Anaximander and the Origins of Greek Cosmology

Author: Charles H. Kahn

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872202559

Category: Philosophy

Page: 247

View: 6905

Through criticism and analysis of ancient traditions, Kahn reconstructs the pattern of Anaximander’s thought using historical methods akin to the reconstructive techniques of comparative linguists.

Anaximander

A Re-assessment

Author: Andrew Gregory

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472508920

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 9943

Anaximander, the sixth-century BCE philosopher of Miletus, is often credited as being the instigator of both science and philosophy. The first recorded philosopher to posit the idea of the boundless cosmos, he was also the first to attempt to explain the origins of the world and humankind in rational terms. Anaximander's philosophy encompasses theories of justice, cosmogony, geometry, cosmology, zoology and meteorology. Anaximander: A Re-assessment draws together these wide-ranging threads into a single, coherent picture of the man, his worldview and his legacy to the history of thought. Arguing that Anaximander's statements are both apodeictic and based on observation of the world around him, Andrew Gregory examines how Anaximander's theories can all be construed in such a way that they are consistent with and supportive of each other. This includes the tenet that the philosophical elements of Anaximander's thought (his account of the apeiron, the extant fragment) can be harmonised to support his views on the natural world. The work further explores how these theories relate to early Greek thought and in particular conceptions of theogony and meterology in Hesiod and Homer.

Anaximander in Context

New Studies in the Origins of Greek Philosophy

Author: Dirk L. Couprie,Robert Hahn,Gerard Naddaf

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791487784

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 8292

Places the development of Anaximander's thought within social, political, cosmological, astronomical, and technological contexts.

The First Scientist

Anaximander and His Legacy

Author: Carlo Rovelli

Publisher: Westholme Pub Llc

ISBN: 9781594161315

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 209

View: 587

Translated into English for the first time, an award-winning theoretical physicist discusses the theories of Anaximander, the sixth-century BC Greek philosopher, and examines the influence he had on scientific thinking in a historical and philosophical context.

Anaximander and the Architects

The Contributions of Egyptian and Greek Architectural Technologies to the Origins of Greek Philosophy

Author: Robert Hahn

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791447932

Category: Architecture

Page: 350

View: 7202

Uses textual and archaeological evidence to argue that emerging Egyptian and Greek architectural technologies were crucial to the origins and development of Greek philosophy.

Anaximander and the Architects

The Contributions of Egyptian and Greek Architectural Technologies to the Origins of Greek Philosophy

Author: Robert Hahn

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791447949

Category: Architecture

Page: 326

View: 8173

Uses textual and archaeological evidence to argue that emerging Egyptian and Greek architectural technologies were crucial to the origins and development of Greek philosophy.

The Beginning of Western Philosophy

Interpretation of Anaximander and Parmenides

Author: Martin Heidegger

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253015618

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 4421

Volume 35 of Heidegger’s Complete Works comprises a lecture course given at the University of Freiburg in 1932, five years after the publication of Being and Time. During this period, Heidegger was at the height of his creative powers, which are on full display in this clear and imaginative text. In it, Heidegger leads his students in a close reading of two of the earliest philosophical source documents, fragments by Greek thinkers Anaximander and Parmenides. Heidegger develops their common theme of Being and non-being and shows that the question of Being is indeed the origin of Western philosophy. His engagement with these Greek texts is as much of a return to beginnings as it is a potential reawakening of philosophical wonder and inquiry in the present.

On Anaximander

Author: William Arthur Heidel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy, Ancient

Page: 24

View: 4089

The origins of scientific thought

from Anaximander to Proclus, 600 B.C. to 300 A.D.

Author: Giorgio De Santillana

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 5578

Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy VI

Before Plato

Author: Anthony Preus

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791449554

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 9650

An anthology devoted to the intellectual developments that led up to the philosophy of Plato.

