Agricola and Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,J. B. Rives

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014045540X

Category: History

Page: 121

View: 1945

A newly revised edition of two seminal works on Imperial Rome Undeniably one of Rome's most important historians, Tacitus was also one of its most gifted. The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola-the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus's respected father-in-law-and the first known detailed portrayal of the British Isles. In the Germania, Tacitus focuses on the warlike German tribes beyond the Rhine, often comparing the behavior of "barbarian" peoples favorably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.

Agricola and Germania

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141961546

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 9921

The Agricola is both a portrait of Julius Agricola - the most famous governor of Roman Britain and Tacitus' well-loved and respected father-in-law - and the first detailed account of Britain that has come down to us. It offers fascinating descriptions of the geography, climate and peoples of the country, and a succinct account of the early stages of the Roman occupation, nearly fatally undermined by Boudicca's revolt in AD 61 but consolidated by campaigns that took Agricola as far as Anglesey and northern Scotland. The warlike German tribes are the focus of Tacitus' attention in the Germania, which, like the Agricola, often compares the behaviour of 'barbarian' peoples favourably with the decadence and corruption of Imperial Rome.

Agricola, Germany, and Dialogue on Orators

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,Herbert W. Benario

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872208117

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 3756

A reprint of the University of Oklahoma Press edition of 1991 Eminent scholar and translator, Herbert W. Benario, provides a faithful, readable translation of these works, introductory essays, chapter summaries, and notes. A bibliography, maps, and an index are included.

A Most Dangerous Book

Tacitus's Germania from the Roman Empire to the Third Reich

Author: Christopher B. Krebs

Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated

ISBN: 9780393342925

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7616

Traces the five-hundred year history and wide-ranging influence of the Roman historian's unflattering book about the ancient Germans that was eventually extolled by the Nazis as a bible.

Germania

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,J. B. Rives

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199240000

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 7567

The Germania of Tacitus is the most extensive account of the ancient Germans written during the Roman period, but has been relatively neglected in the scholarship of the English-speaking world: the last commentary appeared in 1938, and only a handful of studies have appeared since that time. In recent decades, however, there have been important scholarly developments that significantly affect our understanding of it. Ongoing archaeological work in western and central Europe has greatly increased our knowledge of the iron-age cultures in those regions, while new anthropological and literary approaches have called into question some of the traditional assumptions that shaped the use of this text as a historical source. This new commentary, together with the extensive introduction, provides a current and comprehensive guide to the relevant textual and archaeological evidence and also examines the methodological issues involved in the interpretation of this important work.

From Memory to Written Record

England 1066 - 1307

Author: Michael T. Clanchy

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118295986

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 2289

This seminal work of scholarship, which traces the development of literacy in medieval England, is now fully updated in a third edition. This book serves as an introduction to medieval books and documents for graduate students throughout the world Features a completely re-written first chapter, ‘Memories and Myths of the Norman Conquest', and a new postscript by the author reflecting on the reception to the original publication and discussing recent scholarship on medieval literacy Includes a revised guide to further reading and a revision of the plates which illustrate medieval manuscripts in detail

Rome

An Empire's Story

Author: Greg Woolf

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199972176

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3094

The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome and even today traces of its monuments, literature, and institutions can be found across Europe, the Near East, and North Africa--and sometimes even further afield. In Rome, historian Greg Woolf expertly recounts how this mammoth empire was created, how it was sustained in crisis, and how it shaped the world of its rulers and subjects--a story spanning a millennium and a half of history. The personalities and events of Roman history have become part of the West's cultural lexicon, and Woolf provides brilliant retellings of each of these, from the war with Carthage to Octavian's victory over Cleopatra, from the height of territorial expansion under the emperors Trajan and Hadrian to the founding of Constantinople and the barbarian invasions which resulted in Rome's ultimate collapse. Throughout, Woolf carefully considers the conditions that made Rome's success possible and so durable, covering topics as diverse as ecology, slavery, and religion. Woolf also compares Rome to other ancient empires and to its many later imitators, bringing into vivid relief the Empire's most distinctive and enduring features. As Woolf demonstrates, nobody ever planned to create a state that would last more than a millennium and a half, yet Rome was able, in the end, to survive barbarian migrations, economic collapse and even the conflicts between a series of world religions that had grown up within its borders, in the process generating an image and a myth of empire that is apparently indestructible. Based on new research and compellingly told, this sweeping account promises to eclipse all previously published histories of the empire.

Fronto: Selected Letters

Author: Marcus Cornelius Fronto,Caillan Davenport,Jennifer Manley

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1780934424

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 6598

Selected letters written by the Roman senator and orator M. Cornelius Fronto in translation and accompanied by in-depth commentary notes, offering a unique insight into the late second century A.D Roman world.

The Complete Works of Tacitus

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: Digireads.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781420947144

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 8700

Ancient Roman senator and historian Publius Cornelius Tacitus is known throughout Western history as one of the greatest historical writers of the Silver Age of Latin literature. He lived during the first century AD and was the son of a wealthy aristocratic family. Not much is known about his personal life; however, it is clear that both Tacitus and Pliny the Elder were acquaintances and even possibly childhood friends, though there is no substantial evidence to support this. Tacitus studied rhetoric in order to create a career in law and politics. He steadily rose throughout the ranks due to his strong speaking style and oration skills. However, his language skills did not stop with verbal speeches. He was also an accomplished writer who focused on the history of the Roman Empire. He created five works, "The Annals," "The Histories," "The Agricola," "The Germania," and "A Dialogue on Oratory." His works delve deep into the facts as he knew them, rarely ever embellishing history to create a story. He also stayed true to chronological order and laid history out in visible steps. It is also notable that Tacitus knew that his fellow politicians were corrupt; he believed that they gave up their strong voice in order to please a usually corrupt emperor. These five great works are brought together in this collection of "The Complete Works of Tacitus."

The Conquest of Gaul

Author: Julius Caesar,W. A. MacDevitt

Publisher: Digireads.com Publishing

ISBN: 9781420945140

Category: History

Page: 140

View: 6886

First published just before the end of the Roman Republic by that legendary country's most immortalized leader, "The Conquest of Gaul," also called "Commentarii de Bello Gallico," is an account of Julius Caesar's capture of Gaul in the first century. Beginning with the Helvetian War in 58 BC, Caesar uses his exemplary Latin prose to explain how his forces were protecting Provence, and how they were later drawn out in campaigns against the Veneti, the Aquitani, numerous Germanic peoples, the Belgae, the Gauls, and the Bretons. Caesar, perhaps in defense of his expensive and geographically vast wars, explains the methods of his campaigns, from the timing of the seasons to provisioning and defense. This autobiographical work is both a concise reckoning of forces and an informative wartime narrative, consistently revealing the author as a politically brilliant commander and an unrivaled man.

Hadrian

Empire and Conflict

Author: Thorsten Opper

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674030954

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 7784

Even in the panoply of Roman history, Hadrian stands out. Emperor from 117 to 138 ad, he was at once a benevolent ruler and a ruthless military leader, known for his restless and ambitious nature, his interest in architecture, and his passion for Greek culture. This book moves beyond the familiar image of Hadrian to offer a new appraisal of this Emperorâe(tm)s contradictory personality, his exploits and accomplishments, his rule, and his military role, against the backdrop of his twenty-one-year reign. Lavishly illustrated with key works of art and objects, celebrated and little-known sculptures, bronzes, coins and medals, drawings, and watercolors from museums around the globe, the book conveys a vivid sense of the world Hadrian inhabited. Thorsten Opper shows the emperor from many anglesâe"as a complex individual, as a military leader and strategist, as the amateur architect who created magnificent buildings such as his villa at Tivoli (an empire in miniature), as the lover who deified his male lover Antinous after his mysterious death in the Nile, and, finally, as the traveler who tirelessly roamed his empire and its boundaries. From his place in Roman history to his legacy, which even makes its way into the popular culture of our day, the Hadrian who emerges from these pages is no longer larger than life; rather, he has all the depth and complexity, the color and shadings and detail of life itself.

The Annals of Tacitus:

Author: Cornelius Tacitus,Tacitus,Francis Richard David Goodyear

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521609463

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 1386

Covers the period AD 20-22 and contains some of Tacitus' best known and important programmatic and reflective passages.

The Annals of Imperial Rome

Author: Tacitus

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141904798

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 645

Tacitus' Annals of Imperial Rome recount the major historical events from the years shortly before the death of Augustus up to the death of Nero in AD 68. With clarity and vivid intensity he describes the reign of terror under the corrupt Tiberius, the great fire of Rome during the time of Nero, and the wars, poisonings, scandals, conspiracies and murders that were part of imperial life. Despite his claim that the Annals were written objectively, Tacitus' account is sharply critical of the emperors' excesses and fearful for the future of Imperial Rome, while also filled with a longing for its past glories.

Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe

Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions

Author: Hilda Roderick Ellis Davidson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719025792

Category: Celts

Page: 268

View: 3826

Der Agricola Des Tacitus

Author: Cornelius Tacitus

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN: 9781356577767

Category:

Page: 106

View: 3656

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Roman Empire

Power and People

Author: Dirk Booms,Belinda Crerar,Susan Raikes

Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited

ISBN: 9780714122854

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 9881

Arguably the most formidable of powers the world has ever seen, the Roman Empire in its prime stretched from Spain to Iraq and from Germany to Egypt, encompassing all the territory in between. By AD 117, it had engulfed almost fifty countries we know today , marrying a fascinating range of cultures and traditions . This beautifully illustrated book explores the diverse peoples of the Roman Empire: how they viewed themselves and others as Romans and examin ing t heir enduring legacy today, from the languages we speak, to the legal systems we live by, the towns and cities we live in, and even to our table manners. Featuring some of the finest pieces from the Roman period in the British Museum collection , including sculpture from the villas of the Emperors Tiberius and Hadrian, coins from the famous Hoxne treasure, beautiful jewellery and even near - perfectly preserved childrens clothing, Roman Empire: Power and People demonst rates that although the wealth and might of the Empire rendered it irresistible and often unstoppable, provincial traditions and heritage flourished in the face of overwhelming change.

Smashed

Growing Up A Drunk Girl

Author: Koren Zailckas

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1446490890

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 8057

The day Koren turned fourteen she tasted alcohol for the first time. At fifteen she was piecing together forgotten fragments of drink, men and misplaced clothes. At sixteen she was being carried through hospital doors unconscious. And so it began... Brought up by loving parents in a stable middle-class home, Koren was a sweet and altogether normal child. Yet from her mid-teens until her early twenties, she thought nothing of regularly drinking herself into a state of amnesia. Alcohol became her safeguard and prop, providing her with a self-confidence she couldn't otherwise feel. And whilst drinking to excess was perfectly acceptable, even actively encouraged, amongst her friends, it quickly reached a destructive monotony that bordered on dependency. It took a number of terrifying incidents - from stumbling home alone covered in vomit to waking up naked in bed unsure of whether she had lost her virginity - before Koren could finally say to herself enough was enough and seek help for her problem. Smashed is the shocking but all-too-recognisable story of a young woman coming of age within a society that finds it easier to turn a blind eye to binge-drinking than address the problem head on. Beautifully written and brutally honest, compelling without preaching, this is a book that demands to be read.

Akenfield

Portrait of an English Village

Author: Ronald Blythe

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 1590178319

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 4705

Woven from the words of the inhabitants of a small Suffolk village in the 1960s, Akenfield is a masterpiece of twentieth-century English literature, a scrupulously observed and deeply affecting portrait of a place and people and a now vanished way of life. Ronald Blythe’s wonderful book raises enduring questions about the relations between memory and modernity, nature and human nature, silence and speech.

The Light in the Forest

Author: Conrad Richter

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804151016

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 192

View: 8418

An adventurous story of a frontier boy raised by Indians, The Light in the Forest is a beloved American classic. When John Cameron Butler was a child, he was captured in a raid on the Pennsylvania frontier and adopted by the great warrrior Cuyloga. Renamed True Son, he came to think of himself as fully Indian. But eleven years later his tribe, the Lenni Lenape, has signed a treaty with the white men and agreed to return their captives, including fifteen-year-old True Son. Now he must go back to the family he has forgotten, whose language is no longer his, and whose ways of dress and behavior are as strange to him as the ways of the forest are to them. From the Paperback edition.