American Epic

The First Time America Heard Itself

Author: Bernard MacMahon

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 288

View: 906

The companion book to the groundbreaking PBS and BBC documentary series celebrating the pioneers and artists of American roots music—blues, gospel, folk, Cajun, Appalachian, Hawaiian, Native American—without which there would be no jazz, rock, country R&B, or hip hop today. Jack White, T. Bone Burnett, and Robert Redford have teamed up to executive produce American Epic, a historical music project exploring the pivotal recording journeys of the early twentieth century, which for the first time captured the breadth of American music and made it available to the world. It was, in a very real way, the first time America truly heard herself. In the 1920s and 1930s, as radio took over the pop music business, record companies were forced to leave their studios in major cities in search of new styles and markets. Ranging the mountains, prairies, rural villages, and urban ghettos of America, they discovered a wealth of unexpected talent—farmers, laborers, and ethnic minorities playing styles that blended the intertwining strands of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These recordings form the bedrock for modern music as we know it, but during the Depression many record companies went out of business and more than ninety percent of the fragile 78 rpm discs were destroyed. Fortunately, thanks to the continuing efforts of cultural detectives and record devotees, the stories of America’s earliest musicians can finally be told. Bernard MacMahon and Allison McGourty, who directed and produced the documentary with American musician Duke Erikson, spent years traveling around the US in search of recollections of those musical pioneers. Their fascinating account, written with the assistance of prize-winning author Elijah Wald, continues the journey of the series and features additional stories, never-before-seen photographs, and unearthed artwork. It also contains contributions from many of the musicians who participated including Taj Mahal, Nas, Willie Nelson, and Steve Martin, plus a behind-the-scenes look at the incredible journey across America. American Epic is an extraordinary testament to our country’s musical roots, the transformation of our culture, and the artists who gave us modern popular music.

The American Epic

Transforming a Genre, 1770-1860

Author: John P. McWilliams, Jr

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 539

John McWilliams's 1990 book was the first thorough account of the many attempts to fashion an epic literature (the anxiously anticipated 'American Epic') from a wide range of potentially heroic New World subjects.

American Epic

Reading the U.S. Constitution

Author: Garrett Epps

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 417

In 1987, E.L. Doctorow celebrated the Constitution's bicentennial by reading it. "It is five thousand words long but reads like fifty thousand," he said. Distinguished legal scholar Garrett Epps--himself an award-winning novelist--disagrees. It's about 7,500 words. And Doctorow "missed a good deal of high rhetoric, many literary tropes, and even a trace of, if not wit, at least irony," he writes. Americans may venerate the Constitution, "but all too seldom is it read." In American Epic, Epps takes us through a complete reading of the Constitution--even the "boring" parts--to achieve an appreciation of its power and a holistic understanding of what it says. In this book he seeks not to provide a definitive interpretation, but to listen to the language and ponder its meaning. He draws on four modes of reading: scriptural, legal, lyric, and epic. The Constitution's first three words, for example, sound spiritual--but Epps finds them to be more aspirational than prayer-like. "Prayers are addressed to someone . . . either an earthly king or a divine lord, and great care is taken to name the addressee. . . . This does the reverse. The speaker is 'the people,' the words addressed to the world at large." He turns the Second Amendment into a poem to illuminate its ambiguity. He notices oddities and omissions. The Constitution lays out rules for presidential appointment of officers, for example, but not removal. Should the Senate approve each firing? Can it withdraw its "advice and consent" and force a resignation? And he challenges himself, as seen in his surprising discussion of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in light of Article 4, which orders states to give "full faith and credit" to the acts of other states. Wry, original, and surprising, American Epic is a scholarly and literary tour de force.

An American Epic

Introduction. The relief of Belgium and Northern France 1914 - 1930

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 477

View: 881

The Bonus Army

An American Epic

Author: Paul Dickson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 115

In the summer of 1932, at the height of the Depression, some forty-five thousand veterans of World War I descended on Washington, D.C., from all over the country to demand the bonus promised them eight years earlier for their wartime service. President Herbert Hoover, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur, and others feared the protesters would turn violent after the Senate defeated the "bonus bill" that the House had passed. On July 28, 1932, tanks rolled through the streets as MacArthur's troops evicted the bonus marchers: Newspapers and newsreels showed graphic images of American soldiers driving out their former comrades in arms. Through seminal research, including interviews with the last surviving witnesses, Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen tell the full and dramatic story of the Bonus Army and of the many celebrated figures involved in it: Evalyn Walsh McLean, the owner of the hope diamond, sided with the marchers; Roy Wilkins saw the model for racial integration here; J. Edgar Hoover built his reputation against the Bonus Army radicals; a young Gore Vidal witnessed the crisis while John dos Passos, Sherwood Anderson, and Sinclair Lewis wrote about it. Dickson and Allen also recover the voices of ordinary men who dared tilt at powerful injustice, and who ultimately transformed the nation: The march inspired Congress to pass the G. I. Bill of Rights in 1944, one of the most important pieces of social legislation in our history, which in large part created America's middle class. The Bonus Army is an epic story in the saga of our country.

Billy Gashade

An American Epic

Author: Loren D. Estleman

Publisher: Forge Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 276

Billy Gashade is a wandering musician crossing the young United States in the late 1800s, and introducing us to its most colorful characters along the way. Calamity Jane, Billy the Kid, Chief Crazy Horse, Oscar Wilde, and many many more cross paths with Billy in this sweeping epic of American History from Loren D. Estleman. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Guggenheims

An American Epic

Author: John H. Davis

Publisher: SP Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 466

View: 630

This definitive portrait of one of America's wealthiest, most influential dynasties traces their dynamic and often tragic lives. 'The Guggenheims': Meyer Guggenheim, the penniless immigrant whose genius for business and penchant for taking risks made the family fortune; Solomon Guggenheim, the pioneer art patron who commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build the revolutionary piece of modern architecture, The Guggenheim Museum, opening the doors of contemporary art to America; Peggy Guggenheim, self-styled 'first liberated woman' who built a Venetian palace for her art but lost both her daughter and her lover to suicide; Daniel & Harry Guggenheim, whose financial interest in rocket science supported the Apollo moon landing and the growth of America's modern space program; Roger W Straus Jr, grandson of Daniel Guggenheim, who became America's foremost literary publisher, bringing numerous Nobel Prize Winning authors to the world's bookshelves. Updated with the latest from the heirs to the Guggenheim dynasty and illustrated throughout with rare family photos, John Davis has chronicled the saga of one of America's first families of philanthropy.