A Survey of Prehistoric Sites in the Region of Flagstaff, Arizona (Classic Reprint)

Author: Harold S. Colton

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9780331383607

Category:

Page: 110

View: 9370

Excerpt from A Survey of Prehistoric Sites in the Region of Flagstaff, Arizona Since the burial grounds of the ancient pueblos and small house sites have proved so rich, what remains is rapidly falling into the hands of the commercial pot hunter. A careful survey is, therefore, necessary at the present time. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Ancient Burial Practices in the American Southwest

Archaeology, Physical Anthropology, and Native American Perspectives

Author: Douglas R. Mitchell,Judy L. Brunson-Hadley,Dorothy Lippert

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826334619

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 4351

Prehistoric burial practices provide an unparalleled opportunity for understanding and reconstructing ancient civilizations and for identifying the influences that helped shape them.

Tracking Prehistoric Migrations

Pueblo Settlers Among the Tonto Basin Hohokam

Author: Jeffery J. Clark

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816520879

Category: Social Science

Page: 124

View: 4751

This monograph takes a fresh look at migration in light of the recent resurgence of interest in this topic within archaeology. The author develops a reliable approach for detecting and assessing the impact of migration based on conceptions of style in anthropology. From numerous ethnoarchaeological and ethnohistoric case studies, material culture attributes are isolated that tend to be associated only with the groups that produce them. Clark uses this approach to evaluate Puebloan migration into the Tonto Basin of east-central Arizona during the early Classic period (A.D. 1200-1325), focusing on a community that had been developing with substantial Hohokam influence prior to this interval. He identifies Puebloan enclaves in the indigenous settlements based on culturally specific differences in the organization of domestic space and in technological styles reflected in wall construction and utilitarian ceramic manufacture. Puebloan migration was initially limited in scale, resulting in the co-residence of migrants and local groups within a single community. Once this co-residence settlement pattern is reconstructed, relations between the two groups are examined and the short-term and long-term impacts of migration are assessed. The early Classic period is associated with the appearance of the Salado horizon in the Tonto Basin. The results of this research suggest that migration and co-residence was common throughout the basins and valleys in the region defined by the Salado horizon, although each local sequence relates a unique story. The methodological and theoretical implications of Clark's work extend well beyond the Salado and the Southwest and apply to any situation in which the scale and impact of prehistoric migration are contested.

Petrified Forest National Park

A Wilderness Bound in Time

Author: George M. Lubick

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816516292

Category: Travel

Page: 212

View: 7674

Yellowstone, Yosemite, the Grand Canyon--a few American national parks enjoy amusement-park status, eclipsing many other beautiful and significant parks due to their heavy political support and spectacular sights. Visitors to Petrified Forest National Park in northeastern Arizona can escape from the litter, snack bars, and crowds of the recreational parks to a 200-million-year-old ecosystem locked in stone. Enhanced by the unrivaled, colorful beauty of the adjacent Painted Desert, Petrified Forest National Park has captivated visitors since the area was discovered by early explorers. The history of the huge fossilized forest parallels that of Arizona. It was discovered and looted by adventurers and largely ignored by the government until President Theodore Roosevelt made it a national monument in 1906. The forest's location along Route 66 brought a large number of visitors during the time it enjoyed only monument status, but lack of funding for protection allowed much damage and theft of fossilized wood. Petrified Forest National Park: A Wilderness Bound in Time speeds the reader on an ancient ecological journey, from the time of dinosaurs to the discovery of their Triassic fossils and on through a century of political maneuvering to create a place for the forest in American history. George Lubick describes how a dedicated few understood the environmental importance as well as the unique beauty of the park's Triassic Chinle Formation and the Painted Desert. Nearly a million people "visit the Triassic" annually; this environmental history of the ancient forest is important for those who know the park as well as those interested in natural America. Petrified Forest National Park is one of the few complete histories of any national park, a well-told, balanced treatment of the environmental, political, and historical factors that shape America's natural history.

Ceramics and Community Organization Among the Hohokam

Author: David R. Abbott

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816519361

Category: Social Science

Page: 259

View: 7304

Among desert farmers of the prehistoric Southwest, irrigation played a crucial role in the development of social complexity. This innovative study examines the changing relationship between irrigation and community organization among the Hohokam and shows through ceramic data how that dynamic relationship influenced sociopolitical development. David Abbott contends that reconstructions of Hohokam social patterns based solely on settlement pattern data provide limited insight into prehistoric social relationships. By analyzing ceramic exchange patterns, he provides complementary information that challenges existing models of sociopolitical organization among the Hohokam of central Arizona. Through ceramic analyses from Classic period sites such as Pueblo Grande, Abbott shows that ceramic production sources and exchange networks can be determined from the composition, surface treatment attributes, and size and shape of clay containers. The distribution networks revealed by these analyses provide evidence for community boundaries and the web of social ties within them. Abbott's meticulous research documents formerly unrecognized horizontal cohesiveness in Hohokam organizational structure and suggests how irrigation was woven into the fabric of their social evolution. By demonstrating the contribution that ceramic research can make toward resolving issues about community organization, this work expands the breadth and depth of pottery studies in the American Southwest.

Science News

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 4293

Books in Print

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 8677

Handbook of North American Indians: Southwest

Author: N.A

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: N.A

Category: Eskimos

Page: 717

View: 5201

This volume covers the prehistory, general history, and languages of the entire Southwest, and the cultures and histories of the Pueblo peoples.

From this earth

the ancient art of Pueblo pottery

Author: Stewart Peckham

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 169

View: 6585

Deadly Landscapes

Case Studies in Prehistoric Southwestern Warfare

Author: Glen Rice,Steven A. LeBlanc

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 385

View: 7451

Deadly Landscapespresents a series of cases that advance the rigorous examination of war in the archaeological record. The studies encompass examples from the Hohokam, Sinagua, Mogollon, and Anasazi regions, plus a pan-regional study of iconography covering the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande Valley. All of the cases focus on the narrow time frame from AD 1200 to the early-1400s, during which evidence for warfare is most pervasive. Contributors to this volume present varying definitions of warfare and use differing types of data to test for the presence of warfare. These detailed case studies give clear demonstration of a pattern of significant warfare in the late prehistoric period that will alter our understanding of ancient Southwestern cultures.

Children's Books in Print, 2007

An Author, Title, and Illustrator Index to Books for Children and Young Adults

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780835248518

Category: Authors

Page: N.A

View: 5904

Forthcoming Books

Author: Rose Arny

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 383