America's Uncivil Wars

The Sixties Era from Elvis to the Fall of Richard Nixon

Author: Mark H. Lytle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 727

'America's Uncivil Wars' explores the social & cultural issues that preoccupied America in the years 1954-1974.

Long Sixties

From 1960 to Barack Obama

Author: Tom Hayden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 171

In this unique and compelling book Tom Hayden argues that Barack Obama would not have been able to mount a successful presidential campaign without the movements of the 1960s. The Long Sixties shows that movements throughout history triumph over Machiavellians, gaining social reforms while leaving both revolutionaries and reactionaries frustrated. Hayden argues that the 1960s left a critical imprint on America, from civil rights laws to the birth of the environmental movement, and forced open the political process to women and people of colour. He urges President Obama to continue this legacy with a popular programme of economic recovery, green jobs and health care reform. The Long Sixties is a carefully researched history which will be of interest to activists, journalists and historians as the fiftieth anniversary of the 1960s begins.

Modern Wittenberg

Author: William A. Kinnison

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 985

Whatever happened to America's small, private, residential, undergraduate, Liberal Arts Colleges? Will they survive the present contest with pragmatic publicly supported community colleges and the secular mega universities? The story of Wittenberg, one of the best of Ohio's many good Liberal Arts Colleges, provides answers to such questions. It looks at this critical period in their history giving hope that the very best of them will prosper. They are an endangered national resource that should be preserved and no more of them are being started. The book is written both for the casual reader and for historians and professional educators.

America in the 1960s

Author: Edmund Lindop

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 753

Outlines the important social, political, economic, cultural, and technological events that happened in the United States from 1960 to 1969.

Stopping the Plant

The St. Lawrence Cement Controversy and the Battle for Quality of Life in the Hudson Valley

Author: Miriam D. Silverman

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 194

View: 290

Detailed account of the controversy surrounding the building of a coal-fired cement factory in the Hudson Valley.

The United States Since 1945

A Documentary Reader

Author: Robert P. Ingalls

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 477

Encompassing political, social, and cultural issues, this primary source reader allows students to hear the voices of the past, giving a richer understanding of American society since 1945. Comprises over 50 documents, which incorporate political, social, and cultural history and encompass the viewpoints of ordinary people as well a variety of leaders An extended introduction explains to students how to think and work like historians by using primary sources Includes both written texts and photographs Headnotes contextualize the documents and questions encourage students to engage critically with the sources

The Untold History of the United States

Author: Oliver Stone

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 156

“Indispensable… There is much here to reflect upon.” —President Mikhail Gorbachev “As riveting, eye-opening, and thought-provoking as any history book you will ever read. . . . Can’t recommend it highly enough.” —Glenn Greenwald, The Guardian “Finally, a book with the guts to challenge the accepted narrative of recent American history.” —Bill Maher The New York Times bestselling companion to the Showtime documentary series now streaming on Netflix, updated to cover the past five years. A PEOPLE’S HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE In this riveting companion to their astonishing documentary series—including a new chapter and new photos covering Obama’s second term, Trump’s first year and a half, climate change, nuclear winter, Korea, Russia, Iran, China, Lybia, ISIS, Syria, and more—Academy Award–winning director Oliver Stone and renowned historian Peter Kuznick challenge prevailing orthodoxies to reveal the dark truth about the rise and fall of American imperialism.

Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks

The Countercultural Sounds of Austin's Progressive Country Music Scene

Author: Travis D. Stimeling

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 192

View: 622

Country music of the late 1960s and early 1970s was a powerful symbol of staunch conservative resistance to the emerging counterculture. But starting around 1972, the city of Austin, Texas became host to a growing community of musicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, and fans who saw country music as a part of their collective heritage and sought to merge it with countercultural ideals to forge a distinctly Texan counterculture. Progressive country music-a hybrid of country music and rock-blossomed in this growing Austin community, as it played out the contradictions at work among its residents. The music was at once firmly grounded in the traditional Texan culture in which they had been raised, and profoundly affected by their newly radicalized, convention-flouting ways. In Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks: The Countercultural Sounds of Austin's Progressive Country Music Scene, Travis Stimeling connects the local Austin culture and the progressive music that became its trademark. He presents a colorful range of evidence, from behavior and dress, to newspaper articles, to personal interviews of musicians. Along the way, Stimeling uncovers parodies of the cosmic cowboy image that reinforce the longing for a more peaceful way of life, but that also recognize an awareness of the muddled, conflicted nature of this counterculture identity. Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks provides new insight into the inner workings of Austin's progressive country music scene-by bringing the music and musicians brilliantly to life.

Cult Film Stardom

Offbeat Attractions and Processes of Cultification

Author: K. Egan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 354

The term 'cult film star' has been employed in popular journalistic writing for the last 25 years, but what makes cult stars distinct from other film stars has rarely been addressed. This collection explores the processes through which film stars/actors become associated with the cult label, from Bill Murray to Ruth Gordon and Ingrid Pitt.

Madness Is Civilization

When the Diagnosis Was Social, 1948-1980

Author: Michael E. Staub

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 620

In the 1960s and 1970s, a popular diagnosis for America’s problems was that society was becoming a madhouse. In this intellectual and cultural history, Michael E. Staub examines a time when many believed insanity was a sane reaction to obscene social conditions, psychiatrists were agents of repression, asylums were gulags for society’s undesirables, and mental illness was a concept with no medical basis. Madness Is Civilization explores the general consensus that societal ills—from dysfunctional marriage and family dynamics to the Vietnam War, racism, and sexism—were at the root of mental illness. Staub chronicles the surge in influence of socially attuned psychodynamic theories along with the rise of radical therapy and psychiatric survivors' movements. He shows how the theories of antipsychiatry held unprecedented sway over an enormous range of medical, social, and political debates until a bruising backlash against these theories—part of the reaction to the perceived excesses and self-absorptions of the 1960s—effectively distorted them into caricatures. Throughout, Staub reveals that at stake in these debates of psychiatry and politics was nothing less than how to think about the institution of the family, the nature of the self, and the prospects for, and limits of, social change. The first study to describe how social diagnostic thinking emerged, Madness Is Civilization casts new light on the politics of the postwar era.