Advice for a Young Investigator

Author: Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262681506

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 150

View: 6494

This recently rediscovered classic, first published in 1897, is an anecdotal guide for the perplexed new scientific investigator as well as a refreshing resource for the old pro.

What Newcomers to Biological Research Should Know

A BIT of Advice for a Young Investigator

Author: Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262317974

Category: Science

Page: 21

View: 8288

Santiago Ramón y Cajal is a towering figure in the history of science. Hailed today as the father of modern anatomy and neurobiology, he was largely responsible for the modern conception of the brain. Advice for a Young Investigator, first published in 1897, offers a witty and anecdotal guide for scientists that can be enjoyed by both novice and veteran researchers. In this BIT, Ramón y Cajal considers what it takes to be a successful scientific investigator.

Recollections of My Life

Author: Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262680608

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 638

View: 6853

Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) made prolific and lasting contributions to understanding "the life of the infinitely small." Widely thought of as the founder of neuroscience, Cajal made remarkable explorations into the organization and function of the nervous system. His work is still referred to more than that of any other scientist in the field.W. Maxwell Cowan's foreword to this edition conveys the excitement and energy of Cajal's life and endeavors, the liveliness and flamboyance of his engagements with the microscope. Cowan surveys Cajal's salient discoveries, noting that almost every important conceptual issue in neurobiology was foreshadowed in Cajal's work: the initial description of the climbing fibers of the cerebellum, the discovery of the growth cone, the concept of the "dynamic polarity" of the neurom an anticipation of the later discovery of axonal transport, and the prediction that new synapses may be formed throughout life to serve as a physical basis for learning and memory.W. Maxwell Cowen is Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

The Beautiful Brain

The Drawings of Santiago Ramon y Cajal

Author: Larry W. Swanson,Eric Newman,Alfonso Araque,Janet M. Dubinsky

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN: 1613129947

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 1692

At the crossroads of art and science, Beautiful Brain presents Nobel Laureate Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s contributions to neuroscience through his groundbreaking artistic brain imagery. Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852–1934) was the father of modern neuroscience and an exceptional artist. He devoted his life to the anatomy of the brain, the body’s most complex and mysterious organ. His superhuman feats of visualization, based on fanatically precise techniques and countless hours at the microscope, resulted in some of the most remarkable illustrations in the history of science. Beautiful Brain presents a selection of his exquisite drawings of brain cells, brain regions, and neural circuits with accessible descriptive commentary. These drawings are explored from multiple perspectives: Larry W. Swanson describes Cajal’s contributions to neuroscience; Lyndel King and Eric Himmel explore his artistic roots and achievement; Eric A. Newman provides commentary on the drawings; and Janet M. Dubinsky describes contemporary neuroscience imaging techniques. This book is the companion to a traveling exhibition opening at the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis in February 2017, marking the first time that many of these works, which are housed at the Instituto Cajal in Madrid, have been seen outside of Spain. Beautiful Brain showcases Cajal’s contributions to neuroscience, explores his artistic roots and achievement, and looks at his work in relation to contemporary neuroscience imaging, appealing to general readers and professionals alike.

Cybernetic Revolutionaries

Technology and Politics in Allende's Chile

Author: Eden Medina

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262525968

Category: Computers

Page: 344

View: 2501

A historical study of Chile's twin experiments with cybernetics and socialism, and what they tell us about the relationship of technology and politics.

Letters to a Young Scientist

Author: Edward O. Wilson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0871407000

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 6422

Pulitzer Prize–winning biologist Edward O. Wilson imparts the wisdom of his storied career to the next generation. Edward O. Wilson has distilled sixty years of teaching into a book for students, young and old. Reflecting on his coming-of-age in the South as a Boy Scout and a lover of ants and butterflies, Wilson threads these twenty-one letters, each richly illustrated, with autobiographical anecdotes that illuminate his career—both his successes and his failures—and his motivations for becoming a biologist. At a time in human history when our survival is more than ever linked to our understanding of science, Wilson insists that success in the sciences does not depend on mathematical skill, but rather a passion for finding a problem and solving it. From the collapse of stars to the exploration of rain forests and the oceans’ depths, Wilson instills a love of the innate creativity of science and a respect for the human being’s modest place in the planet’s ecosystem in his readers.

