American Scientist

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Greek letter societies

Page: N.A

View: 9089

The American Scientist and Diplomacy

Author: Mario Nabliba

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1503589838

Category: Computers

Page: 58

View: 9980

What does one intend to do with this book (The American scientist and Diplomacy)? It is a part of a new trend to teach an understanding of new science information technology that embraces diplomacy as a new culture in this new century, showing people that this new technology can bring people closer than ever before. It calls attention to what this book is about, to encourage and give an entrepreneur the vision to perform their profession and expand the business plan in the real world. That is the layout in this book. Please follow my curriculum above as an example of how this book will walk the talk. There are many people with great expectation for this book, and some look forward to endorsing it. Therefore, The American scientist and Diplomacy book will be useful for many people in the field of science/technology, and the content has very inspiring issues that one will need to care about.

Master Mechanics & Wicked Wizards

Images of the American Scientist as Hero and Villain from Colonial Times to the Present

Author: Glen Scott Allen

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 9781558497030

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1989

A wide-ranging examination of how scientists have been portrayed in American culture.

An American Scientist on the Research Frontier

Edward Morley, Community, and Radical Ideas in Nineteenth-Century Science

Author: Ralph R. Hamerla

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402040887

Category: Education

Page: 260

View: 960

Presents a study of the nineteenth-century American scientist Edward Williams Morley. This is a story of a man who lent his name to the Michelson and Morley Ether-Drift Experiment, and who conclusively established the atomic weight of oxygen. It is also the story of science in provincial America.

An American Scientist

The Autobiography of Gabor A. Somorjai with Mitch Jacoby

Author: Gabor Somorjai

Publisher: ArchwayPublishing

ISBN: 1480801461

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 268

View: 7310

As a young man, Gabor Somorjai couldn’t have known he would one day be forced to flee his native Hungary. But upheaval in Europe during and after World War II led him to the U.S. where he immersed himself in science and soon began building a research group at one of the powerhouses of scientific discovery. The timing couldn’t have been better. The Sputnik wakeup call that triggered the huge influx of government support for scientific research in the second half of the 20th century bolstered fundamental research programs like the one Somorjai established at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Key discoveries in his field—surface science—led the way to advances in catalysis know-how that underpin today’s energy storage and transformation technology and safeguard the environment. By revealing the unique ways microscopically thin layers of atoms and molecules control the chemistry and physics of surfaces, modern surface science also spawned rapid development in microelectronics, high-power computing, and communication and information technology. But the scientific impact of the field that Professor Somorjai shaped doesn’t end there. Key discoveries in surface science also supported the development of new medical instruments for non-invasive investigation of the human body, as well as tools and techniques for repairing organs and bones. These discoveries have helped increase our life expectancy and vastly improved our quality of life. Through a fascinating account of his life story, Gabor Somorjai leads us through the dramatic changes in science and technology that took hold during the last half century and are sure to influence our lives in the years to come.

Louis Agassiz

Creator of American Science

Author: Christoph Irmscher

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547577672

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 434

View: 7549

Traces the life of the nineteenth-century scientist who discovered how glaciers form, describing how he enlisted the American public to collect natural specimens for his museum, his work training a generation of scientists, and his staunchly racist views.

Exploring Animal Behavior

Readings from American Scientist

Author: Paul W. Sherman,John Alcock

Publisher: Sinauer Associates Incorporated

ISBN: 9781605351957

Category: Science

Page: 372

View: 1045

This anthology contains 37 articles published since 1974 in American Scientist, the journal of the scientific society Sigma Xi. While sequenced particularly to complement John Alcock's Animal Behavior, this readily comprehensible and richly illustrated reader can stand alone as a sampler of the excitement and diversity of research approaches and organisms that constitute the modern study of animal behavior.

American Science in the Age of Jackson

Author: George H. Daniels

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817307400

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7882

George Daniels studies the 56 scientists most published in the 16 scientific journals identified as national during the period 1815 to 1845 and shows how American scientists emerged from a disorganized group of amateurs into a professional body sharing a common orientation and common goals."

American Science Fiction and the Cold War

Literature and Film

Author: David Seed

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135953821

Category: Art

Page: 225

View: 6691

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

An American scientist in early Meiji Japan

the autobiographical notes of Thomas C. Mendenhall

Author: Thomas Corwin Mendenhall

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 89

View: 2465

An American Scientist

The Autobiography of Gabor A. Somorjai

Author: Gabor A. Somorjai

Publisher: Archway

ISBN: 9781480801479

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 250

View: 1704

As a young man, Gabor Somorjai couldn't have known he would one day be forced to flee his native Hungary. But upheaval in Europe during and after World War II led him to the U.S. where he immersed himself in science and soon began building a research group at one of the powerhouses of scientific discovery. The timing couldn't have been better. The Sputnik wakeup call that triggered the huge influx of government support for scientific research in the second half of the 20th century bolstered fundamental research programs like the one Somorjai established at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Key discoveries in his field-surface science-led the way to advances in catalysis know-how that underpin today's energy storage and transformation technology and safeguard the environment. By revealing the unique ways microscopically thin layers of atoms and molecules control the chemistry and physics of surfaces, modern surface science also spawned rapid development in microelectronics, high-power computing, and communication and information technology. But the scientific impact of the field that Professor Somorjai shaped doesn't end there. Key discoveries in surface science also supported the development of new medical instruments for non-invasive investigation of the human body, as well as tools and techniques for repairing organs and bones. These discoveries have helped increase our life expectancy and vastly improved our quality of life. Through a fascinating account of his life story, Gabor Somorjai leads us through the dramatic changes in science and technology that took hold during the last half century and are sure to influence our lives in the years to come.

