Academic Freedom in the Age of the College

Author: Richard Hofstadter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351288903

Category: Education

Page: 284

View: 1135

When this classic volume first appeared, academic freedom was a crucially important issue. It is equally so today. Hofstadter approaches the topic historically, showing how events from various historical epochs expose the degree of freedom in academic institutions. The volume exemplifies Richard Hofstader's qualities as a historian as well as his characteristic narrative ability. Hofstadter first describes the medieval university and how its political independence evolved from its status as a corporate body, establishing a precedent for intellectual freedom that has been a measuring rod ever since. He shows how all intellectual discourse became polarized with the onset of the Reformation. The gradual spread of the Moderate Enlightenment in the colonies led to a major advance for intellectual freedom. But with the beginning of the nineteenth century the rise of denominationalism in both new and established colleges reversed the progress, and the secularization of learning became engulfed by a tidal wave of intensifying piety. Roger L. Geiger's extensive new introduction evaluates Hofstadter's career as a historian and political theorist, his interest in academic freedom, and the continuing significance of Academic Freedom in the Age of the College. While most works about higher education treat the subject only as an agent of social economic mobility, Academic Freedom in the Age of the College is an enduring counterweight to such histories as it examines a more pressing issue: the fact that colleges and universities, at their best, should foster ideas at the frontiers of knowledge and understanding. This classic text will be invaluable to educators, university administrators, sociologist, and historians.

Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity

Confronting the Fear of Knowledge

Author: Joanna Williams

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137514795

Category: Education

Page: 217

View: 2727

Academic freedom is increasingly being threatened by a stifling culture of conformity in higher education that is restricting individual academics, the freedom of academic thought and the progress of knowledge – the very foundations upon which academia and universities are built. Once, scholars demanded academic freedom to critique existing knowledge and to pursue new truths. Today, while fondness for the rhetoric of academic freedom remains, it is increasingly criticised as an outdated and elitist concept by students and lecturers alike and called into question by a number of political and intellectual trends such as feminism, critical theory and identity politics. This provocative and compelling book traces the demise of academic freedom within the context of changing ideas about the purpose of the university and the nature of knowledge. The book argues that a challenge to this culture of conformity and censorship and a defence of academic free speech are needed for critique to be possible and for the intellectual project of evaluating existing knowledge and proposing new knowledge to be meaningful. This book is that challenge and a passionate call to arms for the power of academic thought today.

The Lost Soul of Higher Education

Corporatization, the Assault on Academic Freedom, and the End of the American University

Author: Ellen Schrecker

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595586032

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 7017

Schrecker, the leading historian of the McCarthy-era witch hunts, examines both the key fronts in the present battles over higher ed, and their historical parallels in previous eras – offering a deeply-researched chronicle of the challenges to academic freedom, set against the rapidly changing structure of the academy itself. The Lost Soul of Higher Education tells the interwoven stories of successive, well-funded ideological assaults on academic freedom by outside pressure groups aimed at undermining the legitimacy of scholarly study, viewed alongside decades of eroding higher education budgets -- a trend that has sharply accelerated during the recent economic downturn.

Academic Freedom and the Law

A Comparative Study

Author: Eric Barendt

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1847318037

Category: Law

Page: 360

View: 4742

Academic Freedom and the Law: A Comparative Study provides a critical analysis of the law relating to academic freedom in three major jurisdictions: the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States. The book outlines the various claims which may be made to academic freedom by individual university teachers and by universities and other higher education institutions, and it examines the justifications which have been put forward for these claims. Three separate chapters deal with the legal principles of academic freedom in the UK, Germany, and the USA. A further chapter is devoted to the restrictions on freedom of research which may be imposed by the regulation of clinical trials, by intellectual property laws, and by the terms of contracts made between researchers and the companies sponsoring medical and other research. The book also examines the impact of recent terrorism laws on the teaching and research freedom of academics, and it discusses their freedom to speak about general political and social topics unrelated to their work. This is the first comparative study of a subject of fundamental importance to all academics and others working in universities. It emphasises the importance of academic freedom, while pointing out that, on occasion, exaggerated claims have been made to its exercise.