Methods in Mind

Author: Carl Senior,Tamara Russell,Michael S. Gazzaniga

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262195410

Category: Medical

Page: 382

View: 5169

The evolution of cognitive neuroscience has been spurred by the development of increasingly sophisticated investigative techniques to study human cognition. In Methods in Mind, experts examine the wide variety of tools available to cognitive neuroscientists, paying particular attention to the ways in which different methods can be integrated to strengthen empirical findings and how innovative uses for established techniques can be developed. The book will be a uniquely valuable resource for the researcher seeking to expand his or her repertoire of investigative techniques.Each chapter explores a different approach. These include transcranial magnetic stimulation, cognitive neuropsychiatry, lesion studies in nonhuman primates, computational modeling, psychophysiology, single neurons and primate behavior, grid computing, eye movements, fMRI, electroencephalography, imaging genetics, magnetoencephalography, neuropharmacology, and neuroendocrinology. As mandated, authors focus on convergence and innovation in their fields; chapters highlight such cross-method innovations as the use of the fMRI signal to constrain magnetoencephalography, the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to guide rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation at a specific frequency, and the successful integration of neuroimaging and genetic analysis. Computational approaches depend on increased computing power, and one chapter describes the use of distributed or grid computing to analyze massive datasets in cyberspace. Each chapter author is a leading authority in the technique discussed.Contributors: Peyman Adjamian, Peter A. Bandettini, Mark Baxter, Anthony S. David, James Dobson, Ian Foster, Michael Gazzaniga, Dietmar G. Heinke, Stephen Hall, John M. Henderson, Glyn W. Humphreys, Andreas Meyer-Lindenburg, Venkata Mattay, Elisabeth A. Murray, Gina Rippon, Tamara Russell, Carl Senior, Philip Shaw, Krish D. Singh, Marc A. Sommer, Lauren Stewart, John D. Van Horn, Jens Voeckler, Vincent Walsh, Daniel R. Weinberger, Michael Wilde, Jeffrey Woodward, Robert H. Wurtz, Eun Young Yoon, Yong Zhao Carl Senior, Tamara Russell and Michael S. Gazzaniga

New Ideas on the Structure of the Nervous System in Man and Vertebrates

Author: Larry W. Swanson,Y Cajal Santiago Ramon,Neely Swanson

Publisher: Mit Press

ISBN: 9780262519366

Category: Medical

Page: 211

View: 4892

Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) is widely thought of as the founder of modern neuroscience; and his work is more frequently cited than that of any other scientist in the field. In this seminal book, Cajal summarized for a broad audience the modem cellular view of brain organization. This clear, direct, and accurate translation provides an excellent introduction to Cajal's work, making accessible for the first time the ideas that led Cajal to favor the neuron doctrine that revolutionized neuroscience and won for him (with his rival, Camillo Golgi) the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1906.New Ideas on the Structure of the Nervous System in Man and Vertebrates presents the histological evidence for the laws governing the form and connections of nerve cells. This work and the principles that emerged from it formed the cornerstone for our current understanding of how the nervous system is organized. The book also presents in simplified form the ideas contained in Cajal's famous survey of vertebrate neurohistology, Histologie du Systeme Nerveux de l'Homme et des Vertébrés, unquestionably the most important book ever published in neuroanatomy, and which to this day has not been translated and published in English because of its extraordinary length.Neely Swanson is a scholar of romance languages. Larry W. Swanson is Senior Member of the Salk Institute, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego, and Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Cajal on the Cerebral Cortex

An Annotated Translation of the Complete Writings

Author: Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 654

View: 1839

The first English-language publication of the complete works of the great Spanish neurohistologist, Santiago Ramon y Cajal, on the cerebral cortex. "It is amazing to read Cajal so many years after the original publication and find that despite all the technical advances he is still fresh, readable, accurate, and valuable. To have the English translation done by two neuroscientists, one of whom is a native speaker of Spanish, is the best of possible worlds. Wehave had to wait a long time for this book, and many will feel that they must have it." --Dr. Pasko Rakic, Yale University School of Medicine

Midlife

A Philosophical Guide

Author: Kieran Setiya

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400888476

Category: Philosophy

Page: 200

View: 2869

Philosophical wisdom and practical advice for overcoming the problems of middle age How can you reconcile yourself with the lives you will never lead, with possibilities foreclosed, and with nostalgia for lost youth? How can you accept the failings of the past, the sense of futility in the tasks that consume the present, and the prospect of death that blights the future? In this self-help book with a difference, Kieran Setiya confronts the inevitable challenges of adulthood and middle age, showing how philosophy can help you thrive. You will learn why missing out might be a good thing, how options are overrated, and when you should be glad you made a mistake. You will be introduced to philosophical consolations for mortality. And you will learn what it would mean to live in the present, how it could solve your midlife crisis, and why meditation helps. Ranging from Aristotle, Schopenhauer, and John Stuart Mill to Virginia Woolf and Simone de Beauvoir, as well as drawing on Setiya’s own experience, Midlife combines imaginative ideas, surprising insights, and practical advice. Writing with wisdom and wit, Setiya makes a wry but passionate case for philosophy as a guide to life.

