A Taste of Power

A Black Woman's Story

Author: Elaine Brown

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 1101970103

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 587

Elaine Brown assumed her role as the first and only female leader of the Black Panther Party with these words: “I have all the guns and all the money. I can withstand challenge from without and from within. Am I right, Comrade?” It was August 1974. From a small Oakland-based cell, the Panthers had grown to become a revolutionary national organization, mobilizing black communities and white supporters across the country—but relentlessly targeted by the police and the FBI, and increasingly riven by violence and strife within. How Brown came to a position of power over this paramilitary, male-dominated organization, and what she did with that power, is a riveting, unsparing account of self-discovery. Brown’s story begins with growing up in an impoverished neighborhood in Philadelphia and attending a predominantly white school, where she first sensed what it meant to be black, female, and poor in America. She describes her political awakening during the bohemian years of her adolescence, and her time as a foot soldier for the Panthers, who seemed to hold the promise of redemption. And she tells of her ascent into the upper echelons of Panther leadership: her tumultuous relationship with the charismatic Huey Newton, who would become her lover and her nemesis; her experience with the male power rituals that would sow the seeds of the party's demise; and the scars that she both suffered and inflicted in that era’s paradigm-shifting clashes of sex and power. Stunning, lyrical, and acute, this is the indelible testimony of a black woman’s battle to define herself. “A glowing achievement.” —Los Angeles Times “Honest, funny, subjective, unsparing, and passionate. . . A Taste of Power weaves autobiography and political history into a story that fascinates and illuminates.” —The Washington Post “A stunning picture of a black woman’s coming of age in America. Put it on the shelf beside The Autobiography of Malcolm X.” —Kirkus Reviews From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Taste of Power

Author: Cassia Leo

Publisher: Gloss Publishing

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 410

A scorching hot bundle of alpha males from New York Times bestselling author Cassia Leo. Included in this bundle: - CHASE: Part 1 - LUKE: Part 1 (Mirror) - KNOX: Volume 1 - UNAMSKED: Part 1 CHASE: Part 1 A struggling actress finds herself in over her head when she takes a job as an escort and finds her first client is a sexy, dominating presidential candidate. LUKE: Part 1 (Mirror) A corporate spy is sent to steal the latest billion-dollar technology from a competitor, but she ends up having her heart stolen instead. KNOX: Volume 1 The daughter of a notorious crime boss must face the family she's been running from when a sexy billionaire convinces her to help keep her father out of prison. UNMASKED: Volume 1 She's been kept hidden for eighteen years and trained to kill, but she doesn't know why... until a mysterious and deadly stranger gains his way into her apartment and her heart.

The Black Panther Party (reconsidered)

Author: Charles Earl Jones

Publisher: Black Classic Press

ISBN: 9780933121966

Category: Political Science

Page: 519

View: 5669

A collection of essays written by scholars and former Panthers incorporates participant-observer perspectives in an exploration of the party's organization, gender dynamics, and legacy.

Changing Woman

A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America

Author: Karen Anderson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198022138

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 551

While great strides have been made in documenting discrimination against women in America, our awareness of discrimination is due in large part to the efforts of a feminist movement dominated by middle-class white women, and is skewed to their experiences. Yet discrimination against racial ethnic women is in fact dramatically different--more complex and more widespread--and without a window into the lives of racial ethnic women our understanding of the full extent of discrimination against all women in America will be woefully inadequate. Now, in this illuminating volume, Karen Anderson offers the first book to examine the lives of women in the three main ethnic groups in the United States--Native American, Mexican American, and African American women--revealing the many ways in which these groups have suffered oppression, and the profound effects it has had on their lives. Here is a thought-provoking examination of the history of racial ethnic women, one which provides not only insight into their lives, but also a broader perception of the history, politics, and culture of the United States. For instance, Anderson examines the clash between Native American tribes and the U.S. government (particularly in the plains and in the West) and shows how the forced acculturation of Indian women caused the abandonment of traditional cultural values and roles (in many tribes, women held positions of power which they had to relinquish), subordination to and economic dependence on their husbands, and the loss of meaningful authority over their children. Ultimately, Indian women were forced into the labor market, the extended family was destroyed, and tribes were dispersed from the reservation and into the mainstream--all of which dramatically altered the woman's place in white society and within their own tribes. The book examines Mexican-American women, revealing that since U.S. job recruiters in Mexico have historically focused mostly on low-wage male workers, Mexicans have constituted a disproportionate number of the illegals entering the states, placing them in a highly vulnerable position. And even though Mexican-American women have in many instances achieved a measure of economic success, in their families they are still subject to constraints on their social and political autonomy at the hands of their husbands. And finally, Anderson cites a wealth of evidence to demonstrate that, in the years since World War II, African-American women have experienced dramatic changes in their social positions and political roles, and that the migration to large urban areas in the North simply heightened the conflict between homemaker and breadwinner already thrust upon them. Changing Woman provides the first history of women within each racial ethnic group, tracing the meager progress they have made right up to the present. Indeed, Anderson concludes that while white middle-class women have made strides toward liberation from male domination, women of color have not yet found, in feminism, any political remedy to their problems.