Broken Knowledge

The Sway of the Scientific and Scholarly Ideal at Union Theological Seminary in New York, 1887-1926

Author: Younglae Kim

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761807803

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 2391

Broken Knowledge explores the impacts of the scientific and scholarly ideal of the modern university on theological education at Union Theological Seminary from 1887-1926. During this period, the marks of the modern university --specialization, the elective system, professionalization, and the empirical research orientation-- were incorporated into theological education. While vigorously implanting the new university's structural and functional patterns into theological education, the seminary and its theologians strove to bring theological discussions into the arena of secularized academia, to achieve independence from church dogmatism, to expand the scope of theological outlook in social domains, and to bind science and religion together. Without doubt, these efforts deserve due recognition. However, it is also undeniable that the current problems in theological education --the fragmentation of the theological curriculum and the loss of a holistic search for religious truth -- have to do with the seminary's adaptation to the new university ideal such as uncritical specialization and narrow modern epistemology at the turn of the century. This book explores how the decline of theology or the sacred in our modern world is connected with the dominance of modern scientific ways of knowing in our search for truth and the lack of holistic approaches to the issue of faith and knowledge. This book searches for the recovery of wholeness in theological education and higher learning in general.

A Very Different Age

Americans of the Progressive Era

Author: Steven J. Diner

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9781429927611

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 7448

The early twentieth century was a time of technological revolution in the United States. New inventions and corporations were transforming the economic landscape, bringing a stunning array of consumer goods, millions of additional jobs, and ever more wealth. Steven J. Diner draws on the rich scholarship of recent social history to show how these changes affected Americans of all backgrounds and walks of life, and in doing so offers a striking new interpretation of a crucial epoch in our history.

Academic Freedom in the Post-9/11 Era

Author: E. Carvalho,D. Downing

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230117295

Category: Education

Page: 300

View: 4123

Academic freedom has been a principle that undergirds the university since 1915. Beyond this, it also protects a spirit of free inquiry essential to a democratic society. But in the post-9/11 present, the basic principles of academic freedom have been deeply challenged. There have been many startling instances where the rhetoric of national security and terror, corporate interests, and privatization have cast a pall over the terrain of academic freedom. In the post-9/11 university, professors face job loss or tenure denial for speaking against state power, while their students pay more tuition and fall deeper in debt. This timely collection features an impressive assembly of the nation s leading intellectuals, addressing some of the most urgent issues facing higher education in the United States today. Spanning a wide array of disciplinary fields, Academic Freedom in the Post-9/11 Era seeks to intervene on the economic and political crises that are compromising the future of our educational institutions.

Academic Capitalism in the Age of Globalization

Author: Brendan Cantwell,Ilkka Kauppinen

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421415372

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 1785

Today, nearly every aspect of higher education—including student recruitment, classroom instruction, faculty research, administrative governance, and the control of intellectual property—is embedded in a political economy with links to the market and the state. Academic capitalism offers a powerful framework for understanding this relationship. Essentially, it allows us to understand higher education’s shift from creating scholarship and learning as a public good to generating knowledge as a commodity to be monetized in market activities. In Academic Capitalism in the Age of Globalization, Brendan Cantwell and Ilkka Kauppinen assemble an international team of leading scholars to explore the profound ways in which globalization and the knowledge economy have transformed higher education around the world. The book offers an in-depth assessment of the theoretical foundations of academic capitalism, as well as new empirical insights into how the process of academic capitalism has played out. Chapters address academic capitalism from historical, transnational, national, and local perspectives. Each contributor offers fascinating insights into both new conceptual interpretations of and practical institutional and national responses to academic capitalism. Incorporating years of research by influential theorists and building on the work of Sheila Slaughter, Larry Leslie, and Gary Rhoades, Academic Capitalism in the Age of Globalization provides a provocative update for understanding academic capitalism. The book will appeal to anyone trying to make sense of contemporary higher education.

American Collegiate Populations

A Test of the Traditional View

Author: Colin Burke

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814786294

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 4829

American Collegiate Populations is an exhaustive and definitive study of the membership of American colleges and universities in the nineteenth century. Colin B. Burke explores the questions of who went, who stayed and where they came from, presenting as answers to these questions a mass of new data put together in an original and interpretive manner. The author offers a devastating critique of the two reference works which until now have commanded scholars' attention. Burke examines Bailey Burritt's Professional Distribution of College and University Undergraduates (1912) noting that Burritt's categories oversimplify the data of the 37 institutions he studies. Donald G. Tewksbury's American Colleges and Universities Before the Civil War (1932), the author explains, presents a skewed interpretation of collegiate decline in the antebellum period. Using a far larger data base and capitalizing on the advances in quantitative history made in the last decade, Burke adopts appropriate analytic categories for college students and their subsequent careers. Amierican Collegiate Populations thus becomes the referent work to replace Burritt and Tewksbury and will likely have an equal longevity in print. American Collegiate Populations systematically compares denominational colleges, colleges by region, and student groups from a host of angles - age entering college, geographical origins, parental occupations. subsequent careers, and professional choices. Burke shows the reach of American colleges back into the socio-economic fabric of the culture. a reach that carries implications for many subjects - religious, economic, social, and intellectual - beyond the mere subject of college alone. Few works force the re-thinking of a whole field of historical inquiry - particularly one that has important bearings on current policy - as Burke's study does. The findings and implications presented in American Collegiate Populations will profoundly affect the scholarly community for decades to come.

