A Crime of Self-Defense

Bernhard Goetz and the Law on Trial

Author: George P. Fletcher

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 450

Legal expert George Fletcher uses the celebrated trial of New York's "Subway Vigilante", Bernhard Goetz, as a springboard to probe the profound relationship between this defensive action, the public's understanding of it, and the court's interpretation of it according to the law.

American Law in a Global Context

The Basics

Author: George P. Fletcher

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 682

View: 114

Resource added for the Paralegal program 101101.

The Moral Arc

How Science Makes Us Better People

Author: Michael Shermer

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 560

View: 873

Bestselling author Michael Shermer's exploration of science and morality that demonstrates how the scientific way of thinking has made people, and society as a whole, more moral From Galileo and Newton to Thomas Hobbes and Martin Luther King, Jr., thinkers throughout history have consciously employed scientific techniques to better understand the non-physical world. The Age of Reason and the Enlightenment led theorists to apply scientific reasoning to the non-scientific disciplines of politics, economics, and moral philosophy. Instead of relying on the woodcuts of dissected bodies in old medical texts, physicians opened bodies themselves to see what was there; instead of divining truth through the authority of an ancient holy book or philosophical treatise, people began to explore the book of nature for themselves through travel and exploration; instead of the supernatural belief in the divine right of kings, people employed a natural belief in the right of democracy. In The Moral Arc, Shermer will explain how abstract reasoning, rationality, empiricism, skepticism--scientific ways of thinking--have profoundly changed the way we perceive morality and, indeed, move us ever closer to a more just world.

Contemporary Criminal Law

Concepts, Cases, and Controversies

Author: Matthew Lippman

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 639

View: 838

This is a comprehensive, introductory criminal law textbook that expands upon traditional concepts and cases by coverage of the most contemporary topics and issues. Contemporary material, including terrorism, computer crimes, and hate crimes, serves to illuminate the ever-evolving relationship between criminal law, society and the criminal justice system's role in balancing competing interests. The case method is used throughout the book as an effective and creative learning tool.Features include:" vignettes, core concepts, 'Cases and Concepts', 'You Decides, excerpts from state statutes, 'legal equations' and Crime in the News boxes" fully developed end-of-chapter pedagogy includes review questions, legal terminology and 'Criminal Law on the Web' resources" instructor resources (including PowerPoint slides, a computerized testbank and classroom activities) and a Student Study Site accompany this text

Cinema Inferno

Celluloid Explosions from the Cultural Margins

Author: Robert G. Weiner

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 420

View: 133

This is a provocative collection of essays that provide cutting edge, original research in film studies, discussing a number of 'transgressive' films that have never before had such in-depth analysis and treatment. From '70s Italian horror films and extreme European cinema to Nazi propaganda films and fundamentalist Christian 'scare' movies, these essays explore many different genres and themes.

Murder and the Reasonable Man

Passion and Fear in the Criminal Courtroom

Author: Cynthia Lee

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 371

View: 797

A man murders his wife after she has admitted her infidelity; another man kills an openly gay teammate after receiving a massage; a third man, white, goes for a jog in a “bad” neighborhood, carrying a pistol, and shoots an African American teenager who had his hands in his pockets. When brought before the criminal justice system, all three men argue that they should be found “not guilty”; the first two use the defense of provocation, while the third argues he used his gun in self-defense. Drawing upon these and similar cases, Cynthia Lee shows how two well-established, traditional criminal law defenses—the doctrines of provocation and self-defense—enable majority-culture defendants to justify their acts of violence. While the reasonableness requirement, inherent in both defenses, is designed to allow community input and provide greater flexibility in legal decision-making, the requirement also allows majority-culture defendants to rely on dominant social norms, such as masculinity, heterosexuality, and race (i.e., racial stereotypes), to bolster their claims of reasonableness. At the same time, Lee examines other cases that demonstrate that the reasonableness requirement tends to exclude the perspectives of minorities, such as heterosexual women, gays and lesbians, and persons of color. Murder and the Reasonable Man not only shows how largely invisible social norms and beliefs influence the outcomes of certain criminal cases, but goes further, suggesting three tentative legal reforms to address problems of bias and undue leniency. Ultimately, Lee cautions that the true solution lies in a change in social attitudes.

Race, Crime, and the Law

Author: Randall Kennedy

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 560

View: 813

In this powerfully reasoned, lucidly written work, Harvard Law Professor Randall Kennedy takes on the highly complex issues of race, crime, and the legal system, uncovering the long-standing failure of the justice system to protect blacks from criminals and revealing difficult truths about these factors in the United States. From the Hardcover edition.

Self-Defence in International and Criminal Law

The Doctrine of Imminence

Author: Onder Bakircioglu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 347

The book provides a broad and interdisciplinary approach to the doctrine of self-defence in both domestic criminal and international law. In particular it focuses on the requirement of imminence, which deals with the question of when individuals or States may legitimately resort to defensive force against a serious danger or harm. Drawing from scholarship across law, history, politics and philosophy, this book explores the permissibility of employing preventive force under the law of individual and national self-defence. The book illustrates how the law of international self-defence, and in particular the requirement of imminence, has been subjected to controversy in parallel with its domestic counterpart. In both disciplines the debate over imminence is centred on similar concerns, issues and tensions despite the fact the arguments put forward are designed to address different scenarios. The book surveys the roots, role, rationale, and objectives of self-defence and questions whether the requirement of imminence should be removed from the traditional contours of the self-defence doctrine in national and international law.

Law 101

Everything You Need to Know About American Law, Fourth Edition

Author: Jay Feinman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 400

View: 859

In each of the first three editions of the bestselling Law 101, Jay Feinman gave readers an upbeat and vivid examination of the American legal system. Since the third edition was published in 2010, much has happened: several key Supreme Court cases have been decided, we've seen sensational criminal trials, and the legal system has had to account for the latest developments in Internet law. This fully updated fourth edition of Law 101 accounts for all this and more, as Feinman once again provides a clear introduction to American law. The book covers all the main subjects taught in the first year of law school, and discusses every facet of the American legal tradition, including constitutional law, the litigation process, and criminal, property, and contracts law. To accomplish this, Feinman brings in the most noteworthy, infamous, and often outrageous examples and cases. We learn about the case involving scalding coffee that cost McDonald's half a million dollars, the murder trial in Victorian London that gave us the legal definition of insanity, and the epochal decision of Marbury vs. Madison that gave the Supreme Court the power to declare state and federal law unconstitutional. A key to learning about the law is learning legal vocabulary, and Feinman helps by clarifying terms like "due process" and "equal protection," as well as by drawing distinctions between terms like "murder" and "manslaughter." Above all, though, is that Feinman reveals to readers of all kinds that despite its complexities and quirks, the law is can be understood by everyone. Perfect for students contemplating law school, journalists covering legislature, or even casual fans of "court-television" shows, Law 101 is a clear and accessible introduction to the American legal system. New to this edition: Featured analysis of: -the Obamacare case -Citizens United -the DOMA decision -the Trayvon Martin case As well as recent legal developments pertaining to: -online contracting -mortgages -police investigations -criminal sentencing