A History of Egypt

From the Arab Conquest to the Present

Author: Afaf Lutfi Al-Sayyid Marsot

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139463276

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 1334

Egypt occupies a central position in the Arab world. Its borders between sand and sea have existed for millennia and yet, until 1952, the country was ruled by foreigners. Afaf al-Sayyid Marsot explores the paradoxes of Egypt's history in an updated edition of her successful A Short History of Modern Egypt. Charting the years from the Arab conquest, through the age of the Mamluks, Egypt's incorporation into the Ottoman Empire, the liberal experiment in constitutional government in the early twentieth century, followed by the Nasser and Sadat years, the new edition takes the story up to the present day. During the Mubarak era, Egyptians have seen major changes with the rise of globalization and its effects on their economy, the advent of new political parties, the entrenchment of Islamic fundamentalism and the consequent changing attitudes to women. This short history is ideal for students and travelers.

A Short History of Modern Egypt

Author: Afaf Lutfi Sayyid-Marsot

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521272346

Category: History

Page: 151

View: 802

A history of Egypt from the Arab conquest to the present day.

A History of Palestine

From the Ottoman Conquest to the Founding of the State of Israel

Author: Gudrun Krämer,Graham Harman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691150079

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 3419

It is impossible to understand Palestine today without a careful reading of its distant and recent past. But until now there has been no single volume in English that tells the history of the events--from the Ottoman Empire to the mid-twentieth century--that shaped modern Palestine. The first book of its kind, A History of Palestine offers a richly detailed interpretation of this critical region's evolution. Starting with the prebiblical and biblical roots of Palestine, noted historian Gudrun Krämer examines the meanings ascribed to the land in the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions. Paying special attention to social and economic factors, she examines the gradual transformation of Palestine, following the history of the region through the Egyptian occupation of the mid-nineteenth century, the Ottoman reform era, and the British Mandate up to the founding of Israel in 1948. Focusing on the interactions of Arabs and Jews, A History of Palestine tells how these connections affected the cultural and political evolution of each community and Palestine as a whole.

A History of the Sudan

From the Coming of Islam to the Present Day

Author: P. M. Holt,M. W. Daly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317863666

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 4144

A History of the Sudan by Martin Daly and PM Holt, sixth edition, has been fully revised and updated and covers the most recent developments that have occurred in Sudan over the last nine years, including the crisis in Darfur. The most notable developments that this text covers includes the decades-long civil war in the South (with the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in January 2005); the emergence of the Sudan as an oil-producer and exporter, and its resulting higher profile in global economic affairs, notably as a partner of China; the emergence of al-Qaeda, the relations of Sudanese authorities with Osama bin Laden (whose headquarters were in the Sudan in the 1990s), and the Sudanese government's complicated relations with the West. This text is key introductory reading for any student of North Africa.

Ancient Egypt

Its Culture and History

Author: J. E. Manchip White

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486140202

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 8852

Fascinating account of Egypt, predynastic civilization through Ptolemies: social and political structure, daily life, international relations, religion and cult of the dead, arts and crafts, science and medicine, sacred writing. 48 plates.

North Africa

A History from Antiquity to the Present

Author: Phillip C. Naylor

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292778783

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 1946

North Africa has been a vital crossroads throughout history, serving as a connection between Africa, Asia, and Europe. Paradoxically, however, the region's historical significance has been chronically underestimated. In a book that may lead scholars to reimagine the concept of Western civilization, incorporating the role North African peoples played in shaping "the West," Phillip Naylor describes a locale whose transcultural heritage serves as a crucial hinge, politically, economically, and socially. Ideal for novices and specialists alike, North Africa begins with an acknowledgment that defining this area has presented challenges throughout history. Naylor's survey encompasses the Paleolithic period and early Egyptian cultures, leading readers through the pharonic dynasties, the conflicts with Rome and Carthage, the rise of Islam, the growth of the Ottoman Empire, European incursions, and the postcolonial prospects for Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, and Western Sahara. Emphasizing the importance of encounters and interactions among civilizations, North Africa maps a prominent future for scholarship about this pivotal region.