Black Power Encyclopedia: From "Black is Beautiful" to Urban Uprisings [2 volumes]

Author: Akinyele Umoja,Karin L. Stanford,Jasmin A. Young

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440840075

Category: Social Science

Page: 917

View: 7144

An invaluable resource that documents the Black Power Movement by its cultural representation and promotion of self-determination and self-defense, and showcases the movement's influence on Black communities in America from 1965 to the mid-1970s. • Gives students and general readers a comprehensive overview of the Black Power Movement and an understanding of its importance within the turbulence and politics of the 1960s and 1970s in the United States as well as in the context of modern-day civil rights • Provides insight into important concepts such as Black self-determination, Black consciousness, independent Black politics, and independent institutions • Features contributions from premier Black Power scholars as well as Black Power activists • Offers topical and biographical entries, a timeline of events, and a bibliography of key print and nonprint sources of additional information

Party Music

The Inside Story of the Black Panthers' Band and How Black Power Transformed Soul Music

Author: Rickey Vincent

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613744951

Category: Music

Page: 432

View: 2283

Party Music explores the culture and politics of the Black Power era of the late 1960s, when the rise of a black militant movement also gave rise to a “Black Awakening” in the arts--and especially in music. Here Rickey Vincent, the award-winning author of Funk, explores the relationship of soul music to the Black Power movement from the vantage point of the musicians and black revolutionaries themselves. Party Music introduces readers to the Black Panther's own band, the Lumpen, a group comprised of rank-and-file members of the Oakland, California-based Party. During their year-long tenure, the Lumpen produced hard-driving rhythm-and-blues that asserted the revolutionary ideology of the Black Panthers. Through his rediscovery of the Lumpen, and based on new interviews with Party and band members, Vincent provides an insider's account of black power politics and soul music aesthetics in an original narrative that reveals more detail about the Black Revolution than ever before. Rickey Vincent is the author of Funk: The Music, The People, and the Rhythm of the One, and has written for the Washington Post, American Legacy, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He teaches at the University of California, Berkeley.

Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare

Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle

Author: Leigh Raiford

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080788233X

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 7231

In Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare, Leigh Raiford argues that over the past one hundred years, activists in the black freedom struggle have used photographic imagery both to gain political recognition and to develop a different visual vocabulary about black lives. Offering readings of the use of photography in the anti-lynching movement, the civil rights movement, and the black power movement, Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare focuses on key transformations in technology, society, and politics to understand the evolution of photography's deployment in capturing white oppression, black resistance, and African American life.

Still Lifting, Still Climbing

African American Women's Contemporary Activism

Author: Kimberly Springer

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814708609

Category: Social Science

Page: 353

View: 6746

Still Lifting, Still Climbing is the first volume of its kind to document African American women's activism in the wake of the civil rights movement. Covering grassroots and national movements alike, contributors explore black women's mobilization around such areas as the black nationalist movements, the Million Man March, black feminism, anti-rape movements, mass incarceration, the U.S. Congress, welfare rights, health care, and labor organizing. Detailing the impact of post-1960s African American women's activism, they provide a much-needed update to the historical narrative. Ideal for course use, the volume includes original essays as well as primary source documents such as first-hand accounts of activism and statements of purpose. Each contributor carefully situates their topic within its historical framework, providing an accessible context for those unfamiliar with black women's history, and demonstrating that African American women's political agency does not emerge from a vacuum, but is part of a complex system of institutions, economics, and personal beliefs. This ambitious volume will be an invaluable resource on the state of contemporary African American women's activism.

