A Brief Narrative of the Case and Tryal of John Peter Zenger

with Related Documents

Author: Paul Finkelman

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312474430

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 9248

A Brief Narrative of the Case and Tryal of John Peter Zenger is one of the most significant publications of colonial America and represents a major turning point in the history of freedom of the press and the political development of colonial America and the early republic. The book, published by Zenger in 1736, recounts his 1735 trial on charges of seditious libel and contains groundbreaking arguments by Zenger’s attorney, Andrew Hamilton. In this volume — which reprints the text of the Narrative as well as other contemporary documents, including excerpts from Zenger’s newspaper — Paul Finkelman provides a thorough and lively overview of the issues, events, and political intrigue surrounding the Zenger trial and offers a broad perspective on the trial’s long-term impact. Finkelman’s introduction and headnotes to the documents provide historical context and analysis, which make the documents accessible to students. Other useful pedagogical aids include a chronology, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography.

A Brief Narrative of the Case and Tryal of John Peter Zenger, Printer of the New-York Weekly Journal

Author: JOHN PETER. ZENGER

Publisher: Gale Ecco, Print Editions

ISBN: 9781385160046

Category:

Page: 52

View: 5135

The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars. This collection reveals the history of English common law and Empire law in a vastly changing world of British expansion. Dominating the legal field is the Commentaries of the Law of England by Sir William Blackstone, which first appeared in 1765. Reference works such as almanacs and catalogues continue to educate us by revealing the day-to-day workings of society. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++ British Library W002757 Caption title. As recorded by Andrew Hamilton and edited by James Alexander. Zenger made certain additions before publishing the account in 1736. Cf. Rutherfurd, Livingston. John Peter Zenger, p. 127-128. Imprint from colophon. John and Thomas Fleet printed at the Bible and Heart in 1799. [Boston]: Reprinted and sold [by John and Thomas Fleet] at the Bible and Heart, Cornhill, Boston, MDCCXCIX. [1799]. 48p.; 8°

The Salem Witch Hunt

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Richard Godbeer

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319118178

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6318

The Salem witch trials stand as one of the infamous moments in colonial American history. More than 150 people -- primarily women -- from 24 communities were charged with witchcraft; 19 were hanged and others died in prison. In his introduction to this compact yet comprehensive volume, Richard Godbeer explores the beliefs, fears, and historical context that fueled the witch panic of 1692. The documents in this collection illuminate how the Puritans' worldview led them to seek a supernatural explanation for the problems vexing their community. Presented as case studies, the carefully chosen records from several specific trials offer a clear picture of the gender norms and social tensions that underlie the witchcraft accusations. The final documents cover recantations of confessions, the aftermath of the witch hunt, and statements of regret. A chronology of the witchcraft crisis, questions for consideration, and a selected bibliography round out the book's pedagogical support.

Froth and Scum

Truth, Beauty, Goodness, and the Ax Murder in America's First Mass Medium

Author: Andie Tucher

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807866016

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 7598

Two notorious antebellum New York murder cases--a prostitute slashed in an elegant brothel and a tradesman bludgeoned by the brother of inventor Samuel Colt--set off journalistic scrambles over the meanings of truth, objectivity, and the duty of the press that reverberate to this day. In 1833 an entirely new kind of newspaper--cheap, feisty, and politically independent--introduced American readers to the novel concept of what has come to be called objectivity in news coverage. The penny press was the first medium that claimed to present the true, unbiased facts to a democratic audience. But in Froth and Scum, Andie Tucher explores--and explodes--the notion that 'objective' reporting will discover a single, definitive truth. As they do now, news stories of the time aroused strong feelings about the possibility of justice, the privileges of power, and the nature of evil. The prostitute's murder in 1836 sparked an impassioned public debate, but one newspaper's 'impartial investigation' pleased the powerful by helping the killer go free. Colt's 1841 murder of the tradesman inspired universal condemnation, but the newspapers' singleminded focus on his conviction allowed another secret criminal to escape. By examining media coverage of these two sensational murders, Tucher reveals how a community's needs and anxieties can shape its public truths. The manuscript of this book won the 1991 Allan Nevins Prize of the Society of American Historians for the best-written dissertation in American history. from the book Journalism is important. It catches events on the cusp between now and then--events that still may be changing, developing, ripening. And while new interpretations of the past can alter our understanding of lives once led, new interpretations of the present can alter the course of our lives as we live them. Understanding the news properly is important. The way a community receives the news is profoundly influenced by who its members are, what they hope and fear and wish, and how they think about their fellow citizens. It is informed by some of the most occult and abstract of human ideas, about truth, beauty, goodness, and justice.

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798

Testing the Constitution

Author: Terri Diane Halperin

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142141970X

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 8050

In May 1798, after Congress released the XYZ Affair dispatches to the public, a raucous crowd took to the streets of Philadelphia. Some gathered to pledge their support for the government of President John Adams, others to express their disdain for his policies. Violence, both physical and political, threatened the safety of the city and the Union itself. To combat the chaos and protect the nation from both external and internal threats, the Federalists swiftly enacted the Alien and Sedition Acts. Oppressive pieces of legislation aimed at separating so-called genuine patriots from objects of suspicion, these acts sought to restrict political speech, whether spoken or written, soberly planned or drunkenly off-the-cuff. Little more than twenty years after Americans declared independence and less than ten since they ratified both a new constitution and a bill of rights, the acts gravely limited some of the very rights those bold documents had promised to protect. In The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, Terri Diane Halperin discusses the passage of these laws and the furor over them, as well as the difficulties of enforcement. She describes in vivid detail the heated debates and tempestuous altercations that erupted between partisan opponents: one man pulled a gun on a supporter of the act in a churchyard; congressmen were threatened with arrest for expressing their opinions; and printers were viciously beaten for distributing suspect material. She also introduces readers to the fraught political divisions of the late 1790s, explores the effect of immigration on the new republic, and reveals the dangers of partisan excess throughout history. Touching on the major sedition trials while expanding the discussion beyond the usual focus on freedom of speech and the press to include the treatment of immigrants, Halperin’s book provides a window through which readers can explore the meaning of freedom of speech, immigration, citizenship, the public sphere, the Constitution, and the Union.

Slave in a Box

The Strange Career of Aunt Jemima

Author: M. M. Manring

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813918112

Category: Social Science

Page: 210

View: 6641

The figure of the mammy occupies a central place in the lore of the Old South and has long been used to ullustrate distinct social phenomena, including racial oppression and class identity. In the early twentieth century, the mammy became immortalized as Aunt Jemima, the spokesperson for a line of ready-mixed breakfast products. Although Aunt Jemima has undergone many makeovers over the years, she apparently has not lost her commercial appeal; her face graces more than forty food products nationwide and she still resonates in some form for millions of Americans. In Slave in a Box, M.M. Manring addresses the vexing question of why the troubling figure of Aunt Jemima has endured in American culture. Manring traces the evolution of the mammy from her roots in the Old South slave reality and mythology, through reinterpretations during Reconstruction and in minstrel shows and turn-of-the-century advertisements, to Aunt Jemima's symbolic role in the Civil Rights movement and her present incarnation as a "working grandmother." We learn how advertising entrepreneur James Webb Young, aided by celebrated illustrator N.C. Wyeth, skillfully tapped into nostalgic 1920s perceptions of the South as a culture of white leisure and black labor. Aunt Jemima's ready-mixed products offered middle-class housewives the next best thing to a black servant: a "slave in a box" that conjured up romantic images of not only the food but also the social hierarchy of the plantation South. The initial success of the Aunt Jemima brand, Manring reveals, was based on a variety of factors, from lingering attempts to reunite the country after the Civil War to marketing strategies around World War I. Her continued appeal in the late twentieth century is a more complex and disturbing phenomenon we may never fully understand. Manring suggests that by documenting Aunt Jemima's fascinating evolution, however, we can learn important lessons about our collective cultural identity.

The Good Girls Revolt

How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace

Author: Lynn Povich

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610391748

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 8787

It was the 1960s--a time of economic boom and social strife. Young women poured into the workplace, but the "Help Wanted" ads were segregated by gender and the "Mad Men" office culture was rife with sexual stereotyping and discrimination. Lynn Povich was one of the lucky ones, landing a job at Newsweek, renowned for its cutting-edge coverage of civil rights and the "Swinging Sixties." Nora Ephron, Jane Bryant Quinn, Ellen Goodman, and Susan Brownmiller all started there as well. It was a top-notch job--for a girl--at an exciting place. But it was a dead end. Women researchers sometimes became reporters, rarely writers, and never editors. Any aspiring female journalist was told, "If you want to be a writer, go somewhere else." On March 16, 1970, the day Newsweek published a cover story on the fledgling feminist movement entitled "Women in Revolt," forty-six Newsweek women charged the magazine with discrimination in hiring and promotion. It was the first female class action lawsuit--the first by women journalists--and it inspired other women in the media to quickly follow suit. Lynn Povich was one of the ringleaders. In The Good Girls Revolt, she evocatively tells the story of this dramatic turning point through the lives of several participants. With warmth, humor, and perspective, she shows how personal experiences and cultural shifts led a group of well-mannered, largely apolitical women, raised in the 1940s and 1950s, to challenge their bosses--and what happened after they did. For many, filing the suit was a radicalizing act that empowered them to "find themselves" and fight back. Others lost their way amid opportunities, pressures, discouragements, and hostilities they weren't prepared to navigate. The Good Girls Revolt also explores why changes in the law didn't solve everything. Through the lives of young female journalists at Newsweek today, Lynn Povich shows what has--and hasn't--changed in the workplace.

Gabriel's Rebellion

The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 and 1802

Author: Douglas R. Egerton

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807864188

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 8189

Gabriel's Rebellion tells the dramatic story of what was perhaps the most extensive slave conspiracy in the history of the American South. Douglas Egerton illuminates the complex motivations that underlay two related Virginia slave revolts: the first, in 1800, led by the slave known as Gabriel; and the second, called the 'Easter Plot,' instigated in 1802 by one of his followers. Although Gabriel has frequently been portrayed as a messianic, Samson-like figure, Egerton shows that he was a literate and highly skilled blacksmith whose primary goal was to destroy the economic hegemony of the 'merchants,' the only whites he ever identified as his enemies. According to Egerton, the social, political, and economic disorder of the Revolutionary era weakened some of the harsh controls that held slavery in place during colonial times. Emboldened by these conditions, a small number of literate slaves--most of them highly skilled artisans--planned an armed insurrection aimed at destroying slavery in Virginia. The intricate scheme failed, as did the Easter Plot that stemmed from it, and Gabriel and many of his followers were hanged. By placing the revolts within the broader context of the volatile political currents of the day, Egerton challenges the conventional understanding of race, class, and politics in the early days of the American republic.

Keeping Faith with the Constitution

Author: Goodwin Liu,Pamela S. Karlan,Christopher H. Schroeder

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199752836

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 7957

Chief Justice John Marshall argued that a constitution "requires that only its great outlines should be marked [and] its important objects designated." Ours is "intended to endure for ages to come, and consequently, to be adapted to the various crises of human affairs." In recent years, Marshall's great truths have been challenged by proponents of originalism and strict construction. Such legal thinkers as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia argue that the Constitution must be construed and applied as it was when the Framers wrote it. In Keeping Faith with the Constitution, three legal authorities make the case for Marshall's vision. They describe their approach as "constitutional fidelity"--not to how the Framers would have applied the Constitution, but to the text and principles of the Constitution itself. The original understanding of the text is one source of interpretation, but not the only one; to preserve the meaning and authority of the document, to keep it vital, applications of the Constitution must be shaped by precedent, historical experience, practical consequence, and societal change. The authors range across the history of constitutional interpretation to show how this approach has been the source of our greatest advances, from Brown v. Board of Education to the New Deal, from the Miranda decision to the expansion of women's rights. They delve into the complexities of voting rights, the malapportionment of legislative districts, speech freedoms, civil liberties and the War on Terror, and the evolution of checks and balances. The Constitution's framers could never have imagined DNA, global warming, or even women's equality. Yet these and many more realities shape our lives and outlook. Our Constitution will remain vital into our changing future, the authors write, if judges remain true to this rich tradition of adaptation and fidelity.

Bridging Literacies with Videogames

Author: Hannah R. Gerber,Sandra Schamroth Abrams

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9462096686

Category: Education

Page: 210

View: 3352

Bridging Literacies with Videogames provides an international perspective of literacy practices, gaming culture, and traditional schooling. Featuring studies from Australia, Colombia, South Korea, Canada, and the United States, this edited volume addresses learning in primary, secondary, and tertiary environments with topics related to: • re-creating worlds and texts • massive multiplayer second language learning • videogames and classroom learning These diverse topics will provide scholars, teachers, and curriculum developers with empirical support for bringing videogames into classroom spaces to foster meaning making. Bridging Literacies with Videogames is an essential text for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty interested in contemporizing learning with the medium of the videogame.

The SAGE Handbook of Rhetorical Studies

Author: Andrea A. Lunsford,Kirt H. Wilson,Rosa A. Eberly

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 148334343X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 712

View: 2801

The SAGE Handbook of Rhetorical Studies surveys the latest advances in rhetorical scholarship, synthesizing theories and practices across major areas of study in the field and pointing the way for future studies. Edited by Andrea A. Lunsford and Associate Editors Kirt H. Wilson and Rosa A. Eberly, the Handbook aims to introduce a new generation of students to rhetorical study and provide a deeply informed and ready resource for scholars currently working in the field.

The St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Barbara B. Diefendorf

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312413606

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 486

A riveting account of the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre, its origins, and its aftermath, this volume by Barbara B. Diefendorf introduces students to the most notorious episode in France’s sixteenth century civil and religious wars and an event of lasting historical importance. The murder of thousands of French Protestants by Catholics in August 1572 influenced not only the subsequent course of France’s civil wars and state building, but also patterns of international alliance and long-standing cultural values across Europe. The book begins with an introduction that explores the political and religious context for the massacre and traces the course of the massacre and its aftermath. The featured documents offer a rich array of sources on the conflict — including royal edicts, popular songs, polemics, eyewitness accounts, memoirs, paintings, and engravings — to enable students to explore the massacre, the nature of church-state relations, the moral responsibility of secular and religious authorities, and the origins and consequences of religious persecution and intolerance in this period. Useful pedagogic aids include headnotes and gloss notes to the documents, a list of major figures, a chronology of key events, questions for consideration, a selected bibliography, and an index.

Empire City

New York Through the Centuries

Author: Kenneth T. Jackson,David S. Dunbar

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231109093

Category: History

Page: 994

View: 7991

This major anthology brings together the best literary writing about New York--from O. Henry, Theodore Dreiser, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and John Steinbeck to Paul Auster and James Baldwin.

The Scientific Revolution

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Margaret C. C. Jacob

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312653491

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 4885

This volume by Margaret C. Jacob explores the Scientific Revolution from its origins in the early sixteenth century to its widespread acceptance in Western societies in the late eighteenth century. Jacob’s introduction outlines the trajectory of the Scientific Revolution and argues that the revival of ancient texts in the Renaissance and the upheaval of the Protestant Reformation paved the way for science. The collected documents include writings of well-known scientists and philosophers, such as Nicolaus Copernicus, Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, Rene Descartes, and Isaac Newton, as well as primary sources documenting innovations in medicine and engineering, advances in scientific investigations, and the popularization of the scientific revolution through academies and their journals. Document headnotes, questions for consideration, a chronology, and a selected bibliography support students’ study of the Scientific Revolution.

AP Us Hist 2016

Author: John J. Newman

Publisher: Perfection Learning

ISBN: 9781682404553

Category: Advanced placement programs (Education)

Page: 764

View: 6385

Equip your students to excel on the AP® United States History Exam, as updated for 2016 Features "flexibility designed to use in a one-semester or one-year course "divided into nine chronological periods mirroring the structure of the new AP® U.S. College Board Curriculum Framework, the text reflects the Board's effort to focus on trends rather than isolated facts "each period features a one-page overview summarizing the major developments of the period and lists the three featured Key Concepts from the College Board Curriculum Framework "each Think As a Historian feature focuses on one of the nine historical thinking skills that the AP® exam will test "each chapter narrative concludes with Historical Perspectives, a feature that addresses the College Board emphasis on how historians have interpreted the events of the chapter in various ways "the chapter conclusion features a list of key terms, people, and events organized by theme, reflecting the College Board's focus on asking students to identify themes, not just events "chapter assessments include eight multiple-choice items, each tied to a source as on the new AP® exam, as well as four short-answer questions "period reviews include both long-essay questions and Document-Based Questions in the format of those on the AP® exam, as updated for 2016

Defending Slavery: Proslavery Thought in the Old South

A Brief History with Documents

Author: Paul Finkelman

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

ISBN: 9780312133276

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 9020

Within decades of the American Revolution, the Northern states had either ended slavery or provided for its gradual abolition. Slavery, however, was entrenched in the South and remained integral to American politics and culture. Nationally, it was protected by the U.S. Constitution, federal laws, and Supreme Court decisions, and slaveowners dominated all three branches of the federal government. From the time of the Revolution until the Civil War (and beyond), Southern thinkers offered a variety of proslavery arguments. This body of thought—based on religion, politics and law, economics, history, philosophy, expediency, and science—offers invaluable insights into how slavery shaped American history and continues to affect American society. In this volume, Paul Finkelman presents a representative selection of proslavery thought and includes an introduction that explores the history of slavery and the debate over it. His headnotes supply a rich context for each reading. The volume also includes a chronology, a selected bibliography, and illustrations.

Criminal Justice Case Briefs

Significant Cases in Corrections

Author: Craig Hemmens,Katherine Bennett,Barbara Belbot

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781931719391

Category: Law

Page: 197

View: 4397

"Criminal justice case briefs: significant cases in corrections is comprehensive in its treatment of corrections law, covering all of the major cases in the area. It features: (1) a list of cases, in alphabetical order and grouped by topic; (2) briefs of each case, arranged by topic; (3) a short introduction to each topic. intended to put the cases into context and provide some unity; and (4) an index."

Bi-centennial History of Albany

History of the County of Albany, N.Y., from 1609 to 1886

Author: George Rogers Howell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Albany (N.Y.)

Page: 997

View: 9705

Roots of the Republic

American Founding Documents Interpreted

Author: Stephen L. Schechter

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1461642795

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 486

Roots of the Republic shows how the Constitution was a product, not simply of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, but of a legal and philosophical tradition almost two centuries old. The editors have selected eighteen key documents in the development of that tradition and reproduced them with essays that explain what they mean, why they were written, and why they are important today. Each key document is accompanied by an interpretive essay written by a contemporary scholar. These essays focus on the importance of each frame of government and include commentaries on why they are meaningful today. Intended to help readers learn how to read and understand these documents, the book is also a handy reference and a strong introduction to the development of political thought and the debates surrounding the formation of the state governments and the federal union.

Ecodomy – Life in its fullness

Author: Dirk J. Human,Zorodzai (Zoro) Dube,Gerda de Villiers,P.G.J. (Piet) Meiring,Jerry Pillay,Wayne G. Smith,Christo Thesnaar,John Robert van Niekerk,Ernest van Eck,Tanya van Wyk,Pieter M. Venter,Johan M. van der Merwe

Publisher: AOSIS

ISBN: 1928396143

Category: Religion

Page: 205

View: 2914

This book provides a coherent and conceptual portrayal of aspects of the theological research theme, entitled Ecodomy (literally meaning to ‘build a house’). In its figurative meaning the term Ecodomy addresses the theme, ‘life in its fullness’. This fullness of life entails a polarity which is inherently part of life, namely its brokenness and its wholeness. From various theological disciplines, namely Old Testament Studies, New Testament Studies, Systematic Theology, Church History and Practical Theology, both the brokenness and wholeness are addressed theologically. Every chapter focuses on a specific theological discipline, while the combination of theological disciplines, addresses the brokenness and wholeness of life as coherent concept. One pole does not exclude the other. Brokenness is visible in current or recent very relevant societal challenges, such as racism and xenophobia, apartheid, foreignness and exclusivism, leadership crises and violence. In contrast, wholeness is embedded in themes such as the African concept of ubuntu, a life of faith and wisdom, reconciling leadership, or transforming space and community. Ultimately, a Greek term ἀναίδεια (persistence) is connected to the meaning of Ecodomy and ‘life in its fullness’. Several methodologies have been used in the different contributions of the book. Every theological discipline applies a different methodology for the purpose of exposing a specific topic or research theme. In general, the contributions in this book follow a combination of a literature study with the further application of diachronic and synchronic exegetical methods. In addition, single contributions follow an own hermeneutical approach. Not one single contribution, but a combination of different theological disciplines, which form the concepts of brokenness and wholeness (life in its fullness), which expose the polarity of life, are included in this book. In its exposed interdisciplinary interwovenness, the book provides a tapestry of how different theological disciplines are combined into a single theme and how they contribute together by means of theological analyses and attempted building blocks to build the broken ‘houses’ of societal structures or human life. The book contributes to selected aspects of broken life in society and the healing experiences of human life. Several themes touch on recent and relevant challenges which have contributed to the brokenness of life. Not only in South Africa, but globally these are currently relevant themes. They include realities of racism and xenophobia, apartheid, foreignness and exclusivism, leadership crises and violence. With the focus on wholeness, specific attention is given to the African concept of ubuntu, a life of faith and wisdom, reconciling leadership, and transforming space and society. A Greek term ἀναίδεια (insolence as ‘in keeping on asking’ – Lk 11:8) illuminates the theme of Ecodomy from the perspective of a parable. The target audience of the book is academic scholars and theologians, who specialise in the different fields of Theology, the Humanities and other Social Sciences. Furthermore, the book is also accessible to scholars of other academic disciplines outside these disciplines. The book contains original research and contributions have not been plagiarised from publications elsewhere.