Conflict and Conquest in the Islamic World: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]

A Historical Encyclopedia

Author: Alexander Mikaberidze

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1598843370

Category: History

Page: 1042

View: 7736

A reference work that thoroughly documents the extensive military history of the Islamic world between the 7th century and the present day. • Includes an introductory essay • Provides over 600 A–Z entries, many with accompanying images • Contains contributions by some of the leading scholars in the field of military history • Provides a convenient glossary of commonly used Islamic military terms intended for general readers

Christian Martyrs under Islam

Religious Violence and the Making of the Muslim World

Author: Christian C. Sahner

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691184186

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 3501

How did the medieval Middle East transform from a majority-Christian world to a majority-Muslim world, and what role did violence play in this process? Christian Martyrs under Islam explains how Christians across the early Islamic caliphate slowly converted to the faith of the Arab conquerors and how small groups of individuals rejected this faith through dramatic acts of resistance, including apostasy and blasphemy. Using previously untapped sources in a range of Middle Eastern languages, Christian Sahner introduces an unknown group of martyrs who were executed at the hands of Muslim officials between the seventh and ninth centuries CE. Found in places as diverse as Syria, Spain, Egypt, and Armenia, they include an alleged descendant of Muhammad who converted to Christianity, high-ranking Christian secretaries of the Muslim state who viciously insulted the Prophet, and the children of mixed marriages between Muslims and Christians. Sahner argues that Christians never experienced systematic persecution under the early caliphs, and indeed, they remained the largest portion of the population in the greater Middle East for centuries after the Arab conquest. Still, episodes of ferocious violence contributed to the spread of Islam within Christian societies, and memories of this bloodshed played a key role in shaping Christian identity in the new Islamic empire. Christian Martyrs under Islam examines how violence against Christians ended the age of porous religious boundaries and laid the foundations for more antagonistic Muslim-Christian relations in the centuries to come.

The Arabs

A History

Author: Eugene Rogan

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465032486

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 7032

Named Best Book of the Year by the Financial Times, the Economist and the Atlantic In this definitive history of the modern Arab world, award-winning historian Eugene Rogan draws extensively on five centuries of Arab sources to place the Arab experience in its crucial historical context. In this updated and expanded edition, Rogan untangles the latest geopolitical developments of the region to offer a groundbreaking and comprehensive account of the Middle East. The Arabs is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the modern Arab world. "Deeply erudite and distinctly humane."-Atlantic "An outstanding, gripping and exuberant narrative . . . that explains much of what we need to know about the world today."-Simon Sebag Montefiore, Financial Times

A History of Islamic Societies

Author: Ira M. Lapidus

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521514304

Category: History

Page: 1020

View: 4009

An accessible worldwide history of Muslim societies provides updated coverage of each country and region, in a volume that discusses their origins and evolution while offering insight into historical processes that shaped contemporary Islam and surveying its growing influence. Simultaneous. (Social Science)

The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Islamic World

Author: Francis Robinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521669931

Category: Religion

Page: 328

View: 7478

Written by a team of leading specialists on Islamic history, this book discusses, with sumptuous illustrations, many aspects of Muslim culture. Includes studies on religion, politics, commerce, education, art and the interaction between Islam and the West, as well as the development of the Islamic world from the seventh century to the present day. Clear, informative, with commentaries and a glossary.

The Unmaking of the Middle East

A History of Western Disorder in Arab Lands

Author: Jeremy Salt

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520261704

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 3737

Politics & government.

Cairo

Author: André Raymond

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674003163

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 1876

The extraordinary tapestry of Cairo's past and present comes vividly to life in this magisterial study by one of the top social historians of the Arab world. This deeply observed account shows Cairo from the glimmer of its beginnings in the Arab conquest of Egypt in 640 through its transformation into the modern center of Middle Eastern life today. 63 halftones. Maps & tables.

The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt (641-1517)

Author: Mark N. Swanson

Publisher: American Univ in Cairo Press

ISBN: 9789774160936

Category: Religion

Page: 226

View: 1931

In Volume 1 of this series, Stephen Davis contended that the themes of 'apostolicity, martyrdom, monastic patronage, and theological resistance' were determinative for the cultural construction of Egyptian church leadership in late antiquity. Volume 2, The Coptic Papacy in Islamic Egypt, showsthat the medieval Coptic popes (641-1517 CE) were regularly portrayed as standing in continuity with their saintly predecessors; however, at the same time they were active in creating something new, the Coptic Orthodox Church, a community that struggled to preserve a distinctive life and witnesswithin the new Islamic world order. The medieval popes are depicted as 'living martyrs' in the Church of the Martyrs, as conductors of an orchestra of holiness, as community representatives hard-pressed by financial obligations and engaged in complex relationships with both Muslim officials and Coptic lay notables, as patrons of aresilient sacred geography that rooted Coptic culture in a network of holy places, and as leaders in both acculturation and resistance to a largely Islamic society. Building on recent advances in the study of sources for Coptic church history, the present volume aims to show how portrayals of themedieval popes provide a window into the religious and social life of their community.

The Vanished Library

Author: Luciano Canfora

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520072558

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 205

View: 2433

Recreates the world of ancient Egypt, describes how the Library of Alexandria was created, and speculates on its destruction

From Deep State to Islamic State

The Arab Counter-Revolution and Its Jihadi Legacy

Author: Jean-Pierre Filiu

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190264063

Category: Arab Spring, 2010-

Page: 311

View: 6332

In his disturbing and timely book Jean-Pierre Filiu lays bare the strategies and tactics employed by the Middle Eastern autocracies, above all those of Syria, Egypt, Yemen and Algeria, that set out to crush the democratic uprisings of the 'Arab Revolution.' In pursuit of these goals they turned to the intelligence agencies and internal security arms of the 'deep state,' the armed forces, and to street gangs such as the Shabiha to enforce their will. Alongside physical intimidation, imprisonment and murder, Arab counter-revolutionaries discredited and split their opponents by boosting Salafi-Jihadi groups such as Islamic State. They also released from prison hardline Islamists and secretly armed and funded them. The full potential of the Arab counter-revolution surprised most observers, who thought they had seen it all from the Arab despots: their perversity, their brutality, their voracity. But the wider world underestimated their ferocious readiness literally to burn down their countries in order to cling to absolute power. Bashar al-Assad clambered to the top of this murderous class of tyrants, driving nearly half of the Syrian population in to exile and executing tens of thousands of his opponents. He has set a grisly precedent, one that other Arab autocrats are sure to follow in their pursuit of absolute power.

A History of Islamic Societies

Author: Ira M. Lapidus

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139991507

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2760

This new edition of one of the most widely used course books on Islamic civilizations around the world has been substantially revised to incorporate the new scholarship and insights of the last twenty-five years. Ira Lapidus' history explores the beginnings and transformations of Islamic civilizations in the Middle East and details Islam's worldwide diffusion. The history is divided into four parts. Part I is a comprehensive account of pre-Islamic late antiquity; the beginnings of Islam; the early Islamic empires; and Islamic religious, artistic, legal and intellectual cultures. Part II deals with the construction in the Middle East of Islamic religious communities and states to the fifteenth century. Part III includes the history to the nineteenth century of Islamic North Africa and Spain; the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires; and other Islamic societies in Asia and Africa. Part IV accounts for the impact of European commercial and imperial domination on Islamic societies and traces the development of the modern national state system and the simultaneous Islamic revival from the early nineteenth century to the present.

The Field of Blood

The Battle for Aleppo and the Remaking of the Medieval Middle East

Author: Nicholas Morton

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096700

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2012

A history of the 1119 Battle of the Field of Blood, which decisively halted the momentum gained during the First Crusade and decided the fate of the Crusader states In 1119, the people of the Near East came together in an epic clash of horses, swords, sand, and blood that would decide the fate of the city of the Aleppo--and the eastern Crusader states. Fought between tribal Turkish warriors on steppe ponies, Arab foot soldiers, Armenian bowmen, and European knights, the battlefield was the amphitheater into which the people of the Near East poured their full gladiatorial might. Carrying a piece of the true cross before them, the Frankish army advanced, anticipating a victory that would secure their dominance over the entire region. But the famed Frankish cavalry charge failed them, and the well-arranged battlefield dissolved into a melee. Surrounded by enemy forces, the crusaders suffered a colossal defeat. With their advance in Northern Syria stalled, the momentum of the crusader conquest began to evaporate, and would never be recovered.

The Conquest of Andalusia

A Historical Novel Describing the History of Spain and Its Circumstances Before the Muslim Conquest, the Conquest Itself Under the Command of Tariq Ibn Ziyad, and the Death of Roderic, the King of the Visigoths

Author: Jurji Zaidan

Publisher: Zaidan Foundation, Incorporated

ISBN: 9780615499598

Category: Fiction

Page: 369

View: 3777

It is Christmas Day in the year 710 AD in Toledo, capital of Visigoth Spain. King Wittiza has been dethroned, and the impulsive and tyrannical Roderic has been installed as monarch of Spain with the help of the Catholic clergy. Even so, Bishop Oppas, the deposed king's brother, is to remain as the senior ecclesiastical figure in Spain during King Roderic's reign. The beautiful Florinda is the daughter of Count Julian, the governor of Sabta, a Christian enclave in Muslim North Africa. She is madly in love and engaged to the charismatic and courageous Alfonso, son of the deposed king. But she has been moved into King Roderic's palace where she is the target of the new king's lustful desires, even though he is married. And Alfonso has been kept as a retainer in the palace so that his comings and goings can be monitored. Will Florinda manage to thwart the lascivious advances of the depraved king? Will Alfonso be able to foil the king's designs? And how will Florinda's father, Count Julian, react when he learns of Roderic's evil plans towards his daughter? What role will Bishop Oppas play -- torn as he is between loyalty to Visigoth Spain and faithfulness to his values and his family? The fast-paced story, full of twists and turns, unfolds as the Muslim armies in North Africa are poised to cross the Straits of Gibraltar and gain their first European foothold in what came to be called the land of al-Andalus. The Conquest of Andalusia is also the story of the battle for Florinda's virtue and happiness ....