The Black Power Movement and American Social Work

Author: Joyce M. Bell

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538014

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 1889

The Black Power movement has often been portrayed in history and popular culture as the quintessential "bad boy" of modern black movement-making in America. Yet this impression misses the full extent of Black Power's contributions to U.S. society, especially in regard to black professionals in social work. Relying on extensive archival research and oral history interviews, Joyce M. Bell follows two groups of black social workers in the 1960s and 1970s as they mobilized Black Power ideas, strategies, and tactics to change their national professional associations. Comparing black dissenters within the National Federation of Settlements (NFS), who fought for concessions from within their organization, and those within the National Conference on Social Welfare (NCSW), who ultimately adopted a separatist strategy, she shows how the Black Power influence was central to the creation and rise of black professional associations. She also provides a nuanced approach to studying race-based movements and offers a framework for understanding the role of social movements in shaping the non-state organizations of civil society.

From the Bullet to the Ballot

The Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party and Racial Coalition Politics in Chicago

Author: Jakobi Williams

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608162

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 8164

In this comprehensive history of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party (ILBPP), Chicago native Jakobi Williams demonstrates that the city's Black Power movement was both a response to and an extension of the city's civil rights movement. Williams focuses on the life and violent death of Fred Hampton, a charismatic leader who served as president of the NAACP Youth Council and continued to pursue a civil rights agenda when he became chairman of the revolutionary Chicago-based Black Panther Party. Framing the story of Hampton and the ILBPP as a social and political history and using, for the first time, sealed secret police files in Chicago and interviews conducted with often reticent former members of the ILBPP, Williams explores how Hampton helped develop racial coalitions between the ILBPP and other local activists and organizations. Williams also recounts the history of the original Rainbow Coalition, created in response to Richard J. Daley's Democratic machine, to show how the Panthers worked to create an antiracist, anticlass coalition to fight urban renewal, political corruption, and police brutality.

Dreaming Me

Black, Baptist, and Buddhist — One Woman's Spiritual Journey

Author: Jan Willis

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0861718364

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 4151

Jan Willis is not Baptist or Buddhist. She is simply both. Dreaming Me is the story of her life, as a child growing up in the Jim Crow South, dealing with racism in an Ivy League college, and becoming involved with the Black Panther Party. But it wasn't until meeting Lama Yeshe, a Tibetan Buddhist monk living in the mountains of Nepal, that she realized who the real Jan Willis was, and how to make the most of the life she was living.

Hair Matters

Beauty, Power, and Black Women's Consciousness

Author: Ingrid Banks

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814713365

Category: Social Science

Page: 197

View: 5910

One of the most resilient images of the Vietnam era is that of the anti-war protester -- often a woman -- spitting on the uniformed veteran just off the plane. The lingering potency of this icon was evident during the Gulf War, when war supporters invoked it to discredit their opposition. In this startling book, Jerry Lembcke demonstrates that not a single incident of this sort has been convincingly documented. Rather, the anti-war Left saw in veterans a natural ally, and the relationship between anti-war forces and most veterans was defined by mutual support. Indeed one soldier wrote angrily to Vice President Spiro Agnew that the only Americans who seemed concerned about the soldier's welfare were the anti-war activists. While the veterans were sometimes made to feel uncomfortable about their service, this sense of unease was, Lembcke argues, more often rooted in the political practices of the Right. Tracing a range of conflicts in the twentieth century, the book illustrates how regimes engaged in unpopular conflicts often vilify their domestic opponents for "stabbing the boys in the back." Concluding with an account of the powerful role played by Hollywood in cementing the myth of the betrayed veteran through such films as Coming Home, Taxi Driver, and Rambo, Jerry Lembcke's book stands as one of the most important, original, and controversial works of cultural history in recent years.

