working in Jalq'a communities paid insufficient attention to longstanding knowledge that has supported human survival in regions where the natural world has the upper hand. Walsh goes beyond a critical review of misguided aid to offer reflections on the relationship between indigenous knowledge and resilience theory, the hopeful future of development assistance, and the contradictions in her own hybrid role as researcher and development-practitioner. In light of growing global concern over the worsening food crisis and interconnected climate extremes, Trojan-Horse Aid offers an important critique of development practices that undermine peasant strategies as well as suggestions for more effective approaches for the future.

A Guide to Careers in Physical Anthropology

Author: Alan S. Ryan

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 308

View: 735

Most students of physical anthropology have aspired to a research/teaching position at a university. However, because of the decline in the academic job market, there has been an increased interest in alternative careers. This collection describes career paths that physical anthropologists have chosen within and outside the academy.

Reader's Guide to Music

History, Theory and Criticism

Author: Murray Steib

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 928

View: 792

The Reader's Guide to Music is designed to provide a useful single-volume guide to the ever-increasing number of English language book-length studies in music. Each entry consists of a bibliography of some 3-20 titles and an essay in which these titles are evaluated, by an expert in the field, in light of the history of writing and scholarship on the given topic. The more than 500 entries include not just writings on major composers in music history but also the genres in which they worked (from early chant to rock and roll) and topics important to the various disciplines of music scholarship (from aesthetics to gay/lesbian musicology).

The Blackwell Guide to Research Methods in Bilingualism and Multilingualism

Author: Li Wei

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 424

View: 828

As globalization has increased awareness of the extent of language contact and linguistic diversity, questions concerning bilingualism and multilingualism have taken on an increasing importance from both practical and scholarly points of view. Written by leading experts and practitioners in the field, The Blackwell Guide to Research Methods in Bilingualism and Multilingualism: Highlights the interdisciplinary nature of research on bilingualism and multilingualism and offers a practical guide to the procedures and tools for collecting and analyzing data Specifically addresses methodological issues, discussing research topics, core concepts and approaches, and the methods and techniques available Links theory to method, and to data, and answers a real need for a know-how volume on bilingualism and multilingualism that deals with its methodology in a systematic and coherent way

Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology

An Encyclopedia

Author: R. Jon McGee

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1056

View: 345

Social and cultural anthropology and archaeology are rich subjects with deep connections in the social and physical sciences. Over the past 150 years, the subject matter and different theoretical perspectives have expanded so greatly that no single individual can command all of it. Consequently, both advanced students and professionals may be confronted with theoretical positions and names of theorists with whom they are only partially familiar, if they have heard of them at all. Students, in particular, are likely to turn to the web to find quick background information on theorists and theories. However, most web-based information is inaccurate and/or lacks depth. Students and professionals need a source to provide a quick overview of a particular theory and theorist with just the basics—the "who, what, where, how, and why," if you will. In response, SAGE Reference plans to publish the two-volume Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology: An Encyclopedia. Features & Benefits: Two volumes containing approximately 335 signed entries provide users with the most authoritative and thorough reference resource available on anthropology theory, both in terms of breadth and depth of coverage. To ease navigation between and among related entries, a Reader's Guide groups entries thematically and each entry is followed by Cross-References. In the electronic version, the Reader's Guide combines with the Cross-References and a detailed Index to provide robust search-and-browse capabilities. An appendix with a Chronology of Anthropology Theory allows students to easily chart directions and trends in thought and theory from early times to the present. Suggestions for Further Reading at the end of each entry and a Master Bibliography at the end guide readers to sources for more detailed research and discussion.

Using Anthropology in the World

A Guide to Becoming an Anthropologist Practitioner

Author: Riall W. Nolan

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 535

Anthropologist practitioners work outside the confines of the university, putting their knowledge and skills to work on significant problems in a wide variety of different contexts. The demand for anthropologist practitioners is strong and growing; practice is in many ways the leading edge of anthropology today, and one of the most exciting aspects of the discipline. How can anthropology students prepare themselves to become practitioners? Specifically designed to help students, including those in more traditional training programs, prepare for a career in putting anthropology to work in the world, the book: - provides an introduction to the discipline of anthropology and an exploration of its role and contribution in today’s world; - outlines the shape of anthropological practice – what it is, how it developed historically, and what it looks like today; - describes how students of anthropology can prepare for a career in practice, with emphasis on the relationship between theory, method, and application; - includes short contributions from practitioners, writing on specific aspects of training, practice, and career planning; - sets out a framework for career planning, with specific and detailed discussions of finding and securing employment; - reviews some of the more salient challenges arising in the course of a practitioner career; and - concludes with a discussion of what the future of anthropological practice is likely to be. Using Anthropology in the World is essential reading for students interested in preparing themselves for the challenges and rewards of practice and application.

Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts

A Guide to Research Practices

Author: Ruth Finnegan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 647

The study of oral traditions and verbal arts leads into an area of human culture to which anthropologists are increasingly turning their attention. Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts provides up-to-date guidance on how to approach the study of oral form and their performances, treating both the practicalities of fieldwork and the methods by which oral texts and performances can be observed, collected or analysed. It also relates to those current controversies about the nature of performance and of 'text'. Designed as a practical and systematic introduction to the processes and problems of researching in this area, this is an invaluable guide for students, and lecturers of anthropology and cultural studies and also for general readers who are interested in enjoying oral literature for its own sake.