America's Bitter Pill

Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System

Author: Steven Brill

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 553

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK • America’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s acclaimed book on how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. It’s a fly-on-the-wall account of the titanic fight to pass a 961-page law aimed at fixing America’s largest, most dysfunctional industry. It’s a penetrating chronicle of how the profiteering that Brill first identified in his trailblazing Time magazine cover story continues, despite Obamacare. And it is the first complete, inside account of how President Obama persevered to push through the law, but then failed to deal with the staff incompetence and turf wars that crippled its implementation. But by chance America’s Bitter Pill ends up being much more—because as Brill was completing this book, he had to undergo urgent open-heart surgery. Thus, this also becomes the story of how one patient who thinks he knows everything about healthcare “policy” rethinks it from a hospital gurney—and combines that insight with his brilliant reporting. The result: a surprising new vision of how we can fix American healthcare so that it stops draining the bank accounts of our families and our businesses, and the federal treasury. Praise for America’s Bitter Pill “A tour de force . . . a comprehensive and suitably furious guide to the political landscape of American healthcare . . . persuasive, shocking.”—The New York Times “An energetic, picaresque, narrative explanation of much of what has happened in the last seven years of health policy . . . [Brill] has pulled off something extraordinary.”—The New York Times Book Review “A thunderous indictment of what Brill refers to as the ‘toxicity of our profiteer-dominated healthcare system.’ ”—Los Angeles Times “A sweeping and spirited new book [that] chronicles the surprisingly juicy tale of reform.”—The Daily Beast “One of the most important books of our time.”—Walter Isaacson “Superb . . . Brill has achieved the seemingly impossible—written an exciting book about the American health system.”—The New York Review of Books From the Hardcover edition.

The Business, Policy, and Economics of Neurosurgery

Author: Richard P. Menger, MD, MPA

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 330

View: 117

The concept of this project is based on the premise that neurosurgeons are vital agents in the application of the American health care apparatus. They remain the true advocates for patients undergoing surgery for a neurological condition. Yet, the tenets of health care economics, health care policy, and the business of medicine remain largely debated within the context of politicians, policy experts, and administrators. This textbook will ease that gap. It will bring material generally absent from medical curricula into discussion. It will make potent features of health care economics, policy, and the business of practice digestible to clinical neurosurgeons in order to help them better treat their patients. The information provided in this text will also provide an excellent foundation for understanding the mechanics of running a neurosurgical practice. It simultaneously addresses career progression and opportunity evaluation.

The Dysfunctional Politics of the Affordable Care Act

Author: Greg M. Shaw

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 949

While analyzing the contentious debate over health care reform, this much-needed study also challenges the argument that treating medical patients like shoppers can significantly reduce health expenditures. • Explains why the two political parties have staked out such different positions on health care reform • Documents what the public knows about the Affordable Care Act and how individuals' party identification significantly affects their knowledge • Challenges the arguments for consumer-driven health care plans by gathering evidence from numerous studies of consumer behavior under various kinds of insurance plans • Offers a well-informed critique of the political arguments surrounding the expansion of Medicaid, showing how this policy diffusion leverages the weak arguments and evidence for consumer-driven health care plans

Liberty and Coercion

The Paradox of American Government from the Founding to the Present

Author: Gary Gerstle

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 966

American governance is burdened by a paradox. On the one hand, Americans don't want "big government" meddling in their lives; on the other hand, they have repeatedly enlisted governmental help to impose their views regarding marriage, abortion, religion, and schooling on their neighbors. These contradictory stances on the role of public power have paralyzed policymaking and generated rancorous disputes about government’s legitimate scope. How did we reach this political impasse? Historian Gary Gerstle, looking at two hundred years of U.S. history, argues that the roots of the current crisis lie in two contrasting theories of power that the Framers inscribed in the Constitution. One theory shaped the federal government, setting limits on its power in order to protect personal liberty. Another theory molded the states, authorizing them to go to extraordinary lengths, even to the point of violating individual rights, to advance the "good and welfare of the commonwealth." The Framers believed these theories could coexist comfortably, but conflict between the two has largely defined American history. Gerstle shows how national political leaders improvised brilliantly to stretch the power of the federal government beyond where it was meant to go—but at the cost of giving private interests and state governments too much sway over public policy. The states could be innovative, too. More impressive was their staying power. Only in the 1960s did the federal government, impelled by the Cold War and civil rights movement, definitively assert its primacy. But as the power of the central state expanded, its constitutional authority did not keep pace. Conservatives rebelled, making the battle over government’s proper dominion the defining issue of our time. From the Revolution to the Tea Party, and the Bill of Rights to the national security state, Liberty and Coercion is a revelatory account of the making and unmaking of government in America.

Exceptional America

What Divides Americans from the World and from Each Other

Author: Mugambi Jouet

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 622

Why does a country built on the concept of liberty have the highest incarceration rate in the world? How could the first Western nation to elect a person of color as its leader suffer from institutional racism? How does Christian fundamentalism coexist with gay marriage in the American imagination? In essence, what makes the United States exceptional? In this provocative exploration of American exceptionalism, Mugambi Jouet examines why Americans are far more divided than other Westerners over basic issues—including wealth inequality, health care, climate change, evolution, the literal truth of the Bible, abortion, gay rights, gun control, mass incarceration, and war. Drawing inspiration from Alexis de Tocqueville, Jouet, raised in Paris by a French mother and a Kenyan father, wields his multicultural sensibility to parse the ways in which the intense polarization of U.S. conservatives and liberals has become a key dimension of American exceptionalism—an idea widely misunderstood to mean American superiority. Instead, Jouet contends that exceptionalism, once a source of strength, may now spell decline, as unique features of U.S. history, politics, law, culture, religion, and race relations foster grave conflicts and injustices. This book offers a brilliant dissection of the American soul, in all of its outsize, clashing, and striking manifestations.

Profiles from Brills Content

Author: Writers of Brill's Content

Publisher: Contentville Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 223

View: 739

The most memorable profiles of some of the most controversial, discussed, and interesting people making, covering, and disseminating the media from the pages of "Brill's Content." PROFILES FROM BRILL'S CONTENT magazine brings together some of the best, toughest, and most insightful writing about the figures who create media from the magazine committed to studying it. From Abigail Pogrebin's interview with John F. Kennedy, Jr. (one of the last he gave before his death in July of 1999) and Katherine Rosman's portrait of the elusive chronicler of (and sometimes friend to) Hollywood stars, Lynn Hirschberg, to Gay Jervey's much-discussed profiles on "The New York Times's" reporter-about-town Alex Kuczynski and acid-penned columnist Maureen Dowd, these features offer both unforgettable portraits of some of our most intriguing and powerful media figures as well as a discerning history of the machinations behind the most complex, exciting, and treacherous media culture ever.

After

How America Confronted the September 12 Era

Author: Steven Brill

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 723

View: 976