Reclaiming Democracy

The Sixties in Politics and Memory

Author: Meta Mendel-Reyes

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415918206

Category: Political Science

Page: 205

View: 9543

As it challenges a wide range of sixties observers--from George Will to Oliver Stone--Reclaiming Democracy provides a much-needed critical look at our fascination with the sixties and colorfully brings to life the significant role that our memories of that time play in the politics and culture of today.

Black Firsts

4,000 Ground-Breaking and Pioneering Historical Events

Author: Jessie Carney Smith

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 1578594251

Category: Social Science

Page: 848

View: 3760

Achievement engenders pride, and the most significant accomplishments involving people, places, and events in black history are gathered in Black Firsts: 4,000 Ground-Breaking and Pioneering Events.

Die Bücherdiebin

Roman

Author: Markus Zusak

Publisher: cbj Verlag

ISBN: 3894804270

Category: Fiction

Page: 592

View: 2861

Selbst der Tod hat ein Herz ... Molching bei München. Hans und Rosa Hubermann nehmen die kleine Liesel Meminger bei sich auf – für eine bescheidene Beihilfe, die ihnen die ersten Kriegsjahre kaum erträglicher macht. Für Liesel jedoch bricht eine Zeit voller Hoffnung, voll schieren Glücks an – in dem Augenblick, als sie zu stehlen beginnt. Anfangs ist es nur ein Buch, das im Schnee liegen geblieben ist. Dann eines, das sie aus dem Feuer rettet. Dann Äpfel, Kartoffeln und Zwiebeln. Das Herz von Rudi. Die Herzen von Hans und Rosa Hubermann. Das Herz von Max. Und das des Todes. Denn selbst der Tod hat ein Herz. „Die Bücherdiebin“ ist eine Liebesgeschichte, eine Hommage an Bücher und Worte und eine Erinnerung an die Macht der Sprache, die im Roman von Markus Zusak viele Facetten zeigt: den lakonisch-distanzierten Ton des Erzählers, Poesie und Zuversicht – und die reduzierte Sprache der Nazipropaganda.

Zero Tolerance

Quality of Life and the New Police Brutality in New York City

Author: Andrea Mcardle,Tanya Erzen

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764142

Category: Social Science

Page: 316

View: 1279

Amadou Diallo, Abner Louima, Anthony Baez, Patrick Dorismond. New York City has been rocked in recent years by the fate of these four men at the hands of the police. But police brutality in New York City is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that refers not only to the hyperviolent response of white male police officers as in these cases, but to an entire set of practices that target homeless people, vendors, and sexual minorities. The complexity of the problem requires a commensurate response, which Zero Tolerance fulfills with a range of scholarship and activism. Offering perspectives from law and society, women's studies, urban and cultural studies, labor history, and the visual arts, the essays assembled here complement, and provide a counterpoint, to the work of police scholars on this subject. Framed as both a response and a challenge to official claims that intensified law enforcement has produced New York City's declining crime rates, Zero Tolerance instead posits a definition of police brutality more encompassing than the use of excessive physical force. Further, it develops the connections between the most visible and familiar forms of police brutality that have sparked a new era of grassroots community activism, and the day-to-day violence that accompanies the city's campaign to police the "quality of life." Contributors include: Heather Barr, Paul G. Chevigny, Derrick Bell, Tanya Erzen, Dayo F. Gore, Amy S. Green, Paul Hoffman, Andrew Hsiao, Tamara Jones, Joo-Hyun Kang, Andrea McArdle, Bradley McCallum, Andrew Ross, Eric Tang, Jacqueline Tarry, Sasha Torres, and Jennifer R. Wynn.