Advice to the Young Physician

On the Art of Medicine

Author: Richard Colgan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781441910349

Category: Medical

Page: 139

View: 2378

Advice to the Young Physician introduces the origins of important teachings that form the basis of medicine as it has been taught by some of history's greatest educators in medicine. Advice to the Young Physician reveals how to make the transition from technician to healer. This book reinforces the humanistic side of patient care, which is often overshadowed by the focus on highly technological elements. Medical students, residents, fellows, physicians, and allied health practitioners often forget the intricacies of the genomic makeup of adenoviruses, yet they remember the tips, anecdotes and aphorisms related by mentors, educators, and experienced physicians. The art of medicine comes from insights gained from unique and dynamic experiences between the physician, an enthusiastic medical student and the human patient, and is rarely found in books or taught in a universal and systematic way. Advice to the Young Physician provides numerous examples of best practices in order to internalize and practice the art of medicine, including tenets taught by Hippocrates, Maimonides, Osler, Peabody, Schweitzer and others. Advice to the Young Physician targets aspiring and new physicians with the intent to make them better physicians. It hits the mark. An effective mix of the writings of some of medicine's giants, as well as clinical experiences of the author, the book offers an historical framework and personal context to understand the attributes and attitudes of the good physician. It is a quick read that rewards the reader with a sampling of 4000 years of medical wisdom sprinkled with practical advice for the modern day doctor. --Richard G. Roberts, MD, JD, Professor of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, President World Organization of Family Doctors, Past President American Academy of Family Physicians This is a small book and easy to read. It comprises several inspiring sketches of ancient and modern physicians whose reputations were based as much on their dedication to the humanism of medicine as it was to the science of medicine. Those who teach medical students and residents will find it a good source of medical history that, besides being important in itself, will add a new dimension and a little lightness to morning rounds. The author makes it clear that in our era of high technology it is easy to underestimate the importance of uniting humanism with science in caring for the sick. He also provides some practical information on such topics as how to present a case to attending physicians and how to communicate well with patients. The ancient physicians that history remembers were not only astute observers of signs and symptoms but also were deeply concerned about the psychological health of their patients and how disturbances in their emotional health often manifested in physical symptoms. Colgan starts with Hippocrates and Maimonides whose names many young physicians are familiar with. The former for the aphorism “first do no harm” and the latter for being one of the first to call medicine a “vocation” and a “calling.” The following “greats” are included in the book: Dr Albert Schweitzer whose “reverence for life” led him to his missionary medical work in Africa. He wrote Out of My Life and Thought and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1952. Sir William Osler (1849–1919), known to some as the father of internal medicine, was a respected physician and teacher. He was the author of the Principles and Practice of Medicine, used for decades as the bible of medicine. But his fame rested equally on his dedication as a mentor to young physicians. He often gave graduation addresses to medical students reminding them to maintain a life-long interest in continuous learning and to treat the whole patient not just the disease. Francis Weld Peabody (1881–1927) a teacher at Harvard who had written a book The Care of the Patient in which he discussed how older practitioners often complained that younger doctors’ mindsets were so often over-concerned with testing that they sometimes forgot about how to take care of the whole patient. Dr. Theodore E. Woodward (1914–2005) who was famous for his dedication to patients. Once during a snowstorm he hitched a ride on a snowplow to see his patients at the hospital. He is responsible for the epigram “when you hear hoof beats think of horses not zebras.” Dr Edmund Pellegrino, respected for his studies in bioethics. His interest in protecting the sanctity of the doctor-patient relationship has particular importance in our current era when it seems that the art of medicine seems to be overshadowed by the business of medicine. He discusses this in his essay “The Commodification of Medical and Health Care.” Dr. Paul Farmer also is deeply concerned with the ethical ramifications of the commercialization that is overtaking the health system. He is devoted to improving public health on a worldwide scale. The author finishes up with some practical tips such as how to take a good history and how to avoid malpractice suits. He mentions the importance of finding a reasonable balance between our personal and professional lives. To offset the pressures that are sure to arise in caring for patients he reminds us as, Osler said, to look for the “poetry in life,” meaning to really try and understand the human side of the patients we treat. Throughout the book Colgan refers to doctors as “healers.” He suggests that healers are those who rise above the merely technical aspects of their craft and connect with patients in a special way—a way that respects their uniqueness and their human nature. It’s hard to describe in scientific terms what a healer is. As the author points out, most doctors know them when they see them. Edward J. Volpintesta, MD Bethe

Advice to the Healer

On the Art of Caring

Author: Richard Colgan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461451701

Category: Medical

Page: 181

View: 3597

This book introduces the origins of important teachings that form the basis of medicine and related healing professions. Reinforcing the humanistic side of patient care, this book replicates the tips, anecdotes and aphorisms often related by mentors and educators to medical students, residents, and young physicians. This book provides numerous examples of best practices in the art of medicine, profiles of great healers throughout history and around the world, and stories sure to inspire any practicing healer, whether they are new to the calling or a seasoned veteran.