Anaximander

Author: Carlo Rovelli

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781594162626

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7449

"Marvelous. . . . A wonderful book."--Humana.Mente "Rovelli is the dream author to conduct us on this journey."--Nonfiction.fr "At this point in time, when the prestige of science is at a low and even simple issues like climate change are mired in controversy, Carlo Rovelli gives us a necessary reflection on what science is, and where it comes from. Rovelli is a deeply original thinker, so it is not surprising that he has novel views on the important questions of the nature and origin of science."--Lee Smolin, founding member and researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and author of The Trouble with Physics Winner of the Prix du Livre Haute Maurienne de l'Astronomie Carlo Rovelli, a leading theoretical physicist, uses the figure of Anaximander as the starting point for an examination of scientific thinking itself: its limits, its strengths, its benefits to humankind, and its controversial relationship with religion. Anaximander, the sixth-century BC Greek philosopher, is often called the first scientist because he was the first to suggest that order in the world was due to natural forces, not supernatural ones. He is the first person known to understand that the Earth floats in space; to believe that the sun, the moon, and the stars rotate around it--seven centuries before Ptolemy; to argue that all animals came from the sea and evolved; and to posit that universal laws control all change in the world. Anaximander taught Pythagoras, who would build on Anaximander's scientific theories by applying mathematical laws to natural phenomena. In the award-winning The First Scientist: Anaximander and His Legacy, translated here for the first time in English, Rovelli restores Anaximander to his place in the history of science by carefully reconstructing his theories from what is known to us and examining them in their historical and philosophical contexts. Rovelli demonstrates that Anaximander's discoveries and theories were decisive influences, putting Western culture on its path toward a scientific revolution. Developing this connection, Rovelli redefines science as a continuous redrawing of our conceptual image of the world. He concludes that scientific thinking--the legacy of Anaximander--is only reliable when it constantly tests the limits of our current knowledge.

Thinking in the Light of Time

Heidegger's Encounter with Hegel

Author: Karin de Boer,Karin Gwenda Boer

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791445051

Category: Philosophy

Page: 406

View: 650

Translated from the Dutch, this book offers a systematic interpretation of Heidegger's thought, focusing particularly on recently published works.

Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy VI

Before Plato

Author: Anthony Preus

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791449561

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 5642

An anthology devoted to the intellectual developments that led up to the philosophy of Plato.

The Apeiron of Anaximander

A Study in the Origin and Function of Metaphysical Ideas

Author: Paul Seligman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Metaphysics

Page: 181

View: 7956

Heaven and Earth in Ancient Greek Cosmology

From Thales to Heraclides Ponticus

Author: Dirk L. Couprie

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781441981165

Category: Science

Page: 262

View: 6275

In Miletus, about 550 B.C., together with our world-picture cosmology was born. This book tells the story. In Part One the reader is introduced in the archaic world-picture of a flat earth with the cupola of the celestial vault onto which the celestial bodies are attached. One of the subjects treated in that context is the riddle of the tilted celestial axis. This part also contains an extensive chapter on archaic astronomical instruments. Part Two shows how Anaximander (610-547 B.C.) blew up this archaic world-picture and replaced it by a new one that is essentially still ours. He taught that the celestial bodies orbit at different distances and that the earth floats unsupported in space. This makes him the founding father of cosmology. Part Three discusses topics that completed the new picture described by Anaximander. Special attention is paid to the confrontation between Anaxagoras and Aristotle on the question whether the earth is flat or spherical, and on the battle between Aristotle and Heraclides Ponticus on the question whether the universe is finite or infinite.

Infinity in the Presocratics

A Bibliographical and Philosophical Study

Author: L. Sweeney

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401027293

Category: Philosophy

Page: 255

View: 1704

Throughout the long centuries of western metaphysics the problem of the infinite has kept surfacing in different but important ways. It had confronted Greek philosophical speculation from earliest times. It appeared in the definition of the divine attributed to Thales in Diogenes Laertius (I, 36) under the description "that which has neither beginning nor end. " It was presented on the scroll of Anaximander with enough precision to allow doxographers to transmit it in the technical terminology of the unlimited (apeiron) and the indeterminate (aoriston). The respective quanti tative and qualitative implications of these terms could hardly avoid causing trouble. The formation of the words, moreover, was clearly negative or privative in bearing. Yet in the philosophical framework the notion in its earliest use meant something highly positive, signifying fruitful content for the first principle of all the things that have positive status in the universe. These tensions could not help but make themselves felt through the course of later Greek thought. In one extreme the notion of the infinite was refined in a way that left it appropriated to the Aristotelian category of quantity. In Aristotle (Phys. III 6-8) it came to appear as essentially re quiring imperfection and lack. It meant the capacity for never-ending increase. It was always potential, never completely actualized.