Anklage

Author: John Grisham

Publisher: Heyne Verlag

ISBN: 3641164699

Category: Fiction

Page: 528

View: 7506

Jedes Unrecht hat seinen Preis Als New Yorker Anwältin hat es Samantha Kofer binnen weniger Jahre zu Erfolg gebracht. Mit der Finanzkrise ändert sich alles. Samantha wird gefeuert. Doch für ein Jahr Pro-Bono-Engagement bekommt sie ihren Job zurück. Samantha geht nach Brady, Virginia, einem 2000-Seelen-Ort, der sie vor große Herausforderungen stellt. Denn anders als ihre New Yorker Klienten, denen es um Macht und Geld ging, kämpfen die Einwohner Bradys um ihr Leben. Ein Kampf, den Samantha bald zu ihrem eigenen macht und der sie das Leben kosten könnte. Samantha Kofer, ambitionierte Anwältin bei einer der größten Kanzleien in New York, wird kurz nach dem Untergang der US-Investmentbank Lehman Brothers von ihrem Job freigestellt. Im Gegensatz zu vielen ihrer Kollegen, die von einem auf den anderen Tag auf der Straße stehen, bietet man ihr einen Deal an: Wenn sie für ein Jahr ohne Gehalt bei einer Non-Profit-Organisation arbeitet, behält sie ihren Job. So verschlägt es Samantha nach Brady, einem kleinen Ort in den Bergen Virginias, wo sie bei einer Beratungsstelle für kostenlosen Rechtsbeistand anheuert. Anfangs noch etwas unbeholfen in der ungewohnten Umgebung, entwickelt Samantha bald ein Gespür für die Nöte der Einwohner Bradys. Menschen, die auf den umliegenden Kohlefeldern jahrelang Schwerstarbeit geleistet haben und nun, ausgebrannt oder erkrankt, von den Kohleunternehmen im Stich gelassen werden. Der tragische Fall eines Arbeiters, der von Elend und Krankheit so gezeichnet ist, dass ihm nur noch wenige Monate zu leben bleiben, lässt Samantha schließlich über sich hinauswachsen. Gemeinsam mit einem befreundeten Anwalt nimmt sie den Kampf gegen die Kohlemagnaten auf und schreckt auch dann nicht zurück, als ihr Leben akut bedroht wird.

Leaving

A Novel

Author: Richard Dry

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 146685040X

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 9909

In 1959, newly-widowed and pregnant Ruby Washington and her thirteen-year-old half brother, Easton, board a bus in rural South Carolina, destined for Oakland, California. There, far from the violent events that forced her to flee her home, Ruby hopes to make a new life for her family. Ruby gives birth to a daughter, Lida, and strives to raise the girl and Easton. But as their Oakland neighborhood changes during the turbulent 1960s, the three are driven apart by forces that Ruby cannot control. Easton becomes involved with civil rights activism and the Black Panthers; Lida, keeping a hurtful family secret to herself, spirals into a cycle of dependency and denial. Finally, Lida's sons Love LeRoy and Li'l Pit must fend for themselves in the inhospitable streets of America, leaving one city for another, searching for a home. Centered around three generations of a family and set against the larger dispossession of African-Americans, Leaving is a blend of history and intimately-observed everyday life-a remarkable debut novel.

The Wire and Philosophy

This America, Man

Author: David Bzdak,Joanna Crosby,Seth Vannatta

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 0812698282

Category: Philosophy

Page: 384

View: 5023

By many accounts, HBO’s The Wire was and remains the greatest and most important television drama of all time. Conceived by writers David Simon and ex-Baltimore homicide detective Ed Burns, this five-season, sixty-episode tour de force has raised the bar for compelling, intelligent television production. With each season addressing a different arena of life in the city of Baltimore, and each season’s narratives tapping into those from previous seasons, The Wire was able to reveal the overlapping, criss-crossing, and colliding realities that shape—if not control—the people, institutions, and culture of the modern American city. The Wire and Philosophy celebrates this show’s realism as well as its intellectual and philosophical clarity. Selected philosophers who are fans of The Wire tap into these conflicts and interconnections to expose the underlying philosophical issues and assumptions and pursue questions, such as, Can cops really tell whether they are smarter than their perps? Or do they fall victim to intellectual vanity? Do individuals really have free will to resist the temptations—of gangs, of drugs, or corruption—that surround them? Is David Simon a modern-day Marx who sees capitalism leading ultimately to its own collapse, or is Baltimore’s story uniquely its own?

Living for the City

Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California

Author: Donna Jean Murch

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807895857

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 1763

In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party (BPP) started with a study group. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics. During an era of expansion and political struggle in California's system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP. In the early 1960s, attending Merritt College and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers' rank and file. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay's African American community--young, poor, and migrant--challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership. By excavating this hidden history, Living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy.