Agricola and Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,J. B. Rives

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014045540X

Category: History

Page: 121

View: 8573

A newly revised edition of two seminal works on Imperial Rome Undeniably one of Rome's most important historians, Tacitus was also one of its most gifted. The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola-the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus's respected father-in-law-and the first known detailed portrayal of the British Isles. In the Germania, Tacitus focuses on the warlike German tribes beyond the Rhine, often comparing the behavior of "barbarian" peoples favorably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.

Agricola and Germania

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141961546

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 4478

The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola - the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus' well-loved and respected father-in-law - and the first detailed account of Britain that has come down to us. It offers fascinating descriptions of the geography, climate and peoples of the country, and a succinct account of the early stages of the Roman occupation, nearly fatally undermined by Boudicca's revolt in AD 61 but consolidated by campaigns that took Agricola as far as Anglesey and northern Scotland. The warlike German tribes are the focus of Tacitus' attention in the Germania, which, like the Agricola, often compares the behaviour of 'barbarian' peoples favourably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.

A Most Dangerous Book

Tacitus's Germania from the Roman Empire to the Third Reich

Author: Christopher B. Krebs

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393062651

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 5656

Traces the five-hundred year history and wide-ranging influence of the Roman historian's unflattering book about the ancient Germans that was eventually extolled by the Nazis as a bible.

Agricola and Germany

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,Anthony Birley

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019953926X

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 6984

Cornelius Tacitus, Rome's greatest historian, was inspired to take up his pen when the assassination of Domitian ended `fifteen years of enforced silence'. Agricola is the biography of his late father-in-law and an account of Roman Britain. Germania gives insight into Rome's most dangerous enemies, the Germans, and is the only surviving specimen from the ancient world of an ethnographic study. Each in its way has had immense influence on our perception of Rome and the northern `barbarians' and the edition reflects recent research in Roman-British and Roman-German history.

The Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Germanic peoples

Page: 139

View: 3664

Tacitus on Britain and Germany

a translation of the Agricola and the Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,Harold Mattingly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 6722

The Annals of Imperial Rome

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141904798

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 8665

Tacitus' Annals of Imperial Rome recount the major historical events from the years shortly before the death of Augustus up to the death of Nero in AD 68. With clarity and vivid intensity he describes the reign of terror under the corrupt Tiberius, the great fire of Rome during the time of Nero, and the wars, poisonings, scandals, conspiracies and murders that were part of imperial life. Despite his claim that the Annals were written objectively, Tacitus' account is sharply critical of the emperors' excesses and fearful for the future of Imperial Rome, while also filled with a longing for its past glories.

The Government of the Roman Empire

A Sourcebook

Author: Dr Barbara Levick,Barbara Levick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134572638

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 853

This book reveals how an empire that stretched from Glasgow to Aswan in Egypt could be ruled from a single city and still survive more than a thousand years. The Government of the Roman Empire is the only sourcebook to concentrate on the administration of the empire, using the evidence of contemporary writers and historians. Specifically designed for students, with extensive cross-referencing, bibliographies and introductions and explanations for each item, this new edition brings the book right up-to-date, and makes it the ideal resource for students of the subject.

A History of Roman Britain

Author: Peter Salway

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780192801388

Category: History

Page: 594

View: 2056

'There will be new discoveries; but this is a book that will surely stand the test of time.' -TLS

The Conquest of Gaul

Author: Julius Caesar,W. A. MacDevitt

Publisher: Digireads.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781420945140

Category: History

Page: 140

View: 9324

First published just before the end of the Roman Republic by that legendary country's most immortalized leader, "The Conquest of Gaul," also called "Commentarii de Bello Gallico," is an account of Julius Caesar's capture of Gaul in the first century. Beginning with the Helvetian War in 58 BC, Caesar uses his exemplary Latin prose to explain how his forces were protecting Provence, and how they were later drawn out in campaigns against the Veneti, the Aquitani, numerous Germanic peoples, the Belgae, the Gauls, and the Bretons. Caesar, perhaps in defense of his expensive and geographically vast wars, explains the methods of his campaigns, from the timing of the seasons to provisioning and defense. This autobiographical work is both a concise reckoning of forces and an informative wartime narrative, consistently revealing the author as a politically brilliant commander and an unrivaled man.

Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780140442410

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 6435

The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola – the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus' well-loved and respected father-in-law – and the first detailed account of Britain that has come down to us. It offers fascinating descriptions of the geography, climate and peoples of the country, and a succinct account of the early stages of the Roman occupation, nearly fatally undermined by Boudicca's revolt in AD 61 but consolidated by campaigns that took Agricola as far as Anglesey and northern Scotland. The warlike German tribes are the focus of Tacitus' attention in the Germania, which, like the Agricola, often compares the behaviour of 'barbarian' peoples favourably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.

Rome

An Empire's Story

Author: Greg Woolf

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199777500

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 306

The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome and even today traces of its monuments, literature, and institutions can be found across Europe, the Near East, and North Africa--and sometimes even further afield. In Rome, historian Greg Woolf expertly recounts how this mammoth empire was created, how it was sustained in crisis, and how it shaped the world of its rulers and subjects--a story spanning a millennium and a half of history. The personalities and events of Roman history have become part of the West's cultural lexicon, and Woolf provides brilliant retellings of each of these, from the war with Carthage to Octavian's victory over Cleopatra, from the height of territorial expansion under the emperors Trajan and Hadrian to the founding of Constantinople and the barbarian invasions which resulted in Rome's ultimate collapse. Throughout, Woolf carefully considers the conditions that made Rome's success possible and so durable, covering topics as diverse as ecology, slavery, and religion. Woolf also compares Rome to other ancient empires and to its many later imitators, bringing into vivid relief the Empire's most distinctive and enduring features. As Woolf demonstrates, nobody ever planned to create a state that would last more than a millennium and a half, yet Rome was able, in the end, to survive barbarian migrations, economic collapse and even the conflicts between a series of world religions that had grown up within its borders, in the process generating an image and a myth of empire that is apparently indestructible. Based on new research and compellingly told, this sweeping account promises to eclipse all previously published histories of the empire.

Smashed

Story of a Drunken Girlhood

Author: Koren Zailckas

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780143036470

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 342

View: 5747

A twenty-four-year-old survivor of alcoholism recounts her journey from teen experimentation to binge drinking, a process during which she endured depression, rage, sexual exploitation, and troubled relationships before making the decision to heal, in a personal memoir that also offers insight into youth alcohol abuse. Reprint.

The Complete Works of Tacitus

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: Digireads.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781420947144

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6015

Ancient Roman senator and historian Publius Cornelius Tacitus is known throughout Western history as one of the greatest historical writers of the Silver Age of Latin literature. He lived during the first century AD and was the son of a wealthy aristocratic family. Not much is known about his personal life; however, it is clear that both Tacitus and Pliny the Elder were acquaintances and even possibly childhood friends, though there is no substantial evidence to support this. Tacitus studied rhetoric in order to create a career in law and politics. He steadily rose throughout the ranks due to his strong speaking style and oration skills. However, his language skills did not stop with verbal speeches. He was also an accomplished writer who focused on the history of the Roman Empire. He created five works, "The Annals," "The Histories," "The Agricola," "The Germania," and "A Dialogue on Oratory." His works delve deep into the facts as he knew them, rarely ever embellishing history to create a story. He also stayed true to chronological order and laid history out in visible steps. It is also notable that Tacitus knew that his fellow politicians were corrupt; he believed that they gave up their strong voice in order to please a usually corrupt emperor. These five great works are brought together in this collection of "The Complete Works of Tacitus."

The Harmless People

Author: Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307772950

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 4114

A study of primitive people which, for beauty of...style and concept, would be hard to match." -- The New York Times Book Review In the 1950s Elizabeth Marshall Thomas became one of the first Westerners to live with the Bushmen of the Kalahari desert in Botswana and South-West Africa. Her account of these nomadic hunter-gatherers, whose way of life had remained unchanged for thousands of years, is a ground-breaking work of anthropology, remarkable not only for its scholarship but for its novelistic grasp of character. On the basis of field trips in the 1980s, Thomas has now updated her book to show what happened to the Bushmen as the tide of industrial civilization -- with its flotsam of property rights, wage labor, and alcohol -- swept over them. The result is a powerful, elegiac look at an endangered culture as well as a provocative critique of our own. "The charm of this book is that the author can so truly convey the strangeness of the desert life in which we perceive human traits as familiar as our own....The Harmless People is a model of exposition: the style very simple and precise, perfectly suited to the neat, even fastidious activities of a people who must make their world out of next to nothing." -- The Atlantic From the Trade Paperback edition.

Akenfield

Portrait of an English Village

Author: Ronald Blythe

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590178319

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7770

Woven from the words of the inhabitants of a small Suffolk village in the 1960s, Akenfield is a masterpiece of twentieth-century English literature, a scrupulously observed and deeply affecting portrait of a place and people and a now vanished way of life. Ronald Blythe’s wonderful book raises enduring questions about the relations between memory and modernity, nature and human nature, silence and speech.

Blank Spots on the Map

The Dark Geography of the Pentagon's Secret World

Author: Trevor Paglen

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101011491

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4852

Welcome to a top-level clearance world that doesn't exist...Now with updated material for the paperback edition. This is the adventurous, insightful, and often chilling story of a road trip through a shadow nation of state secrets, clandestine military bases, black sites, hidden laboratories, and top-secret agencies that make up what insiders call the "black world." Here, geographer and provocateur Trevor Paglen knocks on the doors of CIA prisons, stakes out a covert air base in Nevada from a mountaintop 30 miles away, dissects the Defense Department's multibillion dollar "black" budget, and interviews those who live on the edges of these blank spots. Whether Paglen reports from a hotel room in Vegas, a secret prison in Kabul, or a trailer in Shoshone Indian territory, he is impassioned, rigorous, relentless-and delivers eye-opening details.

Leisure and Ancient Rome

Author: J. P. Toner

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745668909

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 1852

In this book Toner offers a new way of looking at Roman society at all levels, not just among the elite, by examining the imperial games and the baths as well as gambling, the taverns, theatre and carnivals.

Tacitus

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3311