Universities in the Age of Corporate Science

The UC Berkeley-Novartis Controversy

Author: Alan P. Rudy

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781592135356

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 3995

Asks the hard questions about partnerships between big business and American universities.

The University in the Age of Globalization

Rankings, Resources and Reforms

Author: W. Bienkowski,J. Brada,G. Stanley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137023031

Category: Political Science

Page: 258

View: 2619

An informed discussion of the global education market, analysing the rankings system, and the determinants which help universities to advance. The authors examine possible improvements in the promotion and commercialization of university research, and the role of universities in the social and economic development of transition economies.

Academic Freedom in the Wired World

Political Extremism, Corporate Power, and the University

Author: Robert O'Neil

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674033726

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 6112

In this passionately argued overview, a longtime activist-scholar takes readers through the changing landscape of academic freedom. From the aftermath of September 11th to the new frontier of blogging, Robert O'Neil examines the tension between institutional and individual interests. Many cases boil down to a hotly contested question: who has the right to decide what is taught in the classroom? O'Neil shows how courts increasingly restrict professorial judgment, and how the feeble protection of what is posted on the Internet and written in email makes academics more vulnerable than ever. Even more provocatively, O'Neil argues, the newest threats to academic freedom come not from government, but from the private sector. Corporations increasingly sponsor and control university-based research, while self-appointed watchdogs systematically harass individual teachers on websites and blogs. Most troubling, these threats to academic freedom are nearly immune from legal recourse. Insisting that new concepts of academic freedom, and new strategies for maintaining it are needed, O'Neil urges academics to work together--and across rigid and simplistic divisions between "left" and "right."

The University in the Global Age

Author: Roger King

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 0230367968

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 691

This book explores different national models of university systems, including their historical development. It examines major themes confronting higher education, such as globalization, the growth of regulatory states, markets and education as a tradable service, and new providers utilizing the latest information and communication technologies. It also looks at implications for traditional universities and national governments.

The Future of Academic Freedom

Author: Louis Menand

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226520056

Category: Education

Page: 239

View: 6809

The essays respond to critics of the university, but they also respond to one another: Rorty and Haskell argue about the epistemological foundations of academic freedom; Gates and Sunstein discuss the legal and educational logic of speech codes. But in the end the volume achieves an unexpected consensus about the need to reconceive the concept of academic freedom in order to meet the threats and risks of the future.

Academic Repression

Reflections from the Academic Industrial Complex

Author: Anthony J. Nocella,Steven Best,Peter McLaren

Publisher: A K PressDistribution

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 590

View: 7674

After 9/11, the Bush administration pressured universities to hand over faculty, staff and student work to be flagged for potential threats. This edited anthology brings together hard-hitting essays from prominent academics to address the pressing issue of whether academic freedom still exists in the American university system. As such, it addresses not only overt attacks on critical thinking, but also - following trends unfolding for decades - engages the broad socio-economic determinants of academic culture.

Censure and Heresy at the University of Paris, 1200-1400

Author: J. M. M. H. Thijssen

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 081220672X

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 5885

For the scholastic philosopher William Ockham (c. 1285-1347), there are three kinds of heresy. The first, and most unmistakable, is an outright denial of the truths of faith. Another is so obvious that a very simple person, even if illiterate, can see how it contradicts Divine Scripture. The third kind of heresy is less clear cut. It is perceptible only after long deliberation and only to individuals who are learned, and well versed in Scripture. It is this third variety of heresy that J.M.M.H. Thijssen addresses in Censure and Heresy at the University of Paris, 1200-1400. The book documents 30 cases in which university trained scholars were condemned for disseminating allegedly erroneous opinions in their teaching or writing, and focuses particularly on four academic censures that have occupied prominent positions in the historiography of medieval philosophy. Thijssen grants central importance to a number of questions so far neglected by historians regarding judicial procedures, the authorities supervising the orthodoxy of teaching, and the effects of condemnations on the careers of the accused. He also places still current questions regarding academic freedom and the nature of doctrinal authority into their medieval contexts.

Academic Freedom in Ethiopia

Perspectives of Teaching Personnel

Author: Taye Assefa

Publisher: African Books Collective

ISBN: 9994450204

Category: Education

Page: 529

View: 2510

Within this parameter, the main objective of the FSS research project was to identify the regulatory framework, institutional arrangements and established practices pertaining to governance, academic freedom and conditions of service of higher-education t