Is American Science in Decline?

Author: Yu Xie,Alexandra A Killewald

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674065042

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 248

View: 2535

Alarmists argue that the United States urgently needs more and better-trained scientists to compete with the rest of the world. Their critics counter that, far from facing a shortage, we are producing a glut of young scientists with poor employment prospects. Both camps have issued reports in recent years that predict the looming decline of American science. Drawing on their extensive analysis of national data sets, Yu Xie and Alexandra Killewald have welcome news to share: American science is in good health. "Is American Science in Decline?" does reveal areas of concern, namely scientists low earnings, the increasing competition they face from Asia, and the declining number of doctorates who secure academic positions. But the authors argue that the values inherent in American culture make the country highly conducive to science for the foreseeable future. They do not see globalization as a threat but rather a potential benefit, since it promotes efficiency in science through knowledge-sharing. In an age when other countries are catching up, American science will inevitably become less dominant, even though it is not in decline relative to its own past. As technology continues to change the American economy, better-educated workers with a range of skills will be in demand. So as a matter of policy, the authors urge that science education not be detached from general education."

Exploring Evolutionary Biology

Readings from American Scientist

Author: Montgomery Slatkin

Publisher: Sinauer Associates Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 305

View: 3146

Featuring a collection of articles from American Scientist between 1983 and 1995, this book is intended to serve as supplementary reading in evolutionary biology and to introduce the reader to modern research topics in the field. The articles are by leading research scientists and illustrate the diversity of problems that evolutionary biologists encounter along the way to understanding the history of living things and the processes that govern evolutionary change.

American Scientists

Author: Charles W. Carey

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438108079

Category: Scientists

Page: 449

View: 452

Profiles more than 200 American men and women who made significant contributions to science during the twentieth century.

Latin American Science Fiction

Theory and Practice

Author: M. Ginway,J. Brown

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137312777

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 241

View: 5387

Combining work by critics from Latin America, the USA, and Europe, Latin American Science Fiction: Theory and Practice is the first anthology of articles in English to examine science fiction in all of Latin America, from Mexico and the Caribbean to Brazil and the Southern Cone. Using a variety of sophisticated theoretical approaches, the book explores not merely the development of a science fiction tradition in the region, but more importantly, the intricate ways in which this tradition has engaged with the most important cultural and literary debates of recent year.

American Scientists and Nuclear Weapons Policy

Author: Robert Gilpin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400875463

Category: Political Science

Page: 364

View: 632

As this study traces the history of the dramatic intra-scientific conflict over nuclear weapons which has developed since World War II, it analyzes the politically relevant ideas, attitudes, and behavior of those scientists who have been influential in the formulation of American policy toward nuclear weapons. The author contends that the emergence of the scientist into the mainstream of American political life is one of the great events of our history. As he assays the situation, he emphasizes the growing need for effective measures for integrating scientist-advisers into national policy-making processes. This well documented book will be of lasting value to both scientists and public administrators, and it will be of vital interest to all concerned with current problems of the nuclear era. Originally published in 1962. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

H.H. LAUGHLIN

American Scientist. American Progressive. Nazi Collaborator.

Author: A.E. Samaan

Publisher: A.E. Samaan

ISBN: 0996416315

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 1839

Harry Hamilton Laughlin was highly important for the Nazi crusade to breed a “master race.” This American positioned himself to have a significant effect on the world’s population. During his career Laughlin would: 1.) Write the “Model Eugenical Law” that the Nazis used to draft portions of the Nuremberg decrees that led to The Holocaust. 2.) Be appointed as “expert” witness for the U.S. Congress when the 1924 Immigration Restriction Act was passed. The 1924 Act would prevent many Jewish refugees from reaching the safety of U.S. shores during The Holocaust. 3.) Provide the "scientific" basis for the 1927 Buck v. Bell Supreme Court case that made "eugenic sterilization" legal in the United States. This paved the way for 80,000 Americans to be sterilized against their will. 4.) Defend Hitler's Nuremberg decrees as “scientifically” sound in order to dispel international criticism. 5.) Create the political organization that ensured that the “science” of eugenics would survive the negative taint of The Holocaust. This organization would be instrumental in the Jim Crow era of legislative racism. H.H. Laughlin was given an honorary degree from Heidelberg University by Hitler's government, specifically for these accomplishments. Yet, no one has ever written a book on Laughlin. Despite the very large amount of books about The Holocaust, Laughlin is largely unknown outside of academic circles. The Carnegie Institution of Washington, D.C. gave this author permission to survey its internal correspondence leading up to The Holocaust and before the Institution retired Laughlin. These documents have not been seen for decades. They are the backbone of this book. The storyline intensifies as the Carnegie leadership comes to the horrible realization that one of its most recognized scientists was supporting Hitler’s regime. IMPORTANT NOTE: This copy is an A.R.C. (Advanced Readers' Copy). It is an edited preliminary to the hardcover version that will be published when all the books in the series are finished. This softcover version will only be different from the final as the research for the other books in the series dictate. The first book of the series is titled “From a ‘Race of Masters’ to a ‘Master Race’: 1948 to 1848”. It can be found here on Amazon.com. That first book of the series is an A.R.C. as well. All A.R.C. versions will be retired upon the publishing of the hardcover versions.