The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology

Author: Kenneth J Gregory

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 648

View: 435

Geomorphology is the study of the Earth's diverse physical land-surface features and the dynamic processes that shape these features. Examining natural and anthropogenic processes, The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology is a comprehensive exposition of the fundamentals of geomorphology that examines form, process, and applications of the discipline. Organized into five substantive sections, the Handbook is an overview of: • Foundations and Relevance: including the nature and scope of geomorphology; the origins and development of geomorphology; the role and character of theory in geomorphology; geomorphology and environmental management; and geomorphology and society • Techniques and Approaches: including observations and experiments; geomorphological mapping; the significance of models; process and form; dating surfaces and sediment; remote sensing in geomorphology; GIS in geomorphology; biogeomorphology; human activity • Process and Environment: including the evolution of regolith; weathering; fluids, flows and fluxes; sediment transport and deposition; hill slopes; riverine environments; glacial geomorphology; periglacial environments; coastal environments; aeolian environments; tropical environments; karst and karst processes • Environmental Change: including landscape evolution and tectonics; interpreting quaternary environments; environmental change; disturbance and responses to geomorphic systems • Conclusion: including challenges and perspectives; and a concluding review The Handbook has contributions from 48 international authors and was initially organized by the International Association of Geomorphologists. This will be a much-used and much-cited reference for researchers in Geomorphology, Physical Geography and the Environmental Sciences.

Geomorphology of Desert Environments

Author: Anthony J. Parsons

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 831

View: 611

About one-third of the Earth’s land surface experiences a desert climate, and this area supports approximately 15% of the planet’s population. This percentage continues to grow, and with this growth comes the need to acquire and apply an understanding of desert geomorphology. Such an understanding is vital in managing scarce and fragile resources and in mitigating natural hazards. This authoritative reference book is comprehensive in its coverage of the geomorphology of desert environments, and is arranged thematically. It begins with an overview of global deserts, proceeds through treatments of weathering, hillslopes, rivers, piedmonts, lake basins, and aeolian surfaces, and concludes with a discussion of the role of climatic change. Written by a team of international authors, all of whom are active in the field, the chapters cover the spectrum of desert geomorphology.

The Scientific Nature of Geomorphology

Proceedings of the 27th Binghamton Symposium in Geomorphology, Held 27-29 September, 1996

Author: Bruce L. Rhoads

Publisher: Bruce Rhoads

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 481

View: 138

Geomorphology is a discipline which has traditionally been dominated by fieldwork. This volume is devoted to the philosophical and methodological components of the discipline. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive examination of contemporary perspectives on the scientific nature of geomorphology. The book should help unify and strengthen the disciplines by clarifying how geomorphology fits into the realm of the sciences, by examining its relationship to other sciences, by providing an improved understanding of methodological diversity in the discipline, and by identifying potential bases for disciplinary unity.

Encyclopedia of Geomorphology

Author: Andrew Goudie

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Geomorphology

Page: 1156

View: 354

The first such reference work in thirty-five years, this is a comprehensive guide to both specific landforms and the major types of processes that create them. This two-volume set provides a historical overview of the field, while exploring recent key discoveries about tectonic and climatic changes as well as the use of new techniques such as modeling, remote sensing, and process measurement. Written by a team of expert contributors from over thirty countries, the nearly 700 alphabetically arranged entries are cross-referenced, indexed, and include up-to-date suggestions for further reading. Fully illustrated with over 360 tables and illustrations, this will be the definitive reference source for students, researchers, and practitioners in geomorphology as well as geography, earth science, sedimentology, and environmental science.

Key Methods in Geography

Author: Nicholas Clifford

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 572

View: 307

Key Methods in Geography is an introduction for undergraduates to the principal methodological issues involved in the collection, analysis and presentation of geographical information. It provides an accessible primer, which will be used by students as a reference throughout their degree, on all issues from research design to presentation. A unique feature of the book is that it provides definitions of terms from both human geography and physical geography. Organized into four parts: Getting Started in Geographical Research; Data Collection in Human Geography; Data Collection in Physical Geography; Analyzing and Representing Geographical Data. Each chapter is comprised of a short definition, a summary of the principal arguments, a substantive 5,000-word discussion, the use of real-life examples, and annotated notes for further reading. The teaching of research methods is integral in all geography courses. Key Methods in Geography identifies the key analytical and observational strategies with which all geography undergraduates should be conversant.

Key Concepts in Geography

Author: Sarah Holloway

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 342

View: 629

Defining the key terms that inform the language of geography and define the geographical imagination: space, time, place, scale, landscape, this volume provides definitions of terms from both human and physical geography.

Geology and Geomorphology of Holocene Coastal Barriers of Brazil

Author: Sérgio R. Dillenburg

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 380

View: 174

This is the first book to cover the Holocene geology and geomorphology of the 9,200 kilometers of the Brazilian coast. It is written for third and fourth year undergraduates, post-graduate students, scientists and man- ers. It characterizes the Brazilian coast in terms of the Holocene geology, geomorphology, oceanographic and climatic conditions, and the location, morphology and evolution of the barrier types. Separate chapters outline the types of barriers and coastal dynamics in each state, beginning in the south and proceeding to the north. Some emphasis is placed on the stretches of coast where the detailed morphology and stratigraphy of b- riers has been previously determined. To date, the Brazilian coastal barriers have been largely ignored by the international community, partly perhaps because much of the past research has tended to concentrate on barrier islands, of which there are very few in Brazil. In contrast, the Brazilian coastal barriers display a much wider range of types than is generally assumed. The biggest and most spectacular transgressive dunefield barriers in the world exist in Brazil, and dominate the southern and northeastern coasts. Many have never been described - fore. This volume provides a wealth of information on Holocene barrier types, evolution and dynamics. It provides managers, ecologists, biologists and botanists with much needed information on the geology, geomorph- ogy and dynamics of the genesis, types, functioning and ecosystems of the Holocene barriers extending along the entire Brazilian coast.

Landscapes and Landforms of Hungary

Author: Dénes Lóczy

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 294

View: 194

This volume is the first comprehensive description of the most spectacular landforms of Hungary. It is a richly illustrated book which presents a collection of significant sites, capturing the geodiversity of Hungarian landscapes. The Landscapes and Landforms of Hungary discusses the effects of geomorphological features to the landscape, such as volcanism, weathering, fluvial or aeolian erosion, karst formation, gravitational movements, and others. The importance of the conservation of geomorphological heritage is underlined, as well as the importance of geomorphological heritage and conservation. This book can be used for undergraduate and graduate courses in geomorphology, physical geography, hydrogeography, and nature conservation. It will be of benefit to environmental scientists, geomorphologists, conservationists, among others.