The Dreams of Santiago Ramón Y Cajal

Author: Benjamin Ehrlich

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190619619

Category:

Page: 168

View: 8729

The Spanish anatomist Santiago Ramon y Cajal (1852-1934) explored the microscopic world of the brain and found a landscape inhabited by distinctly individual cells, later termed neurons. "The mysterious butterflies of the soul," he called them, "whose beating of wings may one day reveal to us the secrets of the mind." Although he ranks among the greatest scientists in history, the name of the Nobel Prize-winning "father of modern neuroscience" is not as well-known as that of Darwin, Pasteur, Galileo, Einstein, Copernicus, and Isaac Newton. The second half of the nineteenth century saw a revolution in the study of the mind. Cajal was a contemporary of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), whose radical theories would scandalize the next century. Before he was a neuroanatomist Cajal conducted psychiatric experiments and before Freud became a psychiatrist, he worked in neuroanatomy. In public, Cajal spoke respectfully about Freud, but in private, Cajal rejected the man and his theories. In order to disprove Freud's "lies," Cajal started to record his own dreams in a diary, part of a notably personal book project, which he worked on from 1918 until his death in 1934. For reasons unknown, Cajal never published this work. Until recently, it was assumed that the manuscript had been destroyed during the Spanish Civil War. The Dreams of Santiago Ramon y Cajal is this lost dream diary, translated into English for the first time. The text is accompanied by an introduction to the life and work of Cajal, his relationship with the famed Viennese psychoanalyst, and the historical context surrounding the contributions of two great dueling intellects. "

Prize Fight

The Race and the Rivalry to be the First in Science

Author: Morton Meyers, M.D.

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137000562

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 1034

We often think of scientists as dispassionate and detached, nobly laboring without any expectation of reward. But scientific research is much more complicated and messy than this ideal, and scientists can be torn by jealousy, impelled by a need for recognition, and subject to human vulnerability and fallibility. In Prize Fight , Emeritus Chair at SUNY School of Medicine Morton Meyers pulls back the curtain to reveal the dark side of scientific discovery. From allegations of stolen authorship to fabricated results and elaborate hoaxes, he shows us how too often brilliant minds are reduced to petty jealousies and promising careers cut short by disputes over authorship or fudged data. Prize Fight is a dramatic look at some of the most notable discoveries in science in recent years, from the discovery of insulin, which led to decades of infighting and even violence, to why the 2003 Nobel Prize in Medicine exposed how often scientific objectivity is imperiled.

The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize

A Life in Science

Author: Peter C. Doherty

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231138962

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 294

View: 7453

Peter Doherty recounts his unlikely path to becoming a Nobel Laureate, revealing how his nonconformist upbringing, sense of being an outsider, and search for a different perspective have shaped his life and work. Beginning with his humble origins in Australia, Doherty shares his early interests and describes his award-winning, influential work with Rolf Zinkernagel on T-cells and the nature of immune defense. In prose that is amusing and astute, Doherty offers a rare insider's look at the realities of being a research scientist. He lucidly explains his own scientific work and the selection, funding, and organization of research projects; the major problems science hopes to solve; and the rewards of a career in scientific research. For Doherty, science plays an important role in improving the world, and he argues that scientists need to do a better job of making their work more accessible to the public. He concludes with tips on how to win a Nobel Prize, including advice on being persistent, generous, and culturally aware.

