Anaximander

A Re-assessment

Author: Andrew Gregory

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 385

Anaximander, the sixth-century BCE philosopher of Miletus, is often credited as being the instigator of both science and philosophy. The first recorded philosopher to posit the idea of the boundless cosmos, he was also the first to attempt to explain the origins of the world and humankind in rational terms. Anaximander's philosophy encompasses theories of justice, cosmogony, geometry, cosmology, zoology and meteorology. Anaximander: A Re-assessment draws together these wide-ranging threads into a single, coherent picture of the man, his worldview and his legacy to the history of thought. Arguing that Anaximander's statements are both apodeictic and based on observation of the world around him, Andrew Gregory examines how Anaximander's theories can all be construed in such a way that they are consistent with and supportive of each other. This includes the tenet that the philosophical elements of Anaximander's thought (his account of the apeiron, the extant fragment) can be harmonised to support his views on the natural world. The work further explores how these theories relate to early Greek thought and in particular conceptions of theogony and meterology in Hesiod and Homer.

Anaximander and the Origins of Greek Cosmology

Author: Charles H. Kahn

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 247

View: 495

Through criticism and analysis of ancient traditions, Kahn reconstructs the pattern of Anaximander’s thought using historical methods akin to the reconstructive techniques of comparative linguists.

Anaximander and the Architects

The Contributions of Egyptian and Greek Architectural Technologies to the Origins of Greek Philosophy

Author: Robert Hahn

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 350

View: 432

Uses textual and archaeological evidence to argue that emerging Egyptian and Greek architectural technologies were crucial to the origins and development of Greek philosophy.

Anaximander in Context

New Studies in the Origins of Greek Philosophy

Author: Dirk L. Couprie

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 534

Places the development of Anaximander's thought within social, political, cosmological, astronomical, and technological contexts.

Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy VI

Before Plato

Author: John Peter Anton

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 843

An anthology devoted to the intellectual developments that led up to the philosophy of Plato.

Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy VI

Before Plato

Author: Anthony Preus

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 199

An anthology devoted to the intellectual developments that led up to the philosophy of Plato.

Greek Materialists: Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 640

Features information about the Greek philosophers Thales of Miletus (624-546 B.C.), Anaximander (c.611-546 B.C.), and Anaximenes of Miletus (c.545 B.C.). Notes that each of the philosophers believed that the universe consisted of material substance rather than being mental or spiritual. Describes the beliefs of each of the philosophers. Includes information about Scientific Pantheism.

The Beginning of Western Philosophy

Interpretation of Anaximander and Parmenides

Author: Martin Heidegger

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 564

Volume 35 of Heidegger’s Complete Works comprises a lecture course given at the University of Freiburg in 1932, five years after the publication of Being and Time. During this period, Heidegger was at the height of his creative powers, which are on full display in this clear and imaginative text. In it, Heidegger leads his students in a close reading of two of the earliest philosophical source documents, fragments by Greek thinkers Anaximander and Parmenides. Heidegger develops their common theme of Being and non-being and shows that the question of Being is indeed the origin of Western philosophy. His engagement with these Greek texts is as much of a return to beginnings as it is a potential reawakening of philosophical wonder and inquiry in the present.