A World of Work

Imagined Manuals for Real Jobs

Author: Ilana Gershon

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 080145641X

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 5765

Ever wondered what it would be like to be a street magician in Paris? A fish farmer in Norway? A costume designer in Bollywood? This playful and accessible look at different types of work around the world delivers a wealth of information and advice about a wide array of jobs and professions. The value of this book is twofold: For young people or middle-aged people who are undecided about their career paths and feel constrained in their choices, A World of Work offers an expansive vision. For ethnographers, this book offers an excellent example of using the practical details of everyday life to shed light on larger structural issues. Each chapter in this collection of ethnographic fiction could be considered a job manual. Yet not any typical job manual—to do justice to the ways details about jobs are conveyed in culturally specific ways, the authors adopt a range of voices and perspectives. One chapter is written as though it was a letter from an older sister counseling her brother on how to be a doctor in Malawi. Another is framed as a eulogy for a well-loved village magistrate in Papua New Guinea who may have been killed by sorcery. Beneath the novelty of the examples are some serious messages that Ilana Gershon highlights in her introduction. These ethnographies reveal the connection between work and culture, the impact of societal values on the conditions of employment. Readers will be surprised at how much they can learn about an entire culture by being given the chance to understand just one occupation. Contributors: Lovleen Bains, Mumbai; Chiwoza Bandawe, University of Malawi; Joshua A. Bell, Smithsonian Institution; Michelle Bigenho, Colgate University; Warren Chamberlain, Vita Needle Company, Massachusetts; Melissa Demian, Australian National University; Ilana Gershon, Indiana University; Kathryn Graber, Indiana University; Graham M. Jones, MIT; Amanda Kemble, The George Washington University; Briel Kobak, The George Washington University; Corinna Kruse, Linköping University, Sweden; Joel Kuipers, The George Washington University; Carrie Lane, California State University, Fullerton; Jean Lave, University of California, Berkeley; John Law, Open University; Heather Levi, Temple University; Marianne Elisabeth Lien, University of Oslo; Caitrin Lynch, Olin College; Loïc Marquet, Paris; Winnifred Fallers Sullivan, Indiana University; Chris Swift, Leeds Teaching Hospitals; Claire Wendland, University of Wisconsin–Madison; Clare Wilkinson, University of Pennsylvania; Helena Wulff, Stockholm University

Life in the Year 6000

A Fantasy Dream

Author: Santiago Ramon y Cajal,Lazaros C. Triarhou

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781530999699

Category:

Page: 54

View: 1241

From the pen of the versatile Spanish Nobel Laureate, Santiago Ram�n y Cajal (1852-1934), the visionary of science, also known as the "Don Quixote of the Microscope," comes this unfinished fantasy dream, written around 1880. The text appears in English for the first time, accompanied by a brief editorial annotation. Inspired by Claude Bernard's discussion of the 'resurrection' of Rotifera and Tardigrada, Cajal dreams of having stayed inside a forgotten coffin as a desiccated spore; he awakens after an earthquake, becomes rehydrated by a rain shower, and meets Doctor Micrococcus, a 61st-century physician, who hosts and guides him. The two enter into a quasi-Socratic dialogue on matters of science, medicine, politics, nutrition, happiness, and education.

Innovations in Federal Statistics

Combining Data Sources While Protecting Privacy

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Committee on National Statistics,Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 030945428X

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 2407

Federal government statistics provide critical information to the country and serve a key role in a democracy. For decades, sample surveys with instruments carefully designed for particular data needs have been one of the primary methods for collecting data for federal statistics. However, the costs of conducting such surveys have been increasing while response rates have been declining, and many surveys are not able to fulfill growing demands for more timely information and for more detailed information at state and local levels. Innovations in Federal Statistics examines the opportunities and risks of using government administrative and private sector data sources to foster a paradigm shift in federal statistical programs that would combine diverse data sources in a secure manner to enhance federal statistics. This first publication of a two-part series discusses the challenges faced by the federal statistical system and the foundational elements needed for a new paradigm.

Habits of a Happy Brain

Retrain Your Brain to Boost Your Serotonin, Dopamine, Oxytocin, & Endorphin Levels

Author: Loretta Graziano Breuning

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1440590508

Category: Psychology

Page: 238

View: 5919

Offers simple activities that help you understand the roles of your "happy chemicals"--serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin, and endorphins. You'll also learn how to build new habits by rerouting the electricity in your brain to flow down a new pathway, making it even easier to trigger these happy chemicals and increase feelings of satisfaction when you need them most.

The Last Lecture

Author: Randy Pausch

Publisher: Hachette Books

ISBN: 1401395511

Category: Self-Help

Page: 224

View: 2359

"We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand."---Randy Pausch A lot of professors give talks titled "The Last Lecture." Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them. And while they speak, audiences can't help but mull the same question: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy? When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave--"Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams"--wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because "time is all you have...and you may find one day that you have less than you think"). It was a summation of everything Randy had come to believe. It was about living. In this book, Randy Pausch has combined the humor, inspiration and intelligence that made his lecture such a phenomenon and given it an indelible form. It is a book that will be